Foro Flamenco
Posts Since Last Visit | Advanced Search | Home | Register | Login

Today's Posts | Inbox | Profile | Our Rules | Contact Admin | Log Out



Welcome to one of the most active flamenco sites on the Internet. Guests can read most posts but if you want to participate click here to register.
This site is dedicated to the memory of Paco de Lucía, Ron Mitchell, Guy Williams, Linda Elvir, Philip John Lee, Craig Eros and Ben Woods who went ahead of us too soon.
We receive 12,200 visitors a month from 200 countries and 1.7 million page impressions a year. To advertise on this site please contact us.





What size plane for thicknessing   You are logged in as Guest
Users viewing this topic: none
  Printable Version
All Forums >>Discussions >>Lutherie >> Page: [1]
Login
Message<< Newer Topic  Older Topic >>
 
JasonM

Posts: 1830
Joined: Dec. 8 2005
From: Baltimore

What size plane for thicknessing 

I'm thinking of investing in a good plane to start practicing with.

What size plane/s are generally good for thicknessing the back, sides and top? A #5 Jack, or a #7 maybe?
Could I get buy with a jointing plane and a block plane?

I do have access to a drum sander and a full wood shop stationary tools at a club I belong to, but I'm trying to build my skills with hand tools.

Anders recommends a really good set of stones over expensive tools I think. Maybe I should invest time and money into sharpening over an old Stanley or whatever?
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 13 2016 19:26:21
 
Andy Culpepper

Posts: 2955
Joined: Mar. 30 2009
From: NY, USA

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

I use one of these that I picked up very cheap and tuned up:
http://www.handplane.com/273/stanley-victor-no-1105-jack-plane/

It absolutely works for thicknessing all woods. The main improvement would be getting a higher quality blade but before I had my sander, I could get through an Indian Rosewood back and side set without resharpening so I was happy.

I wouldn't try it with a block plane as you need a good handle, but a smoothing plane should work fine.

The most important things with any plane are:

-Flatten the bottom to within a few thousandths of an inch. You can use a very flat piece of granite or float glass with adhesive sandpaper (lubricated).

-Sharpen the blade til you can shave with it. I like to hollow grind my primary bevel and then put a sharp micro bevel on it with 4 grits of sandpaper/microfinishing film stuck to 3/8" float glass. I do it all by hand without honing guides.
Put a very slight curvature on the blade from side to side, so the corners don't dig in more than the center.

_____________________________

Andy Culpepper, luthier
http://www.andyculpepper.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 13 2016 19:52:57
 
Flamingrae

 

Posts: 218
Joined: May 19 2009
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

Got quite a few planes now - assorted sizes for different jobs. You will pick them up as time goes by. I have been enjoying using some of the japanese planes lately. Aside from their novelty, once you have them set up, they are a real pleasure to use. I like the fact they have wooden bodies so there is no accidental damage to wood. Sharpening the blades are the secret - you will spend longer doing this than conventional planes. I have three sizes now - 30, 40 and 60mm - the 60 is a real beast but does the job great. I'm not sure if anyone else has this one but for different wood, there is always one plane you have that works better than the rest. This can be different depending upon the wood.
I might suggest some strops ( throwing a real wobbly!!) - bits of soft leather with a backing board. If you charge these with a polishing compound like rouge, they are great at removing any burr built up using oil or water stones and create a mirror finish to the blade.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 14 2016 1:07:30
 
estebanana

Posts: 8345
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to Flamingrae

quote:

Got quite a few planes now - assorted sizes for different jobs. You will pick them up as time goes by. I have been enjoying using some of the japanese planes lately. Aside from their novelty, once you have them set up, they are a real pleasure to use. I like the fact they have wooden bodies so there is no accidental damage to wood. Sharpening the blades are the secret - you will spend longer doing this than conventional planes. I have three sizes now - 30, 40 and 60mm - the 60 is a real beast but does the job great. I'm not sure if anyone else has this one but for different wood, there is always one plane you have that works better than the rest. This can be different depending upon the wood.
I might suggest some strops ( throwing a real wobbly!!) - bits of soft leather with a backing board. If you charge these with a polishing compound like rouge, they are great at removing any burr built up using oil or water stones and create a mirror finish to the blade.
 


