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RE: Is it normal to feel that flamenco died with Paco?   You are logged in as Guest
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mrstwinkle

 

Posts: 292
Joined: May 14 2017
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to tk

Normal - yeah, seems to be. Correct? No idea.

I think the style needs another Almoraima moment to get out of the doldrums.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 17 2018 18:21:57
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7502
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to JasonM

quote:

Would Paco have released a new album in the future? Maybe, we will never know. but he was definitely winding down. 10 years between Cositas Buenas and Cancion andaluz. So it's possible flamenco would be no different


I speculate, but I think Paco would have probably released a few albums with him doing more straight ahead accompaniment of singers without large groups.

I also felt a loss more when Moraito died. I liked living in world were Paco and Moraito lived at the same time. And Fernando Terremoto dying young got me too. Some say Miguel Funi is the only old cante left. But that's how flamenco is right? Of course in Jerez Agujetas marks the end, but Lebrija holds onto Funi.

And really for most older aficionados is was when Fernanda died that things changed...

The great thing is, I have access to all the great recordings. And probably the things that bring me up the most are singers like Chocolate and Fernanda.
Moraito playing is like listening to high grade 80% cacao chocolate. I just wish the Mujerez album would go back into print.

The Fernanda- Bernanda disk with Paco del Gastor, on Ocora label, live concert in France. If you feel bad about flamenco, I recommend it as your cure.
Or Fernanda with whats his face cejilla choked up to fret 7 or 8. You figure it out

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 18 2018 1:29:56
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7502
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to mrstwinkle

quote:

We all have built-in cognitive biases. We over-evaluate what we have and under-evaluate what we don't have. In our minds, our wives are more beautiful than they really are, our kids are smarter than they really are, etc. Those biases extend to our musical tastes. The music of our teen years or the music of other salient moments in our lives was just so much better than everything else. Those biases serve a purpose and in many ways we should be happy we have them. I can certainly see the benefit of thinking your significant other is more beautiful than she actually is. What I don't understand is when those biases warp into a judgment of everything else. We're no longer saying that our wives are more beautiful. We're saying that everybody else's wife is ugly. An odd turn of events.

If you can't find quality music today, you're not listening hard enough. If it's all dying and there's no hope of adding anything of quality to what has already been done, then let's just call the whole thing off. If you don't think you can add anything worthwhile to what Reyes did, then throw out your tools and burn down the workshop. If you don't think you can add anything to what PdL did, then smash that guitar to pieces and use it for firewood. Better yet, bring the wood here, and we can put it all together in the middle of the foro and light it up, turn this place into a huge funeral pyre to grieve the past and contemplate our hopeless future. Let's wallow in our despair and enjoy every last drop of it. If everything is sh*t, then at least let's be honest and drop the whole thing. Some people really need to ask themselves why they're even here if they truly believe it's all sh*t. You've insulted every creative mind here by including what they're doing in the category "sh*t". Ricardo, John, Grisha, sorry to break it to you but your music is all sh*t and cheap. Stephen, Tom, Andy, Brian, Rob, sorry to break it to you but your guitars are all sh*t and cheap. Or maybe we can set up a cut-off age. If you're older than X, you're fine. You're part of the dying but great. If you're younger than X, you're sh*t. What should that age be? 50? That's a nice round number. Let's go with that. Some of you are off the hook (can I hear a collective sigh of relief?). The rest of you, say it together now: "we're sh*t". Olé!


Mi cago en tu leche, toma que,,,,, toma, que toma..........Ole!

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 18 2018 1:35:38

Piwin

Posts: 2174
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to estebanana

When I was a teenager and read Hemingway's "For whom the bell tolls" for the first time, long before I started to learn Spanish, I was very confused at all the occurrences of the phrase "I sh*t in the milk".

_____________________________

"When I'm dead, I'm going to forget everything – and I advise you to do the same."
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 18 2018 6:53:20
 
mrstwinkle

 

Posts: 292
Joined: May 14 2017
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to estebanana

quote:

Mujerez album



That a Moraito album? Curious what this is?

For me, the death of Moraito was probably a bigger loss than Paco - but just a personal preference thing.

But - I only got into flamenco 4 years ago. So I feel a bit like teenageers do when oldies bleat on about the good old days before smartphones
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 18 2018 10:21:01

Piwin

Posts: 2174
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to mrstwinkle

He played accompaniment to several cantaoras on that album. La Macanita, Dolores Agujetas and another one whose name I forget.

_____________________________

"When I'm dead, I'm going to forget everything – and I advise you to do the same."
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 18 2018 10:40:08
 
Escribano

Posts: 5862
Joined: Jul. 6 2003
From: England

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to mrstwinkle

quote:

For me, the death of Moraito was probably a bigger loss than Paco


I had a beer with Moraito, so it affected me more personally, I think.

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Foro Flamenco founder and Admin
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 18 2018 12:03:11
 
mrstwinkle

 

Posts: 292
Joined: May 14 2017
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to Piwin

Got any links? My google skills are failing to find it.....


edit - scrub that. Failed to spot the s/z play on words. Duh!

Tis on Spotify - other artist is Juana la del Pipa.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 18 2018 14:18:50
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7502
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to mrstwinkle

Let me now if you find it anywhere else. I don't use Spotify.

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https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 18 2018 15:25:07

Piwin

 

Posts: 2174
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

[Deleted] 

Post has been moved to the Recycle Bin at Apr. 18 2018 15:51:50
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 18 2018 15:40:56
 
mrstwinkle

 

Posts: 292
Joined: May 14 2017
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to estebanana

It can be bought as mp3 on play.google.com.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 21 2018 21:43:52
 
Shroomy726

Posts: 1327
Joined: Jun. 5 2005
From: Argentina (living in U.S.)

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to mrstwinkle

Personally, a part of me did die with Paco's passing. I definitely see a before and after. He was an incredible influence in my flamenco journey and was one of my favorite parts of the art. The way he "led" the modern guitar revolution in flamenco is incredible and indisputable. He was a very heavy influence on other flamenco musicians as well as musicians from all other genres around the world. Besides his composing abilities and deep knowledge of flamenco roots, his practice routine and regiment just created an absolute monster technical player and creator. The extremely high bar he set for himself as a musician elevated the whole art and music in general. That bar is now set forever, musically, and luckily, now visually too.

I have heard in interviews after his death that he had several albums in mind after Cancion Andaluza and that he was really gonna start pouring into composing/recording rather than performing on stage especially due to the old age.

I think not having him produce those extra albums did kill flamenco a little. He tended to "lead" the pack especially when it comes to expanding the boundaries. I would have loved to see new creations. He was pretty good at innovating and fusing without taking it too far. Now the dogs are loose!! lol

One thing I will say is that I see promise in the world and I do still hear plenty of musicians that are doing fantastic stuff. Talking flamenco specifically, people are still creating incredible new pieces. I've been watching Antonio Rey practice a lot lately and that guy is a beast both as a player and as a composer. Really looking forward to seeing his evolution. I also keep discovering other great music outside of flamenco. A few months ago I discovered an album by New Orleans local Allen Toussaint from 2009 called "The Bright Mississippi" (I highly recommend it). I heard it playing on a record store down in Magazine street and had to ask the people working who it was. Downloaded the album when I got home and was shocked at how good it was and it's from less than 10 years ago!! Yet it has that old school New Orleans jazz vibe! And that's just one example. Good music is still being made, people! Just gotta hunt for it.

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Gracias Paco por la música que nos diste. Me cambiaste la vida y nunca lo olvidaré. Que en paz descanses.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 31 2018 2:15:40
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 2576
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to Piwin

quote:

ORIGINAL: Piwin

When I was a teenager and read Hemingway's "For whom the bell tolls" for the first time, long before I started to learn Spanish, I was very confused at all the occurrences of the phrase "I sh*t in the milk".


I grew up with Spanish as a second language. I spent every summer on the ranch in south Texas. Of the 21 families on the ranch, mine was the only one that spoke English at home. My best buddy was the grandson of the foreman. I spent as much time in his house as I did my grandparents'. His parents made us speak 'correct' Castellano with an 'educated' Mexican accent of course, no Tex-Mex.

We had to know Tex-Mex, since that was about all some of the people spoke. It's not an ignorant nor limited language, it's just a dialect with a long history and consequent expressive power. It developed among the colonists of Nuevo Santander, founded in the 1680s along both sides of the lower Rio Grande. I remain very poor at Tex-Mex.

When I read "For Whom the Bell Tolls" as a teenager my ears burned with embarrassment at Hemingway's clumsy English translations of Spanish idioms. To my ears the idioms simply didn't translate. They were parts of a different way of speaking.

All these years later, if I try to write out a translation of a passage in Spanish, I struggle with idiomatic expressions. For many, if not most, there isn't any way to say it in English with the same meaning, connotation and weight.

It goes in both directions, especially when faced with translating into Spanish the colorful English idioms of the southern and southwestern USA that I grew up with.

"He's all hat and no cattle." "Well, that took the rag off the bush." "Money talks. Bullsh1t walks."

However, even in a redneck bar these days you probably won't hear the openly racist ones that were part of everyday speech in my Texas youth.

In my Maryland high school there were some different racist idioms, and a new dimension for me: class. A day didn't pass without hearing someone say, lightly and teasingly, "Why, you common dog." "Common" was a frequent disparagement.

It was not that there were no class distinctions among white people in Texas. You just didn't express them verbally without risking being called out to defend yourself.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 31 2018 6:18:54
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 2576
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to Shroomy726

Congratulations Shroomy!

With Allen Toussaint you have lifted the lid on a treasure chest of New Orleans music: the Neville Brothers, Professor Longhair (Henry Roland Byrd), Doctor John (Mack Rebennack), Fats Domino....

When I was a kid I had a bunch of 78 rpm records of the 1920s jazz bands. Someone threw them away when vinyl LPs came out. I got them before the garbage man did. Wish I still had them.

I taught at LSU for a few years in the early 1970s. We made it down to New Orleans when we could. You could still go to Tipitina's and hear Professor Longhair....the band, without the Professor, would start off the evening, and go on and on. Still no Professor. When you were about ready to get up and stomp out, a couple of the musicians would get up and go get the Professor. They would bring him in, a frail old man leaning on a person on each side of him. They would fiddle around and get him seated at the piano.

Then the Professor would turn around, grin, and proceed to blow the roof right off the joint for the rest of the night. Often they stayed open for an hour or two after the posted closing time. The Professor never broke a sweat.

One of my good friends was from New Orleans. I asked him why, in one of the most musical cities on the planet, the symphony orchestra was no good. He replied that one of his uncles spent $20,000 every year on Mardi Gras (in the early '70s!). Not much money left over for the symphony, art museums and the like.

I don't know what it's like now, but then the only match anywhere for Mardi Gras in New Orleans was Carnaval in Rio de Janeiro.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 31 2018 8:16:29
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 2811
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to Richard Jernigan

quote:

I grew up with Spanish as a second language. I spent every summer on the ranch in south Texas. Of the 21 families on the ranch, mine was the only one that spoke English at home. My best buddy was the grandson of the foreman. I spent as much time in his house as I did my grandparents'. His parents made us speak 'correct' Castellano with an 'educated' Mexican accent of course, no Tex-Mex.


As I have noted before, my family (who were all anglos on my mother's side) has a deep history in Mexico, moving to the States in the 1930s when Mexico nationalized the oil industry and the railroads. I have always been interested in Spanish and have studied it in its various forms when assigned to countries such as Chile, Honduras, and Colombia, not to mention the Mexican connection.

In all cases, however, I can determine whether or not someone is speaking "correct" Spanish by his use (or lack of use) of the subjunctive. In Spanish, one uses the subjunctive probably 50 to 60 percent of the time. In English we hardly use it at all. Someone can be speaking Spanish and to the untrained ear sound "fluent," but if he is not using the subjunctive correctly, he will be understood but he is not speaking correct Spanish.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 31 2018 13:30:08

Morante

 

Posts: 1409
Joined: Nov. 21 2010
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to BarkellWH

quote:

I can determine whether or not someone is speaking "correct" Spanish by his use (or lack of use) of the subjunctive.




I had spent 10 years in Cádiz before meeting the woman of my life. She did not speak English, but soon pointed out that I used too many subjunctives in speech. She put it down to too much time spent in juergas with gitanos, who, it seems, overuse the subjunctive.

This never bothered me: one of my favourite letras is de Pies de Plomo: "Si no fuera por mi hermano, hubiera muerto de hambre".

Communication is more important than being correct.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 31 2018 16:24:38
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 2811
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to tk

No, I do not think it is normal for a true aficionado to feel that flamenco died with Paco, anymore than it would have been normal to feel that flamenco died with the death of any of the great tocaores and cantaores of the past: Ramon Montoya, Nino Ricardo, and my favorite, Sabicas; not to mention La Nina de los Peines, Fernanda and Bernarda de Utrera, Terremoto, and others. While Paco pushed boundaries and was a technical wizard, he was standing on the shoulders of those who went before.

In my opinion, Paco began to dilute flamenco, at least the flamenco that I have always enjoyed, when he introduced "alien" instruments into his group such as a bass guitar and a harmonica. Nevertheless, flamenco still lives in spite of Paco's death. What I think will eventually kill flamenco in perhaps 20 years will be its absorption by "World Music" to the point where it will be unrecognizable as true flamenco, and it will be performed by a guitarist from Mali.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 31 2018 16:25:48

Morante

 

Posts: 1409
Joined: Nov. 21 2010
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to Richard Jernigan

quote:

Allen Toussaint


Allen died a short time ago. He was a great pianist, composer, arranger and godfather of New Orleans music, responsible for the success of many artists.

I still have vinyls of Doctor John, Prof Longhair, Fats and Ernie K Doe. Once saw Rebennack live in the University; absolutely riveting.

Still love that New Orleans swing.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 31 2018 16:31:17
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 2811
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to Morante

quote:

Communication is more important than being correct.


Communication and speaking correctly in any language are not mutually exclusive. I have never been in a Spanish conversation where someone was not understood as a result of correctly using the subjunctive. Of course, if someone uses the subjunctive where it is not called for, he is using it incorrectly, but that is a different matter.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 31 2018 16:31:38
 
Ricardo

Posts: 11055
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to BarkellWH

quote:

In Spanish, one uses the subjunctive probably 50 to 60 percent of the time.


Well, so be it.

quote:

In English we hardly use it at all


What a niggardly use of perfectly fine grammar options.

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www.ricardomarlow.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 31 2018 19:14:07
 
Leñador

Posts: 5225
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to mrstwinkle

quote:

What a niggardly use of perfectly fine grammar options.


We are cancelling the Ricardo show.

(I know it's real word before the English police jump on me.)

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\m/
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 31 2018 19:36:28
 
mark74

Posts: 690
Joined: Jan. 26 2011
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to mrstwinkle

Uh oh....here comes Don Lemon and CNN
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 2 2018 19:58:01
 
Ruphus

Posts: 3736
Joined: Nov. 18 2010
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to BarkellWH

quote:

ORIGINAL: BarkellWH

What I think will eventually kill flamenco in perhaps 20 years will be its absorption by "World Music" to the point where it will be unrecognizable as true flamenco, and it will be performed by a guitarist from Mali.

Bill

Maybe like with that girl from Mali who has been pushed to stardom in Germany, doing some sort of remotely blues resembling, lame three chords one-trick-pony in ways any musically mediocre teenager with a dud in the house used to in the rich decades. She appears to have been picked by the suits for her hair cut and that "World Music" touch.


To my ears there is truth to all the different aspects mentioned in this thread.
The major ones in my opinion being the ones of limited variable with 12 notes, sensual scarcity and dependent personality.

# Composition
The great plains of harmonically varying 12 notes have been grazed in the unique creative period of ~ 1965-1982 or so. And that in such ideal ways that it equals an extreme challenge to come up with something new yet musically pleasing. Actually, it is close to impossible to create something beyond given discography. There is not much more left than doing a good job with second hand sequences and with as much personality as possible.

# Personality
Decades of anemic creativity, monotony and undemanding trash have left not only measurable marks on generations like lost inability with distinguishing audible tones and shades of colors, but there has also been effects on personality.

First of all through topically restricting didactics aimed at releasing industrial work horses who provide processing skills of specialists without abstraction abilities of coherent thinking (potential rebellion).
A fact much to the regret of enthusiastic and demanding university professors who resigned before the lethargy, lacking creativity and dependency of today´s students. ("Which topic should I chose, Professor?", "You should go out seek and find a question or challenge by yourself." "How do I do that?")

Secondly through Hollywood´s norm across the globe. With youth imitating a small range of movie characters (No matter how unrealistic those may have been.)
[Thus one of the extremely rare criteria that I found positive in that Middle Eastern place, was a still broad and natural range of individual expression and style which appears to have been preserved due to having missed out on decade´s mainstream movies to jointly copy gesture and expression from.]

