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WHere and From Whom Did You Learn Flamenco? Can It be Done Online or Youtube/DVD if Necessary?   You are logged in as Guest
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Quill

 

Posts: 46
Joined: Nov. 2 2013
 

WHere and From Whom Did You Learn Fl... 

Well, I'm closer to finding a guitar (see other thread fro update) but finding a guitar teacher is weirdly difficult in my area. I'm about 90 miles from New Orleans, and my hometown of Baton Rouge is well known for blues and rock bands. Yet I could find only three teachers in the area, and all live pretty far from me, and it would take a lot of gas (petrol to you Europeans) to get there. None of them actually teach flamenco thoug some are willing to try.

So, I have found a few actual flamenco teachers on Skype. Can a total guitar newbie, or in act anyone, learn flamenco via Skype? It seems to be my only option. I could try traditional music on a classical if Skype isn't a good idea, but Skype would be cheaper than driving to the other side of town. not to mention that I'd have an actual flamenco teacher to boot.

So how did you learn?

Teacher, picked it up from family or on the streets, Youtube VDS, or live teacher via Skype?

Would any of you be willing to PM me about good teachers on Skype?
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 4:44:51
 
flyhere

Posts: 121
Joined: Dec. 17 2012
From: California, USA

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

Hi Quill,

If you don't mind, could you share how much the teachers are asking for an hour of instruction? including the Skype one. I live in Southern California and it's pretty tough to find a flamenco teacher as well, and would like to compare against a Skype teacher somewhere else.

Thanks
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 5:11:08
 
Quill

 

Posts: 46
Joined: Nov. 2 2013
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

Sure. I found a few for $65-75 an hour or so, which is a stretch tomy budget. I found a teacher who has 1/2 classes for $33 which for me might be the way I go. Weekly, to keep me going but affordable at $33 a lesson. The others believe that 1/2 hour is too short, and that set up will seriously eat into the short lesson.

By comparison, I found a local non-flamenco teacher for $100 for four hourly sessions. Cheaper for the lesson but way more costly on gas.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 5:21:04
 
Quill

 

Posts: 46
Joined: Nov. 2 2013
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

I see Neotriz beat me to the punch on this one. Sorry.

Still, can you tell me about your opinions on teaching yourself with media or leaning on Skype?
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 5:24:14
 
Tomas

 

Posts: 22
Joined: Aug. 16 2013
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

quote:

None of them actually teach flamenco thoug some are willing to try.


Don't bother with these people. If they don't know flamenco, they can't teach it. It's not something any guitarist can just pick up and start teaching within a few weeks of practice, no matter how well versed they may be in other styles of music.

Learning from a teacher is always the best option. If you can't find one, try Skype. I have no personal experience with this, but it seems like the next best option. I believe there are some teachers on this forum who offer lessons via Skype.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 9:56:58
 
flamencositar

 

Posts: 76
Joined: Aug. 8 2012
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

I take Skype lessons with Ricardo Marlow and I am a newbie in the arte of flamenco guitar. Absolutely worth every penny! Sr Marlow records the lessons and I watch them over and over again. I see huge progression in my technique and understanding of the art form. Sr Marlow is an amazing teacher with much depth. The lessons, like everything in life, is what you make of them.

I agree with others, one on one with a teacher is the best way to go, but Skype is working out well for me so far...

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Still the body, quiet the mind, free the soul
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 13:00:20
 
tri7/5

 

Posts: 547
Joined: May 5 2012
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

I think Skype is a good choice once you already know some basic guitar as the teacher isn't going to have to worry about you not knowing what a G chord is or that you even know how to hold a guitar and can talk about more detailed matters. I think it would be a bit tough to not be in front of someone as a complete beginner trying to learn basic chords, ergonomics, strumming etc. since there is much more physicality involved in the beginning stages of guitar in just getting your body used to playing. In any case, Skype is a very viable option.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 13:41:00
 
Anders Eliasson

Posts: 5780
Joined: Oct. 18 2006
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

quote:

The others believe that 1/2 hour is too short, and that set up will seriously eat into the short lesson.


