Foro Flamenco
Posts Since Last Visit | Advanced Search | Home | Register | Login

Today's Posts | Inbox | Profile | Our Rules | Contact Admin | Log Out



Welcome to one of the most active flamenco sites on the Internet. Guests can read most posts but if you want to participate click here to register.
This site is dedicated to the memory of Paco de Lucía, Ron Mitchell, Guy Williams, Linda Elvira and Philip John Lee who went ahead of us too soon.
We receive 12,200 visitors a month from 200 countries and 1.7 million page impressions a year. To advertise on this site please contact us.





What was your personal journey that brought you to Flamenco?   You are logged in as Guest
Users viewing this topic: none
  Printable Version
All Forums >>Discussions >>General >> Page: [1]
Login
Message<< Newer Topic  Older Topic >>
 
Gabewolf

 

Posts: 67
Joined: Feb. 12 2016
From: Cleveland, Ohio

What was your personal journey that ... 

Hello! I was wondering if anyone wanted to share their stories about finding this music and what drove them to start learning how to play flamenco.

Growing up I was exposed to 70s and 80s punk rock music, my favorite band being the politicized and genre bending group: The Clash. On their 1979 release "London Calling" there is a track titled Spanish Bombs about poet Fredrico Garcia Lorca and his assassination during the Spanish Civil War. This drew me to Spanish culture and eventually to flamenco to the point of needing to learn to play this music. By this point I had already been playing guitar for over a decade, styles ranging from punk, blues, folk and reggae, but none of these prepared me for the complexities and addiction I would experience with flamenco guitar.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 12 2016 15:59:13
 
Ricardo

Posts: 11960
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

It's a good question, though it's come up in the past:

http://www.foroflamenco.com/tm.asp?m=264139&p=12&tmode=1&smode=1

_____________________________

CD's and transcriptions available here:
www.ricardomarlow.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 12 2016 16:04:51
 
Gabewolf

 

Posts: 67
Joined: Feb. 12 2016
From: Cleveland, Ohio

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Ricardo

Ah cool! I'll have to check that one out.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 12 2016 16:14:04
 
Aretium

Posts: 277
Joined: Oct. 23 2012
 

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

Paco!!!


To which he would reply "Que?!"
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 12 2016 17:43:12
 
Piwin

Posts: 2795
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

I took the back door to flamenco, through rumba catalan.

I used to play second guitar at church when I was a kid, and there was a lot of rumba or at least techniques derived from rumba that were involved. I'd heard some flamenco palos but they were few and far between as is often the case with French gypsies.

I stopped altogether after I left the church. My disbelief had, for all intents and purposes, led to me getting kicked out of my home and most of that community so I had a good dose of resentment in me to not want to do anything that reminded me of them and what had transpired.

The next few years are more a story of struggling through poverty while working my way through university but that's another story.
After I had finally made it to a job that paid and that I could declare tax-wise and after a few years of an excessive and paranoid saving frenzy, I finally decided to spend some of my cash on something I wanted to do. It turns out figuring out what you want to do is rather difficult when you've spent years focused on other objectives that are fairly removed from the notion of wanting or self-realisation and when your main drive is more along the lines of "I'll show them, survive and make it in life". So I asked around. Finally opted for Spain upon recommendation of a close friend.

And I went to Spain for a month and kind of just fell into a flamenco environment by chance. Literally by chance, since I travelled that month by taking whatever first bus was leaving the station. This involved arriving in Sevilla on the first night of Semana Santa without a book roomed...But that too is another story. The rest involves Learning from people in Salamanca, Sevilla, Granada and now Madrid. Let's just say that when you come from a rumbero environment, you're likely to feel pretty comfortable with flamenco. You won't necessarily know how to play it, but it'll make sense to you.

I still kind of shudder when asked to play rumba catalan. I guess the first cut is the deepest after all.