Haha,

remember in the East Japanese planes are conventional and Western planes are oddball. Once the kanna is set up it should not take long to sharpen it. Setting it up however takes a little know how.

Jason ,

Rather than struggle with trying to teach yourself to sharpen, go to a class or find a fine crafts person who is a high level furniture maker to teach you. Look around your area and see if there are wood working seminars you can check into. And comb you tube for sharpening ideas.

Sharpening is very personal and there are a myriad of ways to do it. The confusion of conflicting advice or too much advice might not be fantastic. Sharpening is a tactile skill that is learned best by watching someone do it and then having them show you how. Setting up a plane body has tricks to it that an old hand will be able to show you. May I recommend the public library section on wood working, try to find the books published by Fine Woodworker magazine on planes. There are long detailed articles on how and why planes work, reading this material will help you learn the concepts and terms of plane set up. Then find someone to help you learn and you will be talking the same language.

Prepping the plane body, and knowing how to prep each style of body, is vital and should come first in my opinion. Your blade could be sharp as hell but nit working at maximum function unless the body is tuned well. Any old swap meet, junk store, garage sale plane bodies you can get cheap will be good fodder for learning to tun up the body. That is where the plane literature in the Fine Woodworking books will come in.

And don't be afraid as Flaminggrae says to dive into Japanese pull planes, kanna, right from the start. But again get a teacher a don't muck around with bad technique, learn it bang up from the start.

EDIT' another thing is that modern planes from companies like Lee Valley or Lie Nielson are ready to go out of the box, those planes are tuned up more or less already, you could tweak them a tiny bit but they are mostly spot on. This is good if you want to sidestep the square checking and flattening of the plane sole. But you don't learn that skill from the ground up and thus miss out on transforming cheap old plane bodies into working tools. Lee Valley has a good line of planes if you want to go that route. I have a few myself.

Getting to your question about size for thicknessing, it depends on how fast you want to go. A bigger plane will hogg out more wood faster, but a smaller plane will still do the job. I began using smallish planes for thicknessing like Stanley 220's because of the control in final thicknessing. You can work a smaller area with a smaller plane. As it is now I use a 54mm Japanese plane for tops and Cypress and switch to a Stanley 220 to flatten the waves made by the belly in the plane iron. You may as well learn the blade is called a plane 'iron' in old time speak. Then I scrape to reach a final thickness. At this point I can use the Kanna pretty fast.

Fine,but for curly woods you should learn to make a toothed plane, Flamed Maple almost dictates the use of a toothed plane and many kinds of Rosewood are easier to handle with a toothed plane. So look into that idea. The toothed plane is a fail safe tool if you are working an expensive set of back and sides in a tough wood to plane out so even for rough thicknessing some woods the toothed iron is a good tool to use. It is a more conservative way of removing lots of stock but when you cannot afford any pullout on $300.00 or $400.00 set of back and sides conservative avoids heartache mistakes.

Next and in conjunction with plane irons, you gotta get into scrapers. For rosewood especially fun.

This is a solid book on the subject and the one I said may be in the library http://www.amazon.com/Fine-Woodworking-Planes-Chisels-Editors/dp/0918804280

There are others by good authors, James Krenov for one. Compare the info in these good books.

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 14 2016 3:47:13
 
JuanDaBomb

Posts: 189
Joined: May 18 2011
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

I like to work wood as a hobbyist using only hand tools. I was fortunate enough to have discovered Paul Sellers from when I first started.

If you want to learn fundamentally what it takes to fettle a plane, sharpen it, and set it up, check out his blog and his free videos both on his youtube channel and his website. You can find all that real fast with Google.