I´m paying 40$ for half an hour of top level Irish fiddle skype lessons. He gives me a bit more than half an hour and setup doesnt take away any time. Its just a video call and hello how are you, I´m fine, lets play..
Prepare yourself on using skype. Call some friends and play and talk. Ask them how it sounds. Download a skype recoriding software and ask the teacher for a first free lesson just to say hello and see if everything is working. The free setup lesson is pretty standard and I think Ricardo offeres that as well.
I would have no problems asking Ricardo to give me lessons. During the 10 years we´ve been here, he´s proved to be very pro and I can only believe his lessons will be like that as well.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 15:12:41
 
keith

Posts: 1108
Joined: Sep. 29 2009
From: Land of Daniel Boone

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

quill, did you try the baton rouge classical guitar society? there may be teachers through that organization. i learned flamenco as a raw beginner and had a teacher who was very hands on which was very helpful for me to learn the fundamentals. i think skype is a good resource if one has the fundamentals down but it is the fundamentals that often require a live hands on person.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 15:40:12
 
Quill

 

Posts: 46
Joined: Nov. 2 2013
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

Hey guys, thanks for the great suggestions.

Flamencositar and Anders, did you guys already have a basic knowledge of your instruments before you began Skype lessons?

tri7/5, I do agree with you about it being better to learn the basics in person. If I can't get a local flamenco teacher, would I get correct hand and body positioning from other acoustic instructors. the Skype teachers I talked to seem confident they can still teach me online, but I would feel better in person.

Keith, thanks for that great link! I found the site and fb sites. I left messages. It's still small at only 18 followers on fb and the site's not up yet, but it seems the best lead I've got. I hope they can help or lead to some help locally.

Thanks again for the advice guys.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 17:44:33
 
Arash

Posts: 4432
Joined: Aug. 9 2006
From: Iran (living in Germany)

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Tomas

quote:

ORIGINAL: Tomas

quote:

None of them actually teach flamenco thoug some are willing to try.


Don't bother with these people. If they don't know flamenco, they can't teach it. It's not something any guitarist can just pick up and start teaching within a few weeks of practice, no matter how well versed they may be in other styles of music.




Fully agree. One $75 hour with a real flamenco guitar teacher is much better than Ten 5$ hours with those "who want to try". "I'm not a flamenco teacher but i want to try" simply means : i have no clue, but will gladly take your money and teach you whatever you want.

Not only you wont learn proper flamenco guitar techniques/compas/ect., you will learn wrong and bad habbits and a lot of fakemenco stuff. Specially in your case where (as far as i understood) you don't play any guitar at all, as a student you are a "virgin", so don't ruin it by learning bad habbits which you then would have to break again later. Start with the real deal.

Of course all i said is based on the assumption that you actually REALLY WANT the real deal and not only some spanish sounding stuff and chords.

Agree that Ricardo is an excellent choice. Ask him if he has some time left for lessons.
Remember, as a teacher not only you have to be a good player but also a good TEACHER. There are good players out there who can't teach good.
Also some skype teachers who dont speak english.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 18:00:13
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

quote:

would I get correct hand and body positioning from other acoustic instructors.

No, the way classical guitarist holds the instrument is different from flamenco as well as folk, blues etc etc I don't doubt that at that classical guitar society there may be a guy that knows a lil about flamenco but if there's not a skype flamenco teacher is better then an in person not flamenco teacher. (assuming you want to learn flamenco)

Here's the thing, if you DO learn flamenco, other styles of music will be very easy to learn, that does not work vice versa though. Learning flamenco with even years of other guitar under your belt is hard.

quote:

Also some skype teachers who dont speak english.