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 12 2016 18:16:44
 
Cervantes

 

Posts: 440
Joined: Jun. 14 2014
From: Encinitas, CA USA

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

I started playing music very young, my parents made a huge mistake and chose clarinet which I played from 12 years old until college. I got interested in jazz and played saxophone for a awhile. At this time my exposure to flamenco was basically zero. I had heard of PDL only because he was playing with Al Dimeola and John McLaughlin. In my 30's I decided to start playing guitar and bought a classical guitar and took lessons for about a year before getting bored with it. Over the following decades I tried different types of guitars and styles including Hawaiian slack key on a steel string acoustic, jazz on a electric archtop with an amp. Never really progressed at anything. Sold all of my guitars except a nice classical. At some point I went to a concert that had 4 top guitarists of different style. The most impressive one was Joe Pass, Paco Pena was also there but we were so far from the stage and could barely hear or see him play so it didn't leave much of an impression on me at the time. I am now 59, about 3 years ago I was going through a bad spell with my health and took out my classical guitar and somehow stumbled onto some music that was flamenco sounding and something just clicked. I had always thought of flamenco as this exotic and impossibly difficult thing to play on a guitar. One thing led to another and I bought a blanca and found a teacher. Its amazing the progress I have made in past few years and I have confidence it will continue as long as I am motivated and focused. I have a much better understanding of flamenco now but still have so much to learn about the music and culture. Its really become an important part of my life and I feel fortunate to have discovered it.

_____________________________

Ah well, there was a fantastic passion there, in my case anyway. I discovered flamenco
very early on. It grips you in a way that you can't get away - Paco Pena
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 12 2016 18:27:14
 
Piwin

Posts: 2795
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Cervantes

quote:

Its really become an important part of my life and I feel fortunate to have discovered it.


Hear hear! I'll drink to that. Cheers!

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 12 2016 18:30:01
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3020
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

In 1960, my parents gave me a guitar for my 17th birthday. It was during the folk music boom of the late 1950s and early 1960s--The Kingston Trio; Peter, Paul, and Mary; The Limelighters; Ramblin' Jack Elliot; Harry Belafonte; and others (Bob Dylan and Joan Baez had not come into their own yet). I loved folk and learned to play three and four chord progressions which enabled one to play hundreds of folk songs. At the same time, I was introduced to flamenco by Carlos Montoya. He performed in Phoenix, Arizona where I was living, and I bought several of his albums. I loved flamenco guitar, but knew nothing about flamenco, other than I loved the sound of the flamenco guitar.

I went to the university, spent a few years in the U.S. Air Force, and eventually entered the U.S. Foreign Service and the State Department. Most of my career was spent in Maritime Southeast Asia, with several assignments to Latin America and Washington, DC. While I took my guitar with me everywhere, I did not advance beyond what I knew during the folk boom. After retiring from a career in the Foreign Service (while still doing some consulting work for the State Department overseas and with a Defense Department contractor), I decided I wanted to learn flamenco.

So, at an age when most people are thinking of where they want to retire and play golf, I found a great flamenco guitar teacher in Washington, DC named Paco de Malaga. Paco teaches flamenco guitar, and his wife Ana teaches dance. I have been with Paco now for several years, and we are not only teacher and student, but my wife and I have become good friends with Paco and Ana as well.

Through my relationship with Paco, I have learned some nice pieces on the guitar, and more than that, I have learned a great deal about the history of flamenco and the great figures that it has produced. Paco was a very good friend of Paco de Lucia (As a boy, he studied flamenco guitar under Paco de Lucia's father and his older brother, Ramon de Algeciras.) At my age, and considering my late start, I will never be a first-rate flamenco guitarist or even a very good one, but I enjoy playing and it is fun to entertain friends. And the friendship I have with Paco de Malaga is worth its weight in gold. Flamenco has added a whole new dimension to my life, and I am grateful for having had the opportunity to pursue it.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 12 2016 21:11:19
 
at_leo_87

Posts: 3055
Joined: Aug. 30 2008
From: Boston, MA, U.S.A

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

interesting stories!

mine is quite boring. saw a video of paco on youtube and that's it. i was changed forever.