If your main goal is results, and you don’t want to burn through money experimenting on stuff, check him out first and foremost. Then, google for the stuff that’s on woodworking forums and whatnot for alternative ideas, if you want. BUT, I recommend you do NOT do it the other way around! Well, not unless you have money to burn. In that case knock yourself out.

I free-hand sharpen all my own stuff: plane irons, chisels, gouges, knives, spokeshaves, axe, auger bits, twist drill bits, hand saws, scrapers, kitchen knives, scissors, straight razor to shave my face with (I'll never use a cartridge razor again...), whatever it is. The mystery of it all, the intimidation, it all dropped off real quick for me.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 14 2016 9:41:42
 
estebanana

Posts: 8345
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

Juan you freak using straight razor, Ima scared of you now. Scarrded I tell you.

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 14 2016 12:13:45
 
Stephen Eden

 

Posts: 905
Joined: Apr. 12 2008
From: UK

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

A convo came up like this on the delcamp forum although it started off about thickness sanders. A plane recommendation came up there for a scrub plane for rough thicknessing. That might be worth a look at too.

_____________________________

Classical and Flamenco Guitars www.EdenGuitars.co.uk
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 14 2016 12:20:31
 
JasonM

Posts: 1830
Joined: Dec. 8 2005
From: Baltimore

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

Thanks to all for the info.

Andy, I will look into that non Bailey, Stanley plane. Seems pretty economical.

Japanese planes sound like they are well suited to lutherie over the heavy planes, although I more intimidated having less in person resources for help with them at the moment.

Stephen, I joined a local wood shop club that offers classes in both sharpening and a handtool class. I reckon i should take those. And they have an assortment of planes I can use borrow. But I want your opinions, not just furniture builders, even though the concepts cross.

I've totally dismissed hand tools as slow and arduous but was schooled at a wood work show recently on how enjoyable they can be. I got to use some Veritas and they defintely put a smile on my face but not on my wallet. A local flamenco builder uses the Veritas scraper plane after running the stock through a Wagner Safte T Plane on the drill press.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I was also under the impression that some hand tool skills are needed to build a guitar- or preferred knowlege at least, even though machines can do a lot of the work.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 14 2016 17:34:50
 
JasonM

Posts: 1830
Joined: Dec. 8 2005
From: Baltimore

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JuanDaBomb

Juan, yeah I know of Paul Sellers, I actually was considering making his workbench out of Framing lumber as a next project into woodworking. Regarding sharpening, I have a nice Japanese cooking knife which has a 15 degree convex bevel, which I found very intimidating to try on a stone for fear of ruining the shape. At least planes are a flat bevel.

In Fine Woodworking there was a recent issue on plane reviews. There Best Buy was a Veritas for value lol. They seemed to have high standards.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 14 2016 19:14:01
 
estebanana

Posts: 8345
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

The Vertias line get good reviews and I think as an out of the box product you get your hard earned monies worth. Some guys are snobby about it and prefer higher priced planes, but maybe, i think spending a lot of money can wait until later when you have more experience.

I've got my eye on this as my next plane and probably last western plane, but you never know. A 22" jointer,but I have a special use for it, to join cello backs.

http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=52414&cat=41182,52515


I might get a Lie Nielsen block plane someday, but I still cling to the Stanley 220 and smaller block planes that are lighter weight. For guitar making often the lighter plane body is more fun to work with. Some guys like the solidity of a chunky heavy plane and the security and precision, but try waving it over guitar braces for a while and your ram will get tired of controlling all that mass.

So there is a difference between furniture making an guitar making plane choice for me.

The small boat bodied Stanleys and the 101 block planes are fun to have. You can get them on eBay they are quite common and cheap, they get tuned up and handle brace shaping very well.

Here is a typical 102, beat up old, ugly, most people dis this model, but they are so inexpensive and fun. You could do a lot of guitar making with this one. the problem this plane has is that the cap iron breaks if you dail tension screw down like the Hulk. As long as you are tender to the capiron this plane will go and go.