Ricardo??? Come to think of it, I've never HEARD him speak........... hmmmmmmm

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 18:03:41
 
tri7/5

 

Posts: 547
Joined: May 5 2012
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Leñador

quote:

ORIGINAL: Lenador

Here's the thing, if you DO learn flamenco, other styles of music will be very easy to learn, that does not work vice versa though. Learning flamenco with even years of other guitar under your belt is hard.


Hardly, think a flamenco guitarist can navigate the changes in Coltranes Giant Steps just because they play flamenco? Think they can hold a pick and go note for note with Jason Beckers Serrana arpeggios? They wouldn't even know where to begin just as a jazzer wouldn't know where to begin in flamenco and would have to start from scratch. Things like jazz, rock, blues all sort of meld together at times so if you can do one you can move to another decently though theory-wise they will be slightly different (think fusion). It's all western culture music thus has similar roots. Flamenco is its own beast.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 18:30:25
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

Moving from those to flamenco is harder then vice versa, I maybe shouldn't have used the word easy but I can guarantee Becker would have a harder time with a Tomatito bulerias then vice versa.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 18:51:15
 
flamencositar

 

Posts: 76
Joined: Aug. 8 2012
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

quote:

Flamencositar and Anders, did you guys already have a basic knowledge of your instruments before you began Skype lessons?


Yes. I have been playing for many years now, but I approach my lessons with Ricardo as a complete newbie and total dumbass. Why? Because I don't want my biases (right or wrong) effecting my endeavour to learn a new style. So I purposely dumb myself down in order to get to the pureness of flamenco.

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Still the body, quiet the mind, free the soul
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 19:38:54
 
Erik van Goch

 

Posts: 1787
Joined: Jul. 17 2012
From: Netherlands

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to flamencositar

quote:

ORIGINAL: flamencositar
I have been playing for many years now, but I approach my lessons with Ricardo as a complete newbie and total dumbass. Why? Because I don't want my biases (right or wrong) effecting my endeavour to learn a new style. So I purposely dumb myself down in order to get to the pureness of flamenco.

Being a guitar teacher myself, various times i undertook a 40 hour rebirth session applying exactly that state of mind. Those were the moments i learned more then i could have imagined in my wildest dreams.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 20:05:08
 
chester

Posts: 841
Joined: Oct. 29 2010
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Leñador

quote:

I can guarantee Becker would have a harder time with a Tomatito bulerias then vice versa.

Dude, you can't seriously believe this stuff right?

You can guarantee it?

Have you seen the clip of Vicente playing electric guitar? I don't think he'd be able to pull off any Dream Theater anytime soon. I can't see Diego del Gastor improvising over Giant Steps either.

Flamenco guitar is great and focusing on it sure did expand my guitar capabilities, but it's not the 'best' or 'hardest'. There's no such thing.

As for OP - you live in the south. OF THE USA. Not Spain. You're so far from flamenco. It's ok to be interested in it, but unless you're planning on moving to andalucia you're always going to be struggling to 'get it'. Just get a guitar, learn chords, scales, some easy songs (House of the Rising Sun, etc), throw in some Solea and Alegrias falsetas and you'll be happier than you can imagine. Flamenco isn't your end-all-be-all unless you're a gypsy from spain.

I understand you've caught the flamenco 'bug', but try to think clearly and you'll save yourself a lot of regrets down the road such as an expensive 'made-for-flamenco' guitar.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 22:07:10
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

quote:

Dude, you can't seriously believe this stuff right?

You can guarantee it?


Totally, for a flamenco to learn something not flamenco WILL take less effort then for a non-flamenco to learn a flamenco song.

Ask Petrucci to pick his hardest song and ask Tomatito to pick his hardest, let them switch music, I'd put money down that Tomatito would come back ready first. It may even take months but I'd still guarantee he learns it first.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 22:39:49
 
chester

Posts: 841
Joined: Oct. 29 2010
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Leñador

quote:

Totally, for a flamenco to learn something not flamenco WILL take less effort then for a non-flamenco to learn a flamenco song.

Music is music. Some people learn fast, some take longer.

I'm not talking tomatito and petrucci now (it's like superman vs batman). There are plenty of 'just-ok' flamenco guitar players that can accompany dancers and singers. Saying that they can switch over easier than a pro session player who plays different styles (depending on the project) and nail it on the first take for a living is ridiculous.

Flamenco isn't something alien. Bulerias compas is 6/8 followed by 3/4, with a 3 over 2 feel. The thing to get is to emphasize the remate and you're good (if you're familiar with those concepts).
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 4 2013 23:41:45
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

I'm comparing top level to player to top level player fair trade.

If you wanna take a "just okay" flamenco player and compare him to a "just okay" electric player I'm sure you'll get the same results.

Seeing as there is no numerical way to rank guitar players that'd be tough to do so I'm sticking with Petrucci vs Tomatito, the tomatoes got it……

quote:

(if you're familiar with those concepts).

Either you don't read my posts or you're being rude………...

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 5 2013 0:25:17
 
chester

Posts: 841
Joined: Oct. 29 2010
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Leñador

quote:

Either you don't read my posts or you're being rude………...

I was just speaking generally, not implying whether YOU'RE familiar or not.

I think you're being short-sighted and your enthusiasm for flamenco (aka fanboy-ism) is clouding your judgment. The world aint b&w like that.

I also think (based on your posts) that you're at a stage where you value technique over everything else . I don't discount flamenco players' chops, but music is much more than that. I don't think Tomatito can come up with strong melodies like Petrucci can, and both of them can't make a bassline bounce like bootsy collins can.



'Best' is not about coming up with the most sophisticated and challenging to play tunes. It's more about getting people to bob their head and whistle the melody after you've stopped playing.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 5 2013 2:07:04
 
Erik van Goch

 

Posts: 1787
Joined: Jul. 17 2012
From: Netherlands

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to chester

quote:

ORIGINAL: chester

Flamenco isn't something alien. Bulerias compas is 6/8 followed by 3/4, with a 3 over 2 feel. The thing to get is to emphasize the remate and you're good (if you're familiar with those concepts).

Actually the only 2 flamenco styles with a 6/8-3/4 pulse are Guajiras and Peteneras.

To an outsider (like you and me) bulerias is generally felt in pulses like 12-3-/6-8-10 (for no other reason then it's a concept we are familiar with) but for Paco Peña (for instance) EVERY compas of bulerias starts on beat 1 with 2 silenced beats.

I agree flamenco isn't the golden ticket that automatically allows one to play everything one likes. How easy it is to learn other styles of music depends on your personal qualities and compatibilities rather then your musical background. Tomatito will probably struggle to learn to play himself a 1 string indian raga that is agreeable for insiders. I met a 15 year old with zero experience in flamenco who could play everything i showed him instantly. Rasgueado? no problem..... accentuating 1 note out of 6? no problem, a top level alzapua? he produced it instantly. He also was the multi time youth champion in a rare style of martial arts and became champion among the adults as soon as he was allowed to join that competition. My father had a brilliant student of classical guitar who would have had no problem learning flamenco very quickly if he wanted to do so. When he was asked to play the banjo part in a student performance in front of 1500 people he did not practice in front but lend my fathers banjo, entered stage unprepared and played his part on an instrument he didn't know, in a tuning he never played before wile reading the score in a different key and keeping track with the orguestra. Don't see Tomatito do this. The hardest part of learning new music is understanding/reproducing it's musical language and flamenco is not the only style of music demanding years of experience.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 5 2013 2:18:05
 
z6

 

Posts: 225
Joined: Mar. 1 2011
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Erik van Goch

quote:

but for Paco Peña (for instance) EVERY compas of bulerias starts on beat 1 with 2 silenced beats.


