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Andrew

 

Posts: 34
Joined: Dec. 25 2008
 

GAL Reyes plan 

The Reyes flamenco guitar drawn for the GAL magazine shows the rib width the same from heel block to waist to tail block. This is the first flamenco guitar I've seen were the sides do not vary in width.

Is there a reason for this? Is it to simplify the construction? Or is this done for sound reasons????
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 20 2010 5:20:31
 
Andrew

 

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Andrew

Ooops, my mistake.

The side width does taper from tail to heel. The plan is drawn with uniform width ribs but the list of dimension specify a taper. I was measuring of the plan.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 22 2010 2:19:10
 
Tom Blackshear

 

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Andrew

quote:

ORIGINAL: Andrew

Ooops, my mistake.

The side width does taper from tail to heel. The plan is drawn with uniform width ribs but the list of dimension specify a taper. I was measuring of the plan.


Also, the neck is drawn level with the box for simplicity, due to the computer's difficulty in making the drawing of the top bend a little between the 12 th fret and bridge, but it is actually raised a bit at the nut for string clearance that uses an even thickness fingerboard from the nut to the 19th fret. Most professional builders know how to treat this.

All you do is put a straight edge on the top, at the front of the bridge to the 12th fret and you get a litte clearance from the top of about 1/16th of an inch or about a little over 1 mm at the 19th fret. The top will normally bend a little. Just remember that the fret board goes totally flat from the nut to the top edge of the sound-hole.

To set the neck angle straight with the sound hole, you can lower the upper bout on each side just a bit, but keep it fairly even with the top's placement regarding the bridge.

Now that you are totally confused, seek out someone who knows this technique............:-)

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 22 2010 9:27:18
 
estebanana

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Andrew

quote:

o set the neck angle straight with the sound hole, you can lower the upper bout on each side just a bit, but keep it fairly even with the top's placement regarding the bridge.


I don't understand this. Why lower the top on either side of the fingerboard? That is what I get from this sentence.

If it's meant to explain how the fingerboard fits into the forward pitch of the neck and stays at a constant plane. There are easier ways to explain it.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 22 2010 14:02:56
 
Tom Blackshear

 

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to estebanana

quote:

ORIGINAL: estebanana

quote:

o set the neck angle straight with the sound hole, you can lower the upper bout on each side just a bit, but keep it fairly even with the top's placement regarding the bridge.


I don't understand this. Why lower the top on either side of the fingerboard? That is what I get from this sentence.

If it's meant to explain how the fingerboard fits into the forward pitch of the neck and stays at a constant plane. There are easier ways to explain it.


I drop the sides just a little to cause the top not to bend too much on its outside edges going toward the bridge from the top of the sound hole. The actual Reyes had convex harmonic bars going across the top but I kept mine flat going across. I think it gives the guitar a little better look to taper drop off on the upper bout edges a little. Miguel Rodriguez had done this on occasion.

Anyway, please explain your way of doing it.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 22 2010 14:50:39
 
estebanana

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Andrew

Tom, I'm trying really hard to understand what you're talking about and honestly I can't figure it out. I know if you're confusing me you're likely confusing the other fellow too.

If you're talking about subtle points of top geometry that deal with convex and flat harmonic bars I understand that. But my take on it is really simple and I never have had any reason to change the height of the ribs as they address the top.

When I asked Gene about the convex vs. flat harmonic bar issue he gave me a few pointers and options to consider:

1. You can leave the bar below the sound hole dead flat and you make the bar above the sound hole dead flat.

2. You can arch the lower harmonic bar and leave the upper one dead flat.

3. You can arch both upper and lower, but then you have an issue fitting the fingerboard because it's higher than the surrounding the area and arched under the portion close to the sound hole and flat at the area where the neck joins the top. ( Crazy problems. )

4. Make the bar under the sound hole slightly convex and give slight concave relief, like a hair, to the upper bar so the fingerboard is not riding on a hump.