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 13 2016 2:19:50
 
Leñador

Posts: 5229
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

Hah yup! Mines pretty lame too. Played thrash/death metal since 12 or so. Was dating a girl who had a Yamaha classical guitar she never touched so I would mess around with it. Around that time someone showed me a Rodrigo y Gabriela video(oh the shame) so I was like "Hey, I should learn flamenco". Then I started digging and finding the truth. I've always been a do it 100% no posers kind of person so I abandoned the fakemenco forever and started taking lessons.
Now I live with a plywood and mirrors living room and regularly argue about compas with student dancers. I wouldn't change a thing though.

_____________________________

\m/
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 13 2016 3:20:51
 
Piwin

Posts: 2795
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Leñador

quote:

someone showed me a Rodrigo y Gabriela video(oh the shame)


I used to really enjoy listening to them. Sure it's nothing complicated and a lot of it is just covers, or very heavily influenced by other songs, but it had a nice vibe to it.

And then there was that music festival we're we almost booed them off stage after Gabriela called the entire audience a bunch of *ssholes for no apparent reason. I forget her exact words but that was the gist of it...

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 13 2016 13:41:48
 
Leñador

Posts: 5229
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

Haha hilarious.
They're a bit of a clever short story that got stretched into a novel. They're collection is a bit like one long song.
The worst is when people see me in a slayer shirt and find out I play flamenco they will always say "Oh you must LOVE Rodrigo y Gabriela!" They're so excited I don't wanna be an elitist dick so I just change the subject or say "well, I'm really more into singing..."

_____________________________

\m/
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 13 2016 14:16:38
 
etta

 

Posts: 295
Joined: Jan. 20 2010
 

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

At age 14 in l955 I bought a Sears/Roebuck arch top steel string guitar ($29.95) and proceeded to learn to play. I had always been attracted to the sounds and chord progressions of Spanish music. Then I bought my first Carlos Montoya album, followed by many others by both Montoya and Sabicas. My guitar did not look right or sound right. On a whim I called information, New York City, for Carlos Montoya. Sally Montoya answered, I apologized for the intrusion, but asked for information about where and how to buy a real flamenco guitar. She offered to sell me a Hernandez y Aguado blanca; I accepted the offer. I had never seen a real flamenco guitar. When it arrived by rail to Tennessee, in 1959, I was amazed at the sound, beauty, and craftsmanship of what I later learned was a world class guitar. I struggled with no teacher, no instruction book and with only the sounds from my record player of Montoya and Sabicas. Sadly, I sold the guitar in l975, but the sounds never left me and I came back to the music in 2008. I have many fine guitars today, but I am still looking for the H y A with the inscription inside, "especial para C. Montoya" and signed by the makers. This site has been of invaluable help for me to become a much better player. I will try to enclose a photo of a college concert,1963, with the Montoya guitar. Thank you all. Jack



Images are resized automatically to a maximum width of 800px

Attachment (1)
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 13 2016 15:40:11

Morante

 

Posts: 1442
Joined: Nov. 21 2010
 

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

I remember in school, there were two camps; Beatles and Rolling Stones. I was for the Stones which led to Chuck berry, Leadbelly etc.

In University I started a rock and roll band which played in all of the student funcions and even opened for Cream. When the group disbanded, I decided against buying a steel string guitar and playing Irish music: we were in full civil war mode and Irish music was played for a public who were mostly carrying guns.

Then Manitas came to town and gave an impressive concert. Afterwards I found a Lp of him and his cuñado José Ballasteros sang. I was not over fond of Manitas but the cante of José impressed me.

Unfortunately the only flamenco records on sale locally were of Camaron and Paco. I didn´t really like either of them, but eventually found artists such as Manuel Soto and Melchor.

It was cante which convinced me and provoked my move to Andalucía, where I did not learn to be a guitarrista, but I learned about cante and how to accompany.

Now that my great friend and guru, José Millán, has passed away, I have stored my flamenco guitar in a wardrobe and have returned to playing Blues. I have lots of flamenco records but never listen to any of them. I only listen to cante en directo. At home, Muddy Waters or Elmore James
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 13 2016 16:05:42
 
Echi

 

Posts: 782
Joined: Jan. 11 2013
 

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

Etta, I have read on the Urlick book (A collection of fine Spanish guitars) that H&A made very few flamenco guitars in their career.
I suppose very few of them must be around in the USA. The book shows also the all the measures of the listed HeA guitar.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 13 2016 18:56:46
 
bbfifas

 

Posts: 27
Joined: Sep. 29 2016
From: Vero Beach, FL

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

In my 30's, have limited guitar experience and always admired flamenco videos and the few live performances I have seen. Said what they heck let me try to stimulate the brain and learn something new. A few months in an I am learning something a little by little everyday. My goal is by the time I am 40 I might be able to play some pieces ;)
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 13 2016 19:10:04
 
Leñador

Posts: 5229
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

quote:

My goal is by the time I am 40 I might be able to play some pieces ;)

Or, if you're like me, you'll realize playing pieces is no longer you're goal.

_____________________________

\m/
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 13 2016 20:32:32
 
Ricardo

Posts: 11960
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Leñador

quote:

ORIGINAL: Leñador

Haha hilarious.
They're a bit of a clever short story that got stretched into a novel. They're collection is a bit like one long song.
The worst is when people see me in a slayer shirt and find out I play flamenco they will always say "Oh you must LOVE Rodrigo y Gabriela!" They're so excited I don't wanna be an elitist dick so I just change the subject or say "well, I'm really more into singing..."


Hmm, I have no probs telling folks that ask that THEY SUCK!!!

_____________________________

CD's and transcriptions available here:
www.ricardomarlow.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 14 2016 5:29:16
 
Piwin

Posts: 2795
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Leñador

quote:

They're a bit of a clever short story that got stretched into a novel


Well put. That's exactly it.

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 14 2016 7:40:10
 
Arash

Posts: 4409
Joined: Aug. 9 2006
From: Iran (living in Germany)

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

.
.
.
<<---------- this dude here

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 14 2016 16:23:59
 
Leñador

Posts: 5229
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

quote:

Hmm, I have no probs telling folks that ask that THEY SUCK!!!

Hahaha depends on situation for me. If it's mixed company at my lady's work party or something I'm more koi. If it's anything musician or flamenco related I'll say what I really think. They're a bastardized gimmicky version of rumba catalan.

_____________________________

\m/
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 14 2016 17:21:06
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3020
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to BarkellWH

To those like Aretium and Arash, who describe their personal journey to flamenco in one word, "Paco," I have a question. Do you mean that you never knew anything about or came to flamenco before Paco, and after discovering him he cemented your love of flamenco? Or do you mean you listened to Paco's predecessors--Sabicas, Nino Ricardo, Ramon Montoya, and others, and you just didn't like flamenco as they played it, and it was only after Paco came along that you found a brand of flamenco you liked?

It's just interesting to me that one contemporary artist could lead to a love of flamenco without reference to the many flamenco guitarists who preceded him.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 14 2016 18:24:54
 
Aretium

Posts: 277
Joined: Oct. 23 2012
 

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to BarkellWH

quote:

To those like Arethium and Arash, who describe their personal journey to flamenco in one word, "Paco," I have a question. Do you mean that you never knew anything about or came to flamenco before Paco, and after discovering him he cemented your love of flamenco? Or do you mean you listened to Paco's predecessors--Sabicas, Nino Ricardo, Ramon Montoya, and others, and you just didn't like flamenco as they played it, and it was only after Paco came along that you found a brand of flamenco you liked?

It's just interesting to me that one contemporary artist could lead to a love of flamenco without reference to the many flamenco guitarists who preceded him.


Good question.

1. Exposure, many more paco videos on youtube and girlfriend from malaga
2. I come from classical/jazz background with some oriental stuff too, whether that matters at all
3. I didn't like paco at first so much, his music was more abstract and i listened to a few sabicas, paco pena recordings at first to grasp basic flamenco EDIT: didn't mean basic, but more "roots"
4. Then I started to like Paco and then started to fall in love with him haha
5. Then I started to stop listening to anything before sirocco aside a few pieces
6. Now I don't listen to more jazz and fusion but when I listen to flamenco it is either camaron or late paco.