Again Erik; a million thanks for that. I have great ignorance but would it make sense for my foot to tap only the silent beats? Because it does that itself but stops when I 'look'.

What's a remate? (Sorry)
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 5 2013 4:06:27
 
chester

Posts: 841
Joined: Oct. 29 2010
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to z6

It's the end of a phrase/section.
Usually comes on the 10. Then there's a short pause until the 12 (or 1, however you'd like to call it).
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 5 2013 6:37:53
 
chester

Posts: 841
Joined: Oct. 29 2010
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Erik van Goch

quote:

Actually the only 2 flamenco styles with a 6/8-3/4 pulse are Guajiras and Peteneras.

To an outsider (like you and me) bulerias is generally felt in pulses like 12-3-/6-8-10 (for no other reason then it's a concept we are familiar with) but for Paco Peña (for instance) EVERY compas of bulerias starts on beat 1 with 2 silenced beats.


I'm not an expert on guajiras nor peteneras, but I would say the compas is the same but not the soniquette. They're both a little more square with the himeola while bulerias has more of the 3 over 2 feel and you can interchange and omit each 'half' if everyone else plays along nicely (or doesn't notice ).

I don't understand what you meant about Paco Pena always beginning on the 1. Can you elaborate?

quote:

To an outsider (like you and me)

Outsiders to flamenco, maybe. But rhythm is universal. A pulse is a pulse and if you know how to play around with one you'll have an easier time playing around with others.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 5 2013 7:01:22
 
tri7/5

 

Posts: 547
Joined: May 5 2012
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to chester

quote:

ORIGINAL: chester

As for OP - you live in the south. OF THE USA. Not Spain. You're so far from flamenco. It's ok to be interested in it, but unless you're planning on moving to andalucia you're always going to be struggling to 'get it'. Just get a guitar, learn chords, scales, some easy songs (House of the Rising Sun, etc), throw in some Solea and Alegrias falsetas and you'll be happier than you can imagine. Flamenco isn't your end-all-be-all unless you're a gypsy from spain.

I understand you've caught the flamenco 'bug', but try to think clearly and you'll save yourself a lot of regrets down the road such as an expensive 'made-for-flamenco' guitar.


There's nothing that says flamenco can't be enjoyed or played by everyone. You don't need to live in spain to do it and not everyone is trying to be a professional at it. There are some awesome players who don't live in Spain and plenty that live here in the states. They all get it. I live in the south and am perfectly happy knowing that my flamenco playing will likely not be heard by anyone outside my immediate family or the internet world should I post a video. I live in basically one of the music and guitar capitals of the world in terms of electric and steel string. I could take the easy way out like you said and not push myself to learn something different but I intentionally sold all my electrics so it would force my hand at flamenco. I was never going to learn it without full dedication. Guess what?!?!?!? I am getting it slowly, surely, with practice and constant immersion.

So that being said to the OP I would recommend ignoring the above advice and finding your own path.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 5 2013 12:23:06
 
n85ae

 

Posts: 865
Joined: Sep. 7 2006
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

This is probably the statement that fits a lot of us best.

Regards,
Jeff


quote:

There's nothing that says flamenco can't be enjoyed or played by everyone. You don't need to live in spain to do it and not everyone is trying to be a professional at it. There are some awesome players who don't live in Spain and plenty that live here in the states. They all get it. I live in the south and am perfectly happy knowing that my flamenco playing will likely not be heard by anyone outside my immediate family or the internet world should I post a video. I live in basically one of the music and guitar capitals of the world in terms of electric and steel string. I could take the easy way out like you said and not push myself to learn something different but I intentionally sold all my electrics so it would force my hand at flamenco. I was never going to learn it without full dedication. Guess what?!?!?!? I am getting it slowly, surely, with practice and constant immersion.