And so on.

I've looked at several guitars with convex lower harmonic bars and have come to the conclusion that you just have to make the fingerboard comfortable by either making the upper bar dead flat or giving it a minute amount of concave relief.

I build from a plane that is constant around the perimeter of the top, if I elect to make the lower harmonic bar slightly arched I simply let it rise from the geometric plane of the top. I've never seen or had any need to violate the integrity of the top plane to accommodate 'bends' in the top.

I noticed a long time ago that if you cut the ledge in the neck block for the top and compensate in the angle of the ledge to allow the top be in it's natural plane you can keep the top from being cranked or flexed between the sound hole and the neck. A tension I like to keep out of my guitars, although some people just cut he ledge flat and don't bother.

If you're meaning the idea that the waist is narrower and the ribs need to be higher to make contact with the top; so you relieve the rib height just below and above the waist to allow the top to conform to the arch of the top and possibly a convex arched lower harmonic bar, I never do that.

I want the top to be in at flat plane and the back to taper from heel to butt against that plane. I will relieve the ribs on the back side to allow the back to contact the ribs higher at the waist than at the upper and lower bouts because this helps reinforce the arch. However I do it very slyly and with subtlety so the back looks like, and in fact really is, in a tapered plane in relationship to the top.

I would never lower or raise the rib height to allow the top to contact the ribs in some way that changed the plane of the top. That is what people who build in a radius dish do do and I deplore that look. Also because Eugene taught me to build the top to a plane on the solera and he would disinherit me as his student if I went against that. It would be like playing Monopoly and getting the Go to Jail Card! Do not pass go, do not collect 200.00.

For the purpose of teaching, if I ever do that, I would make the student draw the model in both profile and plan view and explain these ideas with an eye towards building the most direct model utilizes the solera as the constant ground plane that every thing rises from. I think it's too confusing to get into anything else for a first time builder.

Or perhaps I've just shown my complete ignorance of guitar making. In that case I plead as Rosanne Rosanna Danna did on SLN after an ignorant gaff stemming from a long diatribe..........

Oh, never mind....

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 22 2010 16:27:34
 
Tom Blackshear

 

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to estebanana

quote:

Tom, I'm trying really hard to understand what you're talking about and honestly I can't figure it out. I know if you're confusing me you're likely confusing the other fellow too.



I never do anything the easy way :-)

Actually Reyes glued his bars a little convex to accommodate the rise of the neck at the nut, which was about 2.5 mm. All I did was relieve the upper bout sides a little to flaten out the top rather than have it looking sucken in going across the top at the sound hole area.

This can be accomplished by tapering down away from the fret board area around to the outside edge of the upper bout. There is so little adjustment that it isn't that noticeable. But there is a concave appearance going toward the bridge from the sound hole area in the middle of the top.

The Reyes fret board had a little over 1/4" thickness from the nut to the 19th fret.

Gene and I have talked about this before and he understands that you can have slightly concave braces across the top if needed.

And as you suggested, there are several ways to build it. My way is to build flat across the top and slightly relieve the upper bout edges. BTW, I install my tops in a mold, right side up. I don't use a solera as I can see better how to put different top angles, and this watches out for the stress factor as well.

My tops are consistantly flat with a little rise across at the bottom end block which I build by tapering up with solid lining at the bottom block, about 1/16" around from the bridge line which is flat across the front of the bridge.

Then I put a little wood filler on top of the end block. A slight bend in the middle fan braces at the botton of the top will raise the top a little more to compensate for a low bridge, but the top is totally flat across in front of the bridge, and slightly domed behind the bridge due to the slight tapering around the sides toward the bottom. I do not, under any circumstances, build a dome under the bridge.

This isn't for beginners :-)

In other words I slightly relieve the top at the sound hole and slightly build it up at the end block. I do this very similar to the Reyes style but with a slight relief at the upper bout so as to accommodate flat bars across the top instead of building concave bars. I think it makes for a nice appearance.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 1:26:12
 
estebanana

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Andrew

Tom,

With all due respect to how you build do you honestly expect a first time builder to use that route? It's a little sneaky too if you already know that conventional Spanish style building means top down on a solera.

I understand the difference between a "flat top" which I associate with some later makers after Santos and what most people refer to as the domed top of a Torres. I can make both of those styles face down on a solera with the top in plane with the solera. ( not to mention the other variations like dropping the tail end of the guitar by building up the butt end of the solera.) There are a few ways of pushing the geometry around, but you always have to pay the piper somewhere else, and with that in mind don't you think showing a beginner something fairly esoteric like your method would confuse basic issues ?

I'm not saying your geometry is wrong, but if the objective is to get a profile that suits your eye over any structural advantage then it seems to be a lot of work to a first time builder and could actually risk their first guitar being exceedingly difficult and mildy geometically cattywampus. I have to congradulate you however because for the way I build, top down on a solera, your method solves a set of problems that don't actually exist. Should time and space ever fold in on me and cause anomalies in the laws of physics which create spatial distortions in my guitars, your method will come in handy to rectify those issues.

Ok Scotty, beam me up! Kirk out.

P.S. is it spelled caddywampuss or cattywampus? I never knew.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 4:54:13

stephen hill

 

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Andrew

In my understanding, Reyes builds his guitars in the traditional way using a solera and mold. To relieve the sides at the position of the upper harmonic bar you would have to change the way you build, (ie not the way Reyes and the southern makers do. ) Its all possible but to use a solera and flat rim to the front gives you a fixed neck angle. The neck angle depends on your doming to the front, and the fitting of the fingerboard from the 12th fret to the soundhole is done by relieving the fingerbord underside taking 1mm or so at the 19th to nothing at the 12th.
Reyes doesnt use a particularily high dome hence the neck angle can be as far forward as 2.5mm at the nut giving a more or less flat plane at the neck to body Joint. Anyhow, great plan Tom! I have one as you know.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 5:16:32
 
estebanana

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to stephen hill

quote:

and the fitting of the fingerboard from the 12th fret to the soundhole is done by relieving the fingerbord underside taking 1mm or so at the 19th to nothing at the 12th.
Reyes doesnt use a particularily high dome hence the neck angle can be as far forward as 2.5mm at the nut giving a more or less flat plane at the neck to body Joint


Ha ha. Excellent direct post.

Which means if Reyes pushed his neck far foward the bottom of the fingerboard would only need a subtle taper to fit the angle at the body/neck join. Sighting from the nut to bridge would give the appearance of a flat fingerboard. Looking from the side at the body neck join you can see the taper from the 19th fret to the 12th.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 5:33:25

stephen hill

 

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From: La Herradura, Granada, Spain

RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to estebanana

in fact, 2.5mm is quite a forward angle giving a pretty low string height at the bridge.
When a maker starts, the neck angle is one of the hardest things to sort. You can make a plan but in reality things change when you make and string, so, start with a basic system and then work by trial until its right. I use 1.5mm forward angle and a doming of 3mm in the center of the top and a 6mm fingerboard. This is about right for me.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 5:40:17
 
Tom Blackshear

 

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to stephen hill

quote:

ORIGINAL: stephen hill

In my understanding, Reyes builds his guitars in the traditional way using a solera and mold. To relieve the sides at the position of the upper harmonic bar you would have to change the way you build, (ie not the way Reyes and the southern makers do. ) Its all possible but to use a solera and flat rim to the front gives you a fixed neck angle. The neck angle depends on your doming to the front, and the fitting of the fingerboard from the 12th fret to the soundhole is done by relieving the fingerbord underside taking 1mm or so at the 19th to nothing at the 12th.
Reyes doesnt use a particularily high dome hence the neck angle can be as far forward as 2.5mm at the nut giving a more or less flat plane at the neck to body Joint. Anyhow, great plan Tom! I have one as you know.