Educational system and culture product having led to vastly colorless and personality-lacking generations. Common characters who, even if you´d put them into a time machine and sent them back to ungrazed times couldn´t be as expressive and perfectly creative as the remarkable artists and composers of that period.
Those again in childhood might have had a meager toy shelve, no gadgets and just the kids of the block to play with, (and at school more holistic / unspecialized lecture) yet just the more fantasy and inspiration to toy with.
-


There is a series of TV-concerts on German television called "Baloise Session", apparently presenting the shizznizz of these days. Thankfully, at least hand-made stuff. No rap or techno crap.

However, any producer of the seventies would had told these artists to go home, first rehearse a whole lot more and try to come up with something evolving, varying, vivid, unique ...

Compare this "Baloise" thingy with "Rockpalast" of the old days. Man, that used to be excitement, ... a muscial explosion, ... orgasm rocking the hall. With half of the republic, armed with beer and stickies, staying awake until morning hours to watch that event on TV.

At least seen by the commercially popular offer of these days: The charts and scene now are so incredibly anemic and pale; utterly disappointing and really saddening.

And that counts for the whole of popular art and culture, which altogether mounts to severe decline and disaster of human culture development.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 3 2018 11:39:23
 
sartorius

Posts: 188
Joined: Mar. 7 2017
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to mrstwinkle

With YT students don't even pick up the score in classical music academies and "cut and paste" what they see with no personality, just trying to copy what they see. This is the "I like" generation that likes (or doesn't like) a lot but thinks or studies very little. This is also the indoors generation that prefers to stay at home than go and see others playing and get inspired. In such a way music is just dying slowly within the younger generation while the older generation holding the mastery and secrets of great music is also dying slowly but surely. Concerts offered live in pubs and public places are often cover groups playing rather dully what used to be great music of the time. Classical music concerts are attended by the same people who go to church, those aged 45 to 85+. Video games + soccer world cup + Facebook= dumbest generation ever. What will be left soon?

Also see Author Mark Bauerlein's new book, "The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future" .
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 3 2018 16:44:06

Piwin

 

Posts: 2174
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

[Deleted] 

Post has been moved to the Recycle Bin at Jun. 3 2018 19:28:35
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 3 2018 18:40:09
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 2811
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to Piwin

quote:

If that Malian guitarist can play Sabicas like Javier Conde or Paco de Lucia like Grisha or if he can accompany baile and cante like Ricardo, then who gives a **** where he's from? The harder part is with cante. There indeed it seems incredibly hard to find the real deal amongst foreigners. But guitar? Anyone can play "true flamenco" no matter where you're from, at least the simple stuff. It's just guitar.


If the guitarist from Mali 20 years from now could do as you state above, I would say more power to him regarding his playing flamenco. But that's not what I wrote in my original comment. Just to be clear, I repeat my comment below.

"What I think will eventually kill flamenco in perhaps 20 years will be its absorption by "World Music" to the point where it will be unrecognizable as true flamenco, and it will be performed by a guitarist from Mali."

Rather than playing flamenco as we understand the genre, my guess is that the Malian guitarist will not be playing flamenco. Rather, he will be playing "World Music" after it has absorbed flamenco, rendering it (flamenco) unrecognizable as a separate genre and thus diluted out of existence.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 3 2018 19:28:58

Piwin

Posts: 2174
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to BarkellWH

Oops. Sorry I must have deleted my previous comment while you were replying. I decided after posting that I would be better off staying out of this one (the whole generational talk of the two previous posters, basically saying "it's hopeless there's nowhere left to go from here" gets on my nerves, especially since I'm surrounded by some astounding young musicians who surprise me every time I listen to them).
But that was a fair correction on your part. Apologies for having misunderstood your point.

_____________________________

"When I'm dead, I'm going to forget everything – and I advise you to do the same."
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 3 2018 19:40:20
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1540
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to Richard Jernigan

quote:

All these years later, if I try to write out a translation of a passage in Spanish, I struggle with idiomatic expressions.


It’s the dimunitives that floor me. For instance (IIRC) a casita is a nice little house, and so is a casilla; but a casucha is a hovel? (or is it just a dump? Or a MacMansion?) and I think there are few others as well.

If someone can point me to an explanation of all this, I should be grateful. It’s not something you find in the standard grammar books…
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 3 2018 21:59:47
 
sartorius

Posts: 188
Joined: Mar. 7 2017
 

RE: Is it normal to feel that flamen... (in reply to mrstwinkle

Casucha is a small house but with the difference (casita, casilla) that it looks more like a slum...
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jun. 5 2018 18:02:01
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