So that being said to the OP I would recommend ignoring the above advice and finding your own path.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 5 2013 14:50:27
 
rickm

 

Posts: 446
Joined: Jan. 23 2004
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

who was it that said the best way to learn how to play flamenco is to listen to a lot of flamenco. What I have found the hard way and I have been around great guitars and bands my whole life is that frequently you will learn how George plays the guitar and not music, not style not the mechanics you need to employ to be able to play. At some point after hearing a tune you do need to be able to pick up yr instrument and translate what you heard to music. It works with rock it works with classical and it works with flamenco. A good teacher is worth their weight in gold but the problem is always finding the teacher. And a lot of guys sad to say don't want to pass on what they have learned and yr still stuck at some point making it work for you. And you must remember that if yr from the states, flamenco is a alien sound all we hear is rap, rock and techno pop so its a different way of listening to and playing music. One must adapt one's brain to those subtle differences.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 5 2013 17:16:48
 
rickm

 

Posts: 446
Joined: Jan. 23 2004
 

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to Quill

let me say this further. the old saw in blues is that white people cant play the blues. yet there are a lot of accomplished white blues players. Is there a subtle cultural difference? There might be but it might be based in our discriminatory eye rather than in reality. John Lee Hooker used to say you cant play the blues unless the guitar has been in the pawn shop twice. But regardless, anyone can play anything if they can listen and adapt wht they are hearing to their own playing whether its blues or flamenco or chopsticks. Will you be great? to be honest there are a billion great guitar players. If you can make yourself happy, shoot for that goal.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 5 2013 17:20:49
 
Erik van Goch

 

Posts: 1787
Joined: Jul. 17 2012
From: Netherlands

RE: WHere and From Whom Did You Lear... (in reply to z6

quote:

ORIGINAL: z6

quote:

but for Paco Peña (for instance) EVERY compas of bulerias starts on beat 1 with 2 silenced beats.


Again Erik; a million thanks for that. I have great ignorance but would it make sense for my foot to tap only the silent beats? Because it does that itself but stops when I 'look'.

What's a remate? (Sorry)

It's funny to realize that despite the world famous pulse "--3--6-8-10-12" it came as a complete surprise to me as well to discover that Paco plays every possible melodic pulse of Bulerias ON TOP of that INNERLY felt pulse (i only was told this fact last month). Obviously i knew that "in the old days" bulerias did indeed start on beat 1 (so did the falsetas, heading for beat 3) but over time the melodic start shifted to beat 12 more and more up to a point that for an outsider it might feel like the actual (or if you like alternative) beginning of the compas (my father thinks this shift into a long-long-short-short-short pulse actually is a regrettable form of globalization corrupting the once unique character of bulerias into a pulse practised by many cultures).

At precent day many melodies in bulerias start on beat 12 rather then on beat 1 and personally i just go with the flow, feeling beat 12 as the actual start of the compas. I was very surprised to hear that Paco's inner compas does not go with the flow but that he still feels 1 as the start of the compas every single time. Paco believes one should be able to feel/execute multiple rhythmic lines simultaneously, so while his hands fallow the accents dictated by the music his INNER compas start every compas on beat 1 and his foot might produce yet another pulse :-). Unlike Paco i'm not able to feel the compas starting on 1 myself when the pulse start on 12, i simply go with the flow.

Foot taping is a very personal thing. Personally i go with the flow, others favor a 2 beat pattern (even when the melody fallows a 3 beat pulse) and Paco de Lucia often taps the pulse **-**-**-**- (**3**6**9**12) which already comes close to tapping the "silenced beats" only. Like i said, it is possible to combine various ideas simultaneously and Paco drops all lines on top of feeling /1,2>3--6-8-10-12/. You can try it Paco's way or just embrace whatever works for you (like i do with mixed results).

As remate is concerned, i'm no hero in knowing/using the official terms practiced by many others, but i believe remate can be seen as a kind of musical PS, adding an extra tail to a line that already has come to an end. So in stead of closing a musical chapter right away one adds an extra compas, often loaded with energy.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 5 2013 20:19:34
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