Hi Stephen, good to see your post here. I understand that Reyes uses a solera and the actual 2003 guitar I drew the plan of was lifted about 2.5 mm at the nut. I thought it was a little much but I followed that trend just the same.

But I build the straight fret board like Reyes, in that it is totally even thickness from the nut to the 19th fret; no taper from the 12th to 19th, but totally even.

To do this I slightly relieve the side edges to compensate not having to concave the bars going across the top. Normally this incorporates lowering the upper bout on its edges, slightly, and tapering up to keep the waist in its original height.

If you put a straight edge from the nut to the bottom of the sound hole, the tip of the straight edge will hit the edge of the sound hole about half way down into the top thickness at the lower end of the hole. And as I've already said, I don't dome the top under the bridge but behind it, more than halfway toward to the bottom of the guitar. And the normal string height at the bridge is about 8 mm.

This technique, with the built up solid lining, similar to the Miguel Rodriguez classical guitars, lifts the top and rounds it a little at the bottom because of the lininer lift at the bottom, with the wood filler, then the middle fan braces are slightly bent to raise it a bit more but it maintains a flat suface in front of the bridge. I get a lot of power and sound this way; so much so, that it gives me the opportunity to flavor the voicing, as the guitar's volume is being tuned down a bit; this is before it goes out the door.

I'm doing this now, on the Miguel Rodriguez (Style) classical models I build.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 6:37:00

stephen hill

 

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From: La Herradura, Granada, Spain

RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Tom Blackshear

Hi Tom, I see your point and its of course interesting to come to the same place using different ways. I also notes on all the Reyes guitars I have had through the shop that the fingerboard was more equal in thickness than on other guitars say from Granada. Its interesting to see how each area Madrid, Cordoba, Granada develops their style but in the case of 2 makers like Reyes and Rodriguez next door to each other they work in a different way.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 6:45:35
 
estebanana

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Andrew

Tom,

It's interesting, but I believe that the method you use is not typical or that it provides more power than a guitar built to a plane. The way you intially explained it was not clear at all.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 7:38:24
 
Tom Blackshear

 

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to estebanana

quote:

ORIGINAL: estebanana

Tom,

It's interesting, but I believe that the method you use is not typical or that it provides more power than a guitar built to a plane. The way you intially explained it was not clear at all.


I understand what you are saying and this is the reason I teach one to one classes with my style. And no player, that I know of, complains that my guitars are not loud enough :-)

But seriously, if I built the guitar perfectly to the plan, without tweaking the sound it would be too noisy. I think that my adding the Miguel Rodriguez solid two piece laminate lining to the top, also helps volume a little. This helps control how the top is tapered; a pretty simple techique once it is learned.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 8:29:45
 
Peter Tsiorba

Posts: 130
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From: Portland, Oregon Pacific Northwest

RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Tom Blackshear

quote:

ORIGINAL: Tom Blackshear

...But seriously, if I built the guitar perfectly to the plan, without tweaking the sound it would be too noisy...


Hey Tom. I wouldn't mind seeing your guitar in person some day. It's an amazing claim that a guitar can be too "noisy" which I assume means too loud.

By the way, I do have the plan you've drafted for LMI.

As an aside, I had a chance to see in person a very early Reyes guitar, and it seemed quite different from his later stuff. Extremely light blanca. The sound was good but a bit "soft" to my liking.







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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 12:34:39
 
Andy Culpepper

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Andrew

Yesterday I got to play a "Reyes" built by Kenny Hill from Tom's plans. Actually it was Kenny's prototype for that design (the first one he built).
It's a great guitar with deep bass. The low E string open and the F and F# on that string were all very short notes suggesting that the guitar is probably tuned somewhere down there around F.

The stiffness, or what Anders would describe as pulsation on this guitar was very stiff..felt almost like playing a steel string. Anyone else have this result from the Reyes design?

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 14:23:25
 
Tom Blackshear

 

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Andy Culpepper

quote:

ORIGINAL: deteresa1

Yesterday I got to play a "Reyes" built by Kenny Hill from Tom's plans. Actually it was Kenny's prototype for that design (the first one he built).
It's a great guitar with deep bass. The low E string open and the F and F# on that string were all very short notes suggesting that the guitar is probably tuned somewhere down there around F.

The stiffness, or what Anders would describe as pulsation on this guitar was very stiff..felt almost like playing a steel string. Anyone else have this result from the Reyes design?



I talked with Kenny about that, as he tought he could improve on the design before building an exact copy of the plan. I suggested that he build to the plan first to have a basic idea where to go from there. Also, I suggested that he send me a copy that he was satisfied with and have me check it out, but that never materialized.

One thing about the Hill guitars is that he was the only new builder besides myself that the Brune shop sold for quite some time. But as time has a way of changing things, Brune is now selling Francisco Navarro guitars made with the Miguel Rodriguez and Reyes designs. Richard told me that he couldn't have a better deal for the price, anywhere.

He also mentioned that the best quality for any price right now is the Navarro guitar. Should I take credit for that since I shared some fine tuning information with Francisco when he was in San Antonio a few summers ago? :-)

Who knows, but it wasn't until Francisco got through his own ideas with my plans, before he settled down and started building flat tops, like I suggested in the beginning. And that slight alteration back to the original idea worked much better for him.

Perhaps I should add that the design is capable of a long sustain, if built right.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 15:13:16
 
Tom Blackshear

 

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Tom Blackshear

oops

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 15:17:10
 
JasonMcGuire

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Tom Blackshear

Sure Tom... go ahead and take credit for Navarro's great sounding guitars. I am sure it has everything to do with you.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 15:17:16
 
Tom Blackshear

 

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to JasonMcGuire

quote:

ORIGINAL: JasonMcGuire

Sure Tom... go ahead and take credit for Navarro's great sounding guitars. I am sure it has everything to do with you.


How ya doing Jason, staying out of trouble, I hope. But like the old proverb says:

"There is gold and an abundance of rubies, but the lips of knowledge are a precious jewel."

This is what I've tried to share openly with anyone who has an inquiring mind.

You do it with your teaching, Glenn does it, and I try and do my thing, Amigo.

And yes, I can take credit where credit is due. Poncho refers to me as tio Tom as a show of respect but I'm not sure what your ideas are; perhaps just making conversation? :-)

Call me and we'll talk about whatever is bothering you.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 15:39:05
 
nhills

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From: West Des Moines, IA USA

RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Tom Blackshear

quote:

Perhaps I should add that the design is capable of a long sustain, if built right


I've usually heard that long sustain was not desirable in a flamenco. Am I confused?
Cheers,
Norman

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 16:30:08
 
JasonMcGuire

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Tom Blackshear

I remember playing a fantastic sounding Navarro back in 1994. Miguel Rodriguez had one and was showing it to me. I told Roberto Castellon about him and he ended up getting a couple and I believe he still has them.

I have never met Francisco, but I have recommended his guitars many times as they are a great value and as you said probably the best out there at that particular price point.

Nothing bugging me really... just drawing some attention to your generosity.

I was hanging out all morning here, having some fun and taking the day off from all seriousness.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 16:36:53
 
Tom Blackshear

 

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to nhills

quote:

ORIGINAL: nhills

quote:

Perhaps I should add that the design is capable of a long sustain, if built right


I've usually heard that long sustain was not desirable in a flamenco. Am I confused?
Cheers,
Norman


Why don't you give this question directly to Jason. Perhaps he has a good idea?

My answer would be, Reyes built his that way.