It is weird how the ear evolves and likes and dislikes change.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 14 2016 18:37:34
 
Arash

Posts: 4409
Joined: Aug. 9 2006
From: Iran (living in Germany)

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to BarkellWH

quote:

ORIGINAL: BarkellWH

Or do you mean you listened to Paco's predecessors--Sabicas, Nino Ricardo, Ramon Montoya, and others, and you just didn't like flamenco as they played it, and it was only after Paco came along that you found a brand of flamenco you liked?

It's just interesting to me that one contemporary artist could lead to a love of flamenco without reference to the many flamenco guitarists who preceded him.

Bill


I didn't know any of the players you mentioned before Paco.

But I knew Ottmar Liebert


So bascially yes. Paco opened the door.

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 15 2016 21:11:57
 
frhout

 

Posts: 441
Joined: Apr. 28 2005
From: France

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

I was given a tape with Sabicas on one side, Manitas de Plata and Christopher Parkening on the other, in 1975. From that time, and thanks to Sabicas, flamenco is forever. The recording in question was Art of the Guitar (or Flamenco on Fire). I still have that tape.



Images are resized automatically to a maximum width of 800px

Attachment (1)
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 16 2016 11:52:11
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1655
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to frhout

quote:

The recording in question was Art of the Guitar (or Flamenco on Fire).


The Art of the Guitar was the original title. It’s since been re-released under at least eight (8) different titles, and anthologised so many times it makes your head spin — so many that I can’t help wondering if it’s somehow gone into the Public Domain.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 16 2016 17:09:03
 
edguerin

 

Posts: 1531
Joined: Dec. 24 2007
 

[Deleted] 

Post has been moved to the Recycle Bin at Oct. 17 2016 10:03:56
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 17 2016 10:01:02
 
frhout

 

Posts: 441
Joined: Apr. 28 2005
From: France

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Paul Magnussen

Yes, I bought Art of the Guitar recently to replace the Flamenco on Fire as I found the few repeats annoying. I had no idea who Sabicas and Manitas were at the time but I did notice the music and style are very different.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 17 2016 10:04:21
 
edguerin

Posts: 1531
Joined: Dec. 24 2007
From: Siegburg, Alemania

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

Here's my original post from 2009:

_____________________________

Ed

El aficionado solitario
Alemania
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 17 2016 14:37:05
 
flamencoLVR

 

Posts: 26
Joined: Apr. 27 2015
 

RE: What was your personal journey t... (in reply to Gabewolf

In the early 60's, age 20, I kept hearing from my Coffee House acquaintances about a great guitar player named Sabicas. I found out that Sabicas played at a restaurant in San Gabriel,
here in Southern CA. My wife and I had the privilege of listening to Sabicas and Mario Escudero play duets while Mario's beautiful wife Anita Ramos danced. I bought the famous
Sabicas and Escudero vinyl album in the lobby off of the "Rincon Room" Around that time, my mother-in-laws ex-cop friend Dale Alexander opened a coffee shop in
Downey where a pianist played flamenco and a dancer performed. Dale had a nice singing voice and played folk songs and flamenco. Freddy Noad , classical guitarist, often
performed there too. Dale sold me a Martin classical 0018G guitar and taught me some flamenco basics. I also learned the folk tunes that were popular at the time. I have been
a big fan of flamenco ever since. I enjoy listening to all the flamenco artists on You Tube, thanks to all who post flamenco videos and music. I love most flamenco, classical and other
guitar music including Chet Atkins and Mark Knopfler. I bought a Cordoba F7 basic flamenco guitar recently but had carpal tunnel problems, cured by surgery, now I can try to learn
more flamenco. Still have the old Martin 0018G.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 31 2016 18:24:24
Page:   [1]
All Forums >>Discussions >>General >> Page: [1]
Jump to:

New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


Forum Software powered by ASP Playground Advanced Edition 2.0.5
Copyright © 2000 - 2003 ASPPlayground.NET

0.078125 secs.