The 102 is kind of like an old Volvo or Peugeot, the guy who drives one has one or two more in the front yard for spare parts... buy them two at a time in case you snap a cap iron or want to swap blades.

http://www.handplane.com/158/stanley-no-102-block-plane/

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 14 2016 23:43:32
 
mmenk

 

Posts: 23
Joined: Dec. 26 2015
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

Hi Jason,
You got some good advice so far. Pick up tools at garage sales, flea markets or make as many tools as you can, the older the better, and take the time to get to know them, sharpen and tune them, and most important, let them teach you how to best use them.
M.M.M.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 15 2016 3:19:55
 
estebanana

Posts: 8345
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

I looked around this website it is actually really cool.

http://www.handplane.com/

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 15 2016 4:16:05
 
Stephen Eden

 

Posts: 905
Joined: Apr. 12 2008
From: UK

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

I have the Lie Nielson 102 and it is brilliant. It's the only block plane I have. It fits snugly in my hand, it's not too heavy but heavy to help keep momentum and it's so easy to control when using it either 1 or 2 handed. I use my No.5 for everything that needs to be flattened and my 102 for shaping large areas.

If you enjoy cleaning up and sorting old tools out you can't go wrong with second hand. I have personally never seen any merit in doing so as I would much rather work with wood than metal. So I have bought the nicest tools I could afford.

_____________________________

Classical and Flamenco Guitars www.EdenGuitars.co.uk
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 15 2016 10:18:09
 
jshelton5040

Posts: 1500
Joined: Jan. 17 2005
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to Stephen Eden

I have a Lie Nielsen low angle block plane that I like quite a lot. The other planes in our shop never get used for guitar making. I used to have a coffin maker's plane (24" Bedrock) but never found a use for it so I traded it for some wood.

_____________________________

John Shelton - www.sheltonfarrettaguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 15 2016 14:36:52
 
Anders Eliasson

Posts: 5780
Joined: Oct. 18 2006
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

As an alternative you have this one:

https://www.dictum.com/en/tools/woodworking-metalworking/planes/traditional-chinese-planes/702954/smoothing-plane?ffRefKey=hiYKfzNwJ

It has a 40mm blade, has a small brass opening in front of the blade and a very small opening. Its made out of a heavy and hard chineese wood sort. Its very easy to flatten the sole and IMHO, its very pretty and sits very well in my hands. Its my favorite all times plane. Mine is 12 - 13 years old, has been used a lot and has only been levelled 2 times I think.

Personally, I find the typical size 4 or 5 Jack plane to be to heavy for working on guitars. I prefer something lighter but still big enough for 2 hand use.
Normally we think of chinese products as cheap crap, but there is a production of quality as well. And remember that the chinese woodworking culture may very well be older than the European and Japanese together.
This plane is a push/pull type, meaning that it can be used in both directions. It has the blade opening in the middle of the sole.



Images are resized automatically to a maximum width of 800px

Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Blog: http://news-from-the-workshop.blogspot.com/
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 16 2016 8:52:58
 
estebanana

Posts: 8345
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to Anders Eliasson

http://www.leevalley.com/US/Hardware/page.aspx?p=46322&cat=1,41182

You can get those at Lee Valley too. In China there a few more styles that are traditoinal, there is a push plane style that is 3000 years old. Or so I was told by a carpenter in China.

Here is whata I use in actuality for smoothing, Veritas bevel up Low Angle smooth plane.

http://www.leevalley.com/US/Hardware/page.aspx?p=51870&cat=1,41182,41187&ap=1

If you sharpen the iron with a extremely now double bevel on the blade this is the Death Star of modern smoothing planes, for under $300.00 it costs about $250.00 and the extra toothed blade is an additional $45.00/

This plane puts a French polish ready surface on rosewood. Or course it does not scrape bindings or wash windows. If the blade iron is correctly double bevel sharpened it will cut the minus tissue paper thick ribbons on spruce.