Since Jason is an accomplished flamenco guitarist, he might give you an answer or preference, according to his playing style.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 16:41:52
 
JasonMcGuire

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Tom Blackshear

Typically a long sustain isn't the norm for flamenco guitars, especially in the traditional sense. This can be somewhat confusing though as a guitar with that traditional dry, fast attack and rapid initial decay and raspiness with lots of nice warm "growliness" in the basses are still more than capable of creating a sweetness by means of its overtones that are created by the sympathetic resonances shared by certain notes and elements of the guitar controlled by the maker. One may think that these are mere accidents, but most luthiers are listening for certain resonances all through the construction process and over the course of as many years as Tom has been building, they usually have a very keen sense of what sounds those elements can produce. A guitar with simply a long sustain in and of itself is nearly impossible to pull the dry, fast attack type of sounds from, but a well built flamenca can produce both a beautiful sustained voice as well as that typical dry flamenco sound.

Its very much the same as how a guitarist who has played for many years has a certain control over what sounds he is able to pull from an instrument and can seemingly do so on even the cheapest of guitars. Hence the saying... "Its the witch, not the wand."

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 16:54:46
 
estebanana

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Andrew

Actually I'd like to talk about the older Reyes guitars. I have one locally that I can access for a few day sat a time. It's a real nice one the late 60's.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 17:28:40
 
JasonMcGuire

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RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to estebanana

oh no..... not again

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 23 2010 17:47:43
 
Tom Blackshear

 

Posts: 2303
Joined: Apr. 15 2008
 

RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to estebanana

quote:

ORIGINAL: estebanana

Actually I'd like to talk about the older Reyes guitars. I have one locally that I can access for a few day sat a time. It's a real nice one the late 60's.


I have checked out Reyes models since 1976 and I find that no two seem to be exactly alike, perhaps due to Don Manuel's prolific style of research and development.

However, I have NOT been privileged to see all of his models, so your ideas to have dialog about the Reyes guitars would always be interesting to me.

This is certainly not a competitive factor between old and new makers but to maintain a historical link to things that seem to repeat themselves to some degree. Even some new builders are talking about resurrecting the Tornovoz.

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Tom Blackshear Guitar maker
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 28 2010 11:20:50
 
Tom Blackshear

 

Posts: 2303
Joined: Apr. 15 2008
 

RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to JasonMcGuire

quote:

ORIGINAL: JasonMcGuire

Typically a long sustain isn't the norm for flamenco guitars, especially in the traditional sense. This can be somewhat confusing though as a guitar with that traditional dry, fast attack and rapid initial decay and raspiness with lots of nice warm "growliness" in the basses are still more than capable of creating a sweetness by means of its overtones that are created by the sympathetic resonances shared by certain notes and elements of the guitar controlled by the maker. One may think that these are mere accidents, but most luthiers are listening for certain resonances all through the construction process and over the course of as many years as Tom has been building, they usually have a very keen sense of what sounds those elements can produce. A guitar with simply a long sustain in and of itself is nearly impossible to pull the dry, fast attack type of sounds from, but a well built flamenca can produce both a beautiful sustained voice as well as that typical dry flamenco sound.

Its very much the same as how a guitarist who has played for many years has a certain control over what sounds he is able to pull from an instrument and can seemingly do so on even the cheapest of guitars. Hence the saying... "Its the witch, not the wand."


Yes, there is a way to build flamenco guitars with sustain but as a underlying frequency that accentuates the notes being played, not with a lot of surface noise, but as a quick attack; immediate sound with a mournful inner support of lower frequencies in the actual sustain. To achieve this takes a lot of middle register relief without sacrificing the guitar's sharp outer edge; basically maintaining a more open inner voice with different colors and keeping its tight edge.

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Tom Blackshear Guitar maker
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 28 2010 11:39:04
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: GAL Reyes plan (in reply to Tom Blackshear

quote:

I have checked out Reyes models since 1976 and I find that no two seem to be exactly alike, perhaps due to Don Manuel's prolific style of research and development.


I think he just gets bored building it the same way every time. I'll see if I can borrow the 1969 Reyes for a few days and take sum pitchers ob it.

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https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 28 2010 17:30:14
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