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eccullen

 

Posts: 86
Joined: Aug. 14 2007
 

Ramirez blancas from 1950 

A friend has acquired a 1949 Ramirez that needs substantial restoration.

Can anyone reflect on the qualities of the Ramirez flamencos from this period?
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 20 2020 20:48:04
 
ernandez R

Posts: 147
Joined: Mar. 25 2019
From: Alaska USA

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to eccullen

eccullen,
Photos would be interesting.

HR



quote:

ORIGINAL: eccullen

A friend has acquired a 1949 Ramirez that needs substantial restoration.

Can anyone reflect on the qualities of the Ramirez flamencos from this period?


_____________________________

I prefer my flamenco guitar spicy,
doesn't have to be fast,
should have some meat on the bones,
can be raw or well done,
as long as it doesn't sound like it's turning green on an elevator floor.

www.instagram.com/threeriversguitars
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 20 2020 21:10:22
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 2966
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to eccullen

quote:

A friend has acquired a 1949 Ramirez that needs substantial restoration. Can anyone reflect on the qualities of the Ramirez flamencos from this period?


That sounds like a good question for Echi, our resident expert on such matters.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 20 2020 21:56:42
 
eccullen

 

Posts: 86
Joined: Aug. 14 2007
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to ernandez R

Hey are some photos

Ed









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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 20 2020 22:09:40
 
Echi

 

Posts: 757
Joined: Jan. 11 2013
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to eccullen

Lovely guitar.
It’s a first class flamenco (the studio label of those years is blue and circular) probably made by Antonio Martinez, Aguado or even by the young Jose’ Ramirez III. Paulino Bernabe’ will join the shop years later.
What to say? Those guitars are very light and yet with firm basses and very balanced.
Not by chance the market praises the Ramirez made before ‘65.
In those years the workshop counted 4 people and Ramirez was a very reputable firm.
If you were in the market in those years you had Barbero, Borreguero, the first works of the Conde brothers (Sobrinos of Esteso) and Jose’ Ramirez.
Prices used to be in the same league but Barbero had the ineritance of the best players, being the successor of Santos.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 21 2020 16:23:07
 
eccullen

 

Posts: 86
Joined: Aug. 14 2007
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to Echi

Echi,

Thank you very much for the information!

Ed
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 21 2020 17:25:29
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7566
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to eccullen

This is a lower tier guitar, not a fine master grade Blanca.

The bridge is over built, the rosette is nice. Look at the string slots cut in the headstock- shoddy work, really sloppy. Cut with a dull axe. Everything you want to know is right there.

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 26 2020 16:33:01
 
Ricardo

Posts: 11704
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to estebanana

quote:

ORIGINAL: estebanana

This is a lower tier guitar, not a fine master grade Blanca.

The bridge is over built, the rosette is nice. Look at the string slots cut in the headstock- shoddy work, really sloppy. Cut with a dull axe. Everything you want to know is right there.


Probably why jose, who built this one by hand probably as echi says, needed to hire a team of builders.😂

In fact that gives me an idea. This guitar could have turned out a whole lot better if you had one guy, an expert in just bridges, that cuts hundreds of em a day perfectly with a Machine, then a different guy who specializes in string slots, etc. wow, you could probably even reduce costs and sell more product! Ingenious!! No more imperfect guitars!

_____________________________

CD's and transcriptions available here:
www.ricardomarlow.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 26 2020 20:30:10
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7566
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to Ricardo

No, Jose’s work doesn’t look that shoddy. It’s a lower tier instrument, build fast. It’s inelegant and Jose was an exacting task master during the next phase in the shop with all the to become famous journeymen. The top tier journeymen guitars were clean. The guitars from the 40’s are also clean, but there’s a lower tier instrument they pushed out. I’ve seen the rectangular label in poorly made guitars and the circular one in ok guitars- it doesn’t constitute an absolute indication of well made ness.

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 26 2020 21:26:00
 
Echi

 

Posts: 757
Joined: Jan. 11 2013
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to eccullen

Well, in a general way Ramirez II guitars are known to be less precisely made than later guitars of the same family brand, not a secret.
To say it all, even the woods used in those years are not exceptional.
Ramirez III will make a step forward in building quality: not by chance he hired Bernabe and Contreras, both skilled chair makers and had them trained from scratch to a high standard.
Nonetheless they are very good guitars considered the poor times in Spain after the civil war; lack of precision is something quite spread, particularly with flamenco guitars made in those years: I saw some Barbero and Sobrinos guitars definitely worst. Definitely.
It’s just something of those years as pointed out by airlift and others; nowadays people are more focused on appearance than substance while these people used to go to the point probably because of the poor times for business.
Eventually it’s not that important: I used to own some Gerundino guitars: you could easily spot the guitars made by the man from those made by people paid by Eladio as they usually play better and look as they are done in a hurry and rough.

I’m not praising poorly skilled makers here: I just mean to say that many good flamenco guitars are not refined as they should.
My 2 cents
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 27 2020 8:01:44
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7566
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to Echi

I disagree- there are guitars from Esteso, Santos, Barbero and others working then that show a artistic threshold of quality on a consistent basis, and an undercurrent of faster less accurate work. There’s always been division between what the makers were capable of and the guitars they released with less time spent on them.

Today’s standards are ridiculous by comparison, and milk out a lot of the character of the guitar because collectors expect decorative elements over function. But still there were artistic level instruments and less expensive models.

They also knew the difference between making big clunky bridges and sleek high performance bridges. They took extra time with the guitars made at pro level.

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 27 2020 9:30:29
 
RobF

Posts: 574
Joined: Aug. 24 2017
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to Ricardo

quote:

In fact that gives me an idea. This guitar could have turned out a whole lot better if you had one guy, an expert in just bridges, that cuts hundreds of em a day perfectly with a Machine, then a different guy who specializes in string slots, etc. wow, you could probably even reduce costs and sell more product! Ingenious!! No more imperfect guitars!


I know you’re kidding around, but I think the premise is wrong. Parts bin, cookie-cutter guitars are seldom perfect, oft-times they’re just boring. Which doesn’t mean they can’t make great music in the hands of an appreciative and capable player. I mean boring to Joe(sephine) Guitarmaker person.

There’s nothing preventing a maker from making up a batch of ‘perfect’ bridges and tossing them in a bin for future use, but that’s not how making a good guitar generally works. True, a lot of makers follow fairly rigid patterns, but there’s also a good amount who don’t. At the very least, most makers tend to select and match the woods for each instrument, not just cosmetically but also with the musicality of the instrument in mind. And, when the approach is taken that the bridge is also a component of the bracing system, then it’s important to have the freedom to match not only the wood but also for its dimensions to be optimal for each individual instrument. So, from one guitar to the next, the bridges can be slightly different.

It can also come down to why bother doing this at all? There’s nothing intrinsically wrong with patterning guitars after models and following systems that allow repeatability, but not every maker is interested in working that way. A good maker is going to make good guitars, regardless of the methods chosen, and each individual is going to follow the path that gives them the most satisfaction, if not money. Not every maker sees the craft as an industrial endeavour, in some cases it’s the opposite.

As far as the subject of this thread goes, I don’t know why people are bothering with it when the pictures posted are of such poor quality. There is a chance the slots are the result of a hack-job peghead conversion. My Contreras is like that, it looks like the conversion was done with the tip of a chainsaw, and this was to a top-shelf, signed guitar. What little can be seen of the rest of the headstock in the crappy pictures also points to sloppy work, however, so maybe I’m off base with that idea. I also wonder if the bridge is even original? It would be necessary to see the guitar up close to determine that. The reason I’m thinking in this direction is the rosette appears to be quite nice, maybe nicer than a low end model would warrant. But, like Ricardo has hinted, I suspect the Madrid shops were no strangers to the parts bin approach, so maybe it was just grabbed from a batch at hand.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 27 2020 14:19:36
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7566
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to eccullen

Rob,

Come to your senses. Why blame blurry photographs when bringing parlous and divisive sarcasm to the analysis is much less helpful, but absolutely more fun?

Save your brain cells for reasoning with non metallic guitarsists. Ricardo still thinks rosettes are sticker decals or airbrushed stencils made in Minsk.

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 29 2020 2:28:00
 
Tom Blackshear

 

Posts: 2118
Joined: Apr. 15 2008
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to estebanana

This thread reminds me of a 1958 Jose Ramirez owned by Robert Guthrie which he sold to me for a $125 to buy a $350 Fleta, 1939 sold by Chris Barker in Dallas Texas many years ago.

I fixed up the Ramirez and sold it to the Melody Shop for $350 to finance my trip to Spain in 1965.

_____________________________

Tom Blackshear Guitar maker
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 29 2020 15:37:09
 
Ricardo

Posts: 11704
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to estebanana

quote:

Ricardo still thinks rosettes are sticker decals or airbrushed stencils made in Minsk.


It all goes back to the time I gave a workshop on a very humid day in a Central American country...I watched that rosette of a student’s nice guitar simply fall off. After all the laughing stopped I must admit the horror of the truth revealed has been burned on my brain for all times.

_____________________________

CD's and transcriptions available here:
www.ricardomarlow.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 29 2020 17:43:10
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7566
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to Ricardo

That must have been a nightmare. I apologize for retraumatizing you.

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 29 2020 20:22:42
 
JasonM

Posts: 1219
Joined: Dec. 8 2005
From: Baltimore

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to RobF

The tuner slots look very similar to my signature craftsmanship but I can confirm it’s not my work here. I like more disproportionate string ramps
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 29 2020 20:45:14
 
RobF

Posts: 574
Joined: Aug. 24 2017
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to JasonM

quote:

I like more disproportionate string ramps

You want disproportionate? Here are the slots on my Contreras. I don’t know if they went at it with a Stihl or a Husqvarna, but they approached the conversion with great skill. The barrel holes were likely done with a small jack hammer, but at least they were artistically sensitive and ensured they were asymmetrical.

Note the nod to Picasso in the rendering of the ramps.



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Attachment (1)
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 29 2020 21:14:55
 
TonyGonzales84

 

Posts: 33
Joined: Apr. 23 2020
From: San Diego, CA

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to eccullen

Because of how my mind is wired I had to download and rotate your picture, and at first it didn't look too bad...then I scanned from the top of the head toward the nut, and now it's all I can see! Ouch.

I'd actually be afraid I'd have a few cups and want to even things out, symmetrically, with a couple of rasps and files.

_____________________________

Tony
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 30 2020 0:37:02
 
RobF

Posts: 574
Joined: Aug. 24 2017
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to TonyGonzales84

Yeah, sorting out this guitar has been on my list for quite some time now, but it has a few more pressing issues than the head. Two cracks in the back and one on the top need to be repaired and it also needs a new fingerboard, neck straightening, and possibly or likely a carbon fibre reinforcement. The head is at the bottom of the list and, although I think it could clean up pretty nicely without too much effort, I’m not sure I won’t just leave anything alone that doesn’t truly require fixing. Part of the charm of a guitar like this, at least to me, are the scars and foibles that come from a hard lived existence.

I might do a pictorial on it one day. It’s actually quite a nice instrument and isn’t nearly as bad as any accurate description will make it seem. It may never win any beauty contests, but it has loads of character. It’s a good guitar.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 30 2020 1:14:12
 
TonyGonzales84

 

Posts: 33
Joined: Apr. 23 2020
From: San Diego, CA

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to eccullen

Peter Tsiorba discusses a reverse conversion on his website -- machines to pegs, that would be cool for your eventual head project. It's hard to beat the look of a real peghead!

https://tsiorba.com/converting-from-pegs-to-machine-tuners-and-vise-versa/

_____________________________

Tony
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 30 2020 4:42:16
 
RobF

Posts: 574
Joined: Aug. 24 2017
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to TonyGonzales84

These posts got me to thinking about this a bit more last night. When I first got the guitar the first thing I had planned on doing was to plug and re-drill the badly placed holes, clean up the ramps, and put a nice set of Fusteros on from the small stash I acquired before they stopped producing. Converting back to pegs could be done, but I hadn’t considered it.

My feeling now is I’d prefer to leave it as it is, unless I run into problems with the tuner upgrade, in which case the hole placement might get addressed. But I might just see how these tuners perform after a clean-up.

My reasoning is the head is now a record of the history of this instrument and cleaning it up or altering it could be considered to be, in some ways, more of an attempt to erase the history than to add to it. I don’t adhere to the current trend of wanting old instruments to be pristine and super clinically perfect. This, and most of the old guitars I’ve loved, are anything but perfectly symmetrical or pristine.

The other downside to attacking the head problem is, if I do so, I would be taking part ownership of it. The conversion was done in such a manner that I would never be able to bring it up to the standard that it would have been at if I had done the work myself from scratch. To do so would require removing more wood, and I’d also want it to look like something the builder would have done, instead of just doing it the way I would normally. In other words, a restoration of something that never was. So any solution will be a compromise and, if it doesn’t come out just perfect, people will wonder how much of the dog’s breakfast was due to my interference, and not the work of the original hacker. I don’t want to go there.

Also, although I appreciate the original reasons behind conversions, the advent of tuners such as Pegheds kind of makes them unnecessary. And if it’s unnecessary, then doing one could be considered to be vandalous. It’s a practice whose time has past, I think. At this point, I wouldn’t do one anyways, even if asked nicely by someone with a good wad of cash in hand. Which doesn’t really have anything to do with the current problem, I realize, but it’s the logical follow through on my thoughts.

So, I think the head is going to get a pass. I’ll do the things the guitar needs to make it healthy and playable, and leave well enough alone with the asymmetry and ugly ramps, lol. It can wear its scars and knocks with pride, there’s no need for it to cover them in shame, at least not for my benefit.

Well, those are my thoughts as of this morning, after thinking about it on and off throughout the night. But, yeah, I like peg heads a lot, too, this guitar would have been so cool if it would have just been left the way it was created. It’s still cool, I guess.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 30 2020 14:11:49
 
RobF

Posts: 574
Joined: Aug. 24 2017
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to RobF

Ed, hopefully I haven’t strayed too far off the original topic with my thoughts. Apologies if I wandered into hijack territory.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 30 2020 18:17:35
 
TonyGonzales84

 

Posts: 33
Joined: Apr. 23 2020
From: San Diego, CA

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to eccullen

Rob, I agree with your sentiment that, in looking at a guitar, one sees some of its history, and that it is "dis-respectful" and almost sacrilegious to take anything away from that. I would never recommend or suggest applying a face-lift to an honest, well used and loved guitar (which, unfortunately so many aging movie stars and such do -- I like to see them get their gray hair, not getting botox anywhere near their lips, etc).

The ownership issue you mention is spot on, and to quote Rush, if you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice -- perfectly valid. I figure that I am a current, temporary owner of the few types of physical things that I am in possession of that can actually be handed on, whether through my conscious gifting or re-sale, or those that my heirs may someday be stuck with. As such, within reason (I am not a collector, but a user) I definitely do try to respect the item's state, for any future owner's joy and wonder (if this guitar could only talk...).

Sheesh, I'm sorry for getting way too sentimental, especially so long before Happy Hour!

_____________________________

Tony
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 1 2020 0:09:44
 
JasonM

Posts: 1219
Joined: Dec. 8 2005
From: Baltimore

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to RobF

quote:

Here are the slots on my Contreras


Had to study the pic to see behind the string ramps. I didn’t even notice the tuner roller misalignment until you pointed out. But had made that headstock I definitely would have noticed! But, yes, most important is how she sounds and plays.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 1 2020 2:48:23
 
ernandez R

Posts: 147
Joined: Mar. 25 2019
From: Alaska USA

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to RobF

quote:

ORIGINAL: RobF

quote:

In fact that gives me an idea. This guitar could have turned out a whole lot better if you had one guy, an expert in just bridges, that cuts hundreds of em a day perfectly with a Machine, then a different guy who specializes in string slots, etc. wow, you could probably even reduce costs and sell more product! Ingenious!! No more imperfect guitars!


I know you’re kidding around, but I think the premise is wrong. Parts bin, cookie-cutter guitars are seldom perfect, oft-times they’re just boring. Which doesn’t mean they can’t make great music in the hands of an appreciative and capable player. I mean boring to Joe(sephine) Guitarmaker person.

There’s nothing preventing a maker from making up a batch of ‘perfect’ bridges and tossing them in a bin for future use, but that’s not how making a good guitar generally works. True, a lot of makers follow fairly rigid patterns, but there’s also a good amount who don’t. At the very least, most makers tend to select and match the woods for each instrument, not just cosmetically but also with the musicality of the instrument in mind. And, when the approach is taken that the bridge is also a component of the bracing system, then it’s important to have the freedom to match not only the wood but also for its dimensions to be optimal for each individual instrument. So, from one guitar to the next, the bridges can be slightly different.

It can also come down to why bother doing this at all? There’s nothing intrinsically wrong with patterning guitars after models and following systems that allow repeatability, but not every maker is interested in working that way. A good maker is going to make good guitars, regardless of the methods chosen, and each individual is going to follow the path that gives them the most satisfaction, if not money. Not every maker sees the craft as an industrial endeavour, in some cases it’s the opposite.

As far as the subject of this thread goes, I don’t know why people are bothering with it when the pictures posted are of such poor quality. There is a chance the slots are the result of a hack-job peghead conversion. My Contreras is like that, it looks like the conversion was done with the tip of a chainsaw, and this was to a top-shelf, signed guitar. What little can be seen of the rest of the headstock in the crappy pictures also points to sloppy work, however, so maybe I’m off base with that idea. I also wonder if the bridge is even original? It would be necessary to see the guitar up close to determine that. The reason I’m thinking in this direction is the rosette appears to be quite nice, maybe nicer than a low end model would warrant. But, like Ricardo has hinted, I suspect the Madrid shops were no strangers to the parts bin approach, so maybe it was just grabbed from a batch at hand.


Rob,
this is a reply to a comment you made upthread some. Hard to keep,up,with the fast moving Foro crew ;)

I have a theory about how different level parts get on different guitars. I think if one has a shop with just a few apprentices one will get to cut out say bridge blanks, he brings them to the master who determines which will go on the premium guitar and which on the student models, he hands the stack a blanks back to the apprentice telling him to shape all the less perfect pieces first and save the better ones for last under penalty of death for miss carving. Something like that. I ran my aviation maintenance shop under a similar system.

I built my #3,4,5 together using the less perfect woods on my #3 and the best top and other woods on the #5. My intention was to also improve my building skills also so I had learned much along with each one. There is a build thread on the Delcamp under Mk-III or something like that.

I had roughed out a set of six bridge blanks a couple weeks ago, I use a table saw so to make the slot etc so it goes fairly fast. As I was hobbling out of the wood shop I recalled this older builder video where the master was tossing bridge blanks on a tile floor and listening to the quality of their tone in order to determine which one he wanted. So there I was tossing the hickory blanks, all slotted up, but exactly the same size not exactly sure what I was looking for but for the general idea that one might have a hidden crack or inclusion that would effect, lower, or deaden the sound. They all rang true but one seemed to have a more clear and higher frequency ring so I chose that one.

Funny, I didn't like how this particular light toned hickory looked on the spruce top after I had chiseled it out a few days later, three days with my limited standing time of thirty minutes max. I went back in the shop afterwords and made a batch of oak bridges, from the same well aged block of oak I cut the fretboards, but haven't finished one yet. The blanks sound nice ringing on my concreat shop floor though...

HR

_____________________________

I prefer my flamenco guitar spicy,
doesn't have to be fast,
should have some meat on the bones,
can be raw or well done,
as long as it doesn't sound like it's turning green on an elevator floor.

www.instagram.com/threeriversguitars
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 1 2020 3:29:56
 
Echi

 

Posts: 757
Joined: Jan. 11 2013
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to eccullen

quote:

Here are the slots on my Contreras

I had too a guitar like this. At the beginning I didn’t even notice it, later it bothered me a lot (I’m a fussy guy) and decided to fix it.
Now I’m at peace with my conscience but I have to say that the final result is noticeable anyway.
Today I would leave it as it is.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 1 2020 10:38:31
 
El Burdo

 

Posts: 559
Joined: Sep. 8 2011
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to TonyGonzales84

quote:

Peter Tsiorba discusses a reverse conversion on his website -- machines to pegs


Ouch. I had a go at that - it works, though all out of kilter - 1) machines in badly hacked ex-peghead, 2) the finger of luthiery mockiery 3) the build 4) the end result, with unshown mahogany veneers, masking scars.

Hopefully this is broadly on message, sorry if not.









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Attachment (4)
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 1 2020 21:02:40
 
ernandez R

Posts: 147
Joined: Mar. 25 2019
From: Alaska USA

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to El Burdo

El B.

Did you notice any sonic difference one she had settled out after changing back to pegs, you know just to drag this thread another direction?

Was it back to pegs or just from machine tuners?

Was the change Historical compliance or aesthetic?

HR

_____________________________

I prefer my flamenco guitar spicy,
doesn't have to be fast,
should have some meat on the bones,
can be raw or well done,
as long as it doesn't sound like it's turning green on an elevator floor.

www.instagram.com/threeriversguitars
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 1 2020 21:21:27
 
RobF

Posts: 574
Joined: Aug. 24 2017
 

RE: Ramirez blancas from 1950 (in reply to ernandez R

quote:

I had roughed out a set of six bridge blanks a couple weeks ago


Yeah, I’ll rough out certain parts in batches, too. I always make a pile of peonies and kerfed liners in one go, anything that amounts to slog work that can slow down or derail a build’s momentum is a good candidate for batching. Sometimes I’ll make up four or five necks and bring them to the point that the heads are done and the heel blocks attached, but not slotted. Then I have some on hand if I’m in a hurry, but most often I’ll make the neck along with the guitar. I have batched bridges before, but I don’t always make them the same dimensions so I stopped doing that. I also like to match the bridge wood to the heads, so it seems pointless to make them beforehand.

Speaking of different types woods that can be used, I generally make my kerfed liners out of Spanish Cedar, mainly because I love the smell it brings to the guitar, but I have a bunch of nice Willow that I think I’ll use to make solid liners. It’s light, strong, bends well, and was the liner wood of choice of the old violin makers. I’ve used it a couple of times before and it worked nicely, doesn’t have the great smell, though.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 1 2020 21:46:36
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