So Jack planes can pretty much do the same thing and the smoother, but the bevel up sharpened with a double bevel to boot is super nice.

_____________

I used to have a a nice plane collection, I kinda miss it, I had a few dozen wood planes some very sweet old molding planes for China and France. Planes are one of the few things I relish collecting, but hauling them around is difficult.

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 16 2016 11:54:48
 
estebanana

Posts: 8345
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to estebanana

This is from the Lee Valley website description of the low angle with the added double of micro bevel.


'The 12° bed angle, coupled with the 38° blade bevel, yields an effective cutting angle of 50°, often called York pitch. This is an ideal starting angle for minimizing tear-out on difficult wood. For the most difficult grains, even higher cutting angles (for creating Type II chips) can be achieved, either by honing the blade with a higher micro-bevel or using one of the optional blades below.'

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 16 2016 12:06:20
 
FERREREZAKI

Posts: 62
Joined: Jul. 10 2013
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JuanDaBomb

quote:

ORIGINAL: JuanDaBomb

I like to work wood as a hobbyist using only hand tools. I was fortunate enough to have discovered Paul Sellers from when I first started.

If you want to learn fundamentally what it takes to fettle a plane, sharpen it, and set it up, check out his blog and his free videos both on his youtube channel and his website. You can find all that real fast with Google.

If your main goal is results, and you don’t want to burn through money experimenting on stuff, check him out first and foremost. Then, google for the stuff that’s on woodworking forums and whatnot for alternative ideas, if you want. BUT, I recommend you do NOT do it the other way around! Well, not unless you have money to burn. In that case knock yourself out.

I free-hand sharpen all my own stuff: plane irons, chisels, gouges, knives, spokeshaves, axe, auger bits, twist drill bits, hand saws, scrapers, kitchen knives, scissors, straight razor to shave my face with (I'll never use a cartridge razor again...), whatever it is. The mystery of it all, the intimidation, it all dropped off real quick for me.


Thank you for the tip.
Just watched his bench plane restoration. Great stuff. Will check out his other videos too.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jan. 16 2016 21:17:37
 
Cervantes

 

Posts: 491
Joined: Jun. 14 2014
From: Encinitas, CA USA

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

I have been getting more into woodworking and consider myself an amateur.
I have a lot to learn still and have yet to build a guitar although I hope to someday.
I bought vintage planes off Ebay for very reasonable prices.
I have a Bailey no 4, no 6 and a small Miller Falls block plane.
I put a new Hock blade in the no 4, its far superior to the old Stanley blades and think its worth the cost. I use a honing guide to sharpen my chisels and plane blades, I don't trust myself doing it free hand. Like you I think the more you work with hand tools the better.

_____________________________

Ah well, there was a fantastic passion there, in my case anyway. I discovered flamenco
very early on. It grips you in a way that you can't get away - Paco Pena
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 3 2016 16:53:59
 
Vince

Posts: 141
Joined: Oct. 21 2012
From: Germany

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

You can make a plane in your shop!
Krenov Style smoothing plane, works perfect for thicknessing the Top.
Scrape wood from Guitar building and view hours for building.



Images are resized automatically to a maximum width of 800px

Attachment (1)

_____________________________

Vince
http://www.gitarrenbau-held.de/
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 15 2016 12:07:17
 
constructordeguitarras

Posts: 1564
Joined: Jan. 29 2012
From: Seattle, Washington, USA

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to jshelton5040

Although I have many planes, including some that I made, from my furniture-making days, I have four Lie Nielsen block planes, in three sizes, and they are so much fun to use that I hardly use anything else (except for my German-made large wooden jointer plane). The largest block plane has a heavy steel body and an adjustable throat, which is handy for dealing with difficult grain, and it is large enough to get two hands on. The fourth one is an extra medium-size bronze block plane with a toothing blade, which also sometimes comes in handy for dealing with difficult grain (I needed to use it on some Macassar ebony fingerboards).

Like Andy, I like a hollow grind. Once that is achieved, sharpening only requires removing metal from the tip and the heel of the curve, which I do on bench stones. I sharpen often; nearly every time I use a plane just to be sure.

_____________________________

Ethan Deutsch
www.edluthier.com
www.facebook.com/ethandeutschguitars
www.youtube.com/marioamayaflamenco
I always have flamenco guitars available for sale.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 17 2016 15:25:26
 
jshelton5040

Posts: 1500
Joined: Jan. 17 2005
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to constructordeguitarras

Ethan,
Do you use a strop? If you don't I think you'd be amazed at seldom it's necessary to use a stone.

_____________________________

John Shelton - www.sheltonfarrettaguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 17 2016 22:59:21
 
constructordeguitarras

Posts: 1564
Joined: Jan. 29 2012
From: Seattle, Washington, USA

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to jshelton5040

Thanks for that info, John. I don't but I should because I probably waste a lot of metal from my irons, as well as time. I have done it in the past with carving tools, because they come that way.

_____________________________

Ethan Deutsch
www.edluthier.com
www.facebook.com/ethandeutschguitars
www.youtube.com/marioamayaflamenco
I always have flamenco guitars available for sale.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 17 2016 23:05:01
 
Stefan Leon Kelly

Posts: 32
Joined: Jun. 29 2016
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

I use a Clifton no5 for many things, I find any longer then the plane is prone to warp ever so slightly & produce unpredictable results when jointing tops/backs. The cast iron & bronze react to temperature changes differently, add to that the tension of the cap iron & you have movement beyond control, the larger the plane the more sensitive. Clifton have done a good job of off setting this effect by adding more cast iron. Bare in mind its useful to have flat sides on a plane so you can flip it upside down & lock it into a vice, that way you can hold the timber rather than the heavy plane when more control is needed (carving the dome onto the back braces for example).

For thicknessing by hand I recommend making a violin makers graduation punch, with one of these you don't have to constantly pick up the top & measure the thickness as you go along, you can just get stuck in until the dimples are gone, very handy for fingerboards, back, sides etc. If you are thicknessing ebony this way fill in the dimples with talc so they are visible, (wear a cap if you have dandruff or you may end up with a veneer!) .If you use a grad punch a long plane is not essential for flatness as you can see where the high spots are, a smaller block plane works just fine, once the dimples are gone simply work over with a large sanding block then finish with a scraper.

As for sharpening I use the scary sharp method, sticky back lapping films on a 1/2" thick float glass lapping plate with Richard kell honing guides, no messing about levelling stones & much cheaper upfront (perhaps more expensive in the long run).

Here's my Graduation punch-



Images are resized automatically to a maximum width of 800px

Attachment (1)
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 29 2016 3:24:01
 
JasonM

Posts: 1830
Joined: Dec. 8 2005
From: Baltimore

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to Stefan Leon Kelly

Stefan, thanks for the tips and info. Since I posted this I picked up an old Stanley number 5 and a block plane, and stuff for the scary sharp method, and a couple of whetstones. Turned my sushi knife back to shaving sharpness, but I still need to get around to tuning up the planes.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 30 2016 16:23:47
 
Tom Blackshear

 

Posts: 2304
Joined: Apr. 15 2008
 

RE: What size plane for thicknessing (in reply to JasonM

Jason, I use a # 62 Stanely low angle jack plane. It works well for joining tops and backs, right out of the box with no sharpening needed.

But if you are using a plane to thickness the top then this is another animal you will have to struggle with as I don't know of any plane that is perfectly equipped without having to do some modification; however slight it might be.

I invested a long time ago for a barrel sander that does a fantastic job.

_____________________________

Tom Blackshear Guitar maker
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 6 2016 13:14:30
Page:   [1]
All Forums >>Discussions >>Lutherie >> Page: [1]
Jump to:

New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


Forum Software powered by ASP Playground Advanced Edition 2.0.5
Copyright © 2000 - 2003 ASPPlayground.NET

0.0625 secs.