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Learning basic Bulerias in a Peña in Huelva   You are logged in as Guest
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Anders Eliasson

Posts: 5780
Joined: Oct. 18 2006
 

Learning basic Bulerias in a Peña i... 

Hi guys.

After having read the thread about choice of first bulerias, I thought that this might interest some.

I knew some about playing bulerias when I moved to Huelva, I had a good compas and counted in 2, BUT I wish I had learned bulerias the way Antonio Dovao teaches it to Bulerias beginners. I would have learned twice in half the time and what I can play now I would have played a lot better

At first its ALL about compas and soniquete. (sorry, dont know how to translate soniquete, but it has something to do with a repeated monotounous playing or lets say, the characteristic way you play a bulerias in a certain area, the repeated strumming scheme)
Hardly any counting in the head, but yes tapping the feet 12 - 2 - 4 - 6 - 8 - 10 while learning the fingering and strumming of a basic Jerez soniquete. This slowly and easy untill you can get up at 6 in the morning and before your first cup of cofee play it at 200 - 220.....tapping your feet at the same time .
After this comes part two, learning some basic chord progressions for accompanying cante. When you have learned that, you play in group with your teacher and a cantaor.

After this, and it takes a month or two, you learn a SIMPLE thumb falseta, like Diego del Gastor or Manuel Morao. And thats it. You are now on your own.

The fact is that some almost beginners with 150,-€ guitars and a lousy tecnique are capable of playing something which has all the important parts of a bulerias and they can sit along and learn more.

When I read a thread like Bogdans, there are 2 things I dont like.

1) playing Paco or Paco or Moraito or whoever... Wrong... play simple things. I started with Paco and a lousy teacher and it took me forever. I know its difficult when you dont have the acces to what I just described, but there are ways. If you have a teacher, say you want to learn that way, use recordings to get the soniquete (I recommend M Morao y Cepero) and recordings to play with cante. If your teacher cant do that..... Find another or learn Malgueñas with him/her
If you havent got acces to a teacher, use a slowdowner and do it on your own. When you can master this, you start working on falsetas. IMHO its totally wrong to work with scores before this stage.

2) as always it gets to tecnical, to brainy, to many looooooong explications on how this and that famous player do this and that. Bulerias you dont play with your brain but with your Cojones

Saludos
I´m not joining the Peña at the moment because of time issues, but I miss it. The level is low, but you learn a lot.

Saludos
Anders

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 15 2008 20:15:22
 
Bogdan1980

 

Posts: 370
Joined: May 23 2007
From: Frederick, MD

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

ANders

I completely agree with you on starting it right. Again, that's why I started the previous thread. Paco's bulerias, or Tomatito are not good starting points.
And that's why I asked for some advice, and besides some good things from Ricardo and guitarbudda I got: play Moraito or El Tempul.!?

What is this basic strum that you're talking about that's what I'm after?

And question two: What you're talking about in your post, is it some kind of class one can enroll in? I was thinking about making a trip to Spain at some point nd participating in one of these classes. Is there more info on this somehwere?

Thanks
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 2:01:43
 
sig

 

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Joined: Nov. 7 2007
From: Wisconsin

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Bogdan1980

Bogdan,
Let me see if I can help with counting Bulerias; here's how I was taught First off, I have been very lucky to have a Flamenco teacher who is patient and understanding especially since starting with Bulerias. I have been taking lessons since 2003 and just last year we started learning Bulerias!! I feel it is a difficult compas to master especially as a beginner such as myself partly because of the speed at which it is performed. I have been taught to count as follows: as you know it starts on 12 so it would be: TWELVE, and one and two and THREE and four and five and SIX and seven and EIGHT and nine and TEN and golpe for eleven and back to TWELVE. Of course the capitalized beats are accented; I strum down on the accented beat and upstrum on the "and". I also worked on the basic compas for a while using just one chord which was boring but helped with the count. I did not move into any Falsetta's until I had a good handle on compas. I was able to try out my Bulerias while accompanying a dance class a month ago and that really, really helped. I can't say it went real smooth but it cemented the compas in my mind. I am no expert but this method has really helped me. Hope this helps!
Sig--
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 5:36:05
 
Anders Eliasson

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

sig, Thats basically what I wouldn´t recommend. All this counting and 12 etc.... Nope, it complicates life and makes it all to brainy.

Bogdan, If you come to Spain and want some lessons, the best to do is to get a private teacher while you are here. It doesnt have to be some big name guy and I will strongly recommend Antonio from the Peña in Huelva. He´s very good at teaching basic stuff, the things which are the most difficult to learn when you are on your own......
While you are here, you can come and go in the peña as you like. The classes I talk about are only twice a week and they are all year long. Besides, this with the singer, I dont think they do any more.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 6:05:02
 
Bogdan1980

 

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From: Frederick, MD

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

Hey Sig

Thanks, that looks pretty clear, I'm gonna try that tonight. Thanks for describing it in such detail. I don't think there is a place to accompany dance here where I live, but I'm still far away from that point. First, I'll try to get the pattern

Bogdan
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 6:07:28
 
Bogdan1980

 

Posts: 370
Joined: May 23 2007
From: Frederick, MD

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

Anders

What was that basic strum you were talking about?
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 6:08:39
 
guitarbuddha

 

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

I'm with you Anders. If someone cant play one compas over and over and over again rock solid then there is no point learning even one falseta.

Difficult thing with beginners is that they claim that doing this it is boring. And they make it true by playing badly. IMO it is only boring playing repetetive stuff if your head is in the wrong place. One compas played really well repeated 2000 times with real vitality and dynamics beats the hell out of another kid murdering Almoraima as fast as possible. Not just for the officianado but also for the causual (but musical) listener and for the player.

D.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 6:16:02
 
Stu

Posts: 2091
Joined: Jan. 30 2007
From: London (the South of it), England

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to guitarbuddha

quote:

At first its ALL about compas and soniquete. (sorry, dont know how to translate soniquete, but it has something to do with a repeated monotounous playing or lets say, the characteristic way you play a bulerias in a certain area, the repeated strumming scheme)
Hardly any counting in the head, but yes tapping the feet 12 - 2 - 4 - 6 - 8 - 10 while learning the fingering and strumming of a basic Jerez soniquete. This slowly and easy untill you can get up at 6 in the morning and before your first cup of cofee play it at 200 - 220.....tapping your feet at the same time .
After this comes part two, learning some basic chord progressions for accompanying cante. When you have learned that, you play in group with your teacher and a cantaor.


So Anders can you explain further??
What are you saying that's different to other methods??
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 6:26:27
 
Anders Eliasson

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

quote:

What was that basic strum you were talking about?


Listen to Cante records with Manuel Morao or Paco Cepero as guitarrists. I talk about the way they play the A - Bb chords. The right hand strumming and the little things in the left hand. They are quit religious with these things in Jerez.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 7:02:39
 
Anders Eliasson

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

quote:

So Anders can you explain further??
What are you saying that's different to other methods??


What do you want me to explain further. Do you want another brainy thread about bulerias compás.

The difference about other methods is that you DONT start with the 12 3 6 8 10 counting... It doesnt start with counting but with soniquete and foot tapping getting groovy is what its about. Getting mental is what its NOT about.
You dont start with falsetas. Falsetas are not important and when you learn the first one, go for one you can play at 220 being nervous because everyone is looking at you.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 7:06:43
 
Pgh_flamenco

 

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From: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

Anders, I like this approach--tapping the feet on 12 - 2 - 4 - 6 - 8 - 10--because it seems to me that this is the same type of backbeat found in many other forms of modern music. I guess they want the music to swing and this makes it easier. Am I correct in assuming this, because if so it would certainly simplify learning and playing buleria compas?
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 8:14:56
 
Ricardo

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From: Washington DC

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Pgh_flamenco

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pgh_flamenco

Anders, I like this approach--tapping the feet on 12 - 2 - 4 - 6 - 8 - 10--because it seems to me that this is the same type of backbeat found in many other forms of modern music. I guess they want the music to swing and this makes it easier. Am I correct in assuming this, because if so it would certainly simplify learning and playing buleria compas?


There are many views on this, but IMO tapping that way is simply marking the beat, NOT the back beat. Yeah, I am saying the counting is backwards. The back beat or "up beat" I prefer to say, you hear with the palmas. Same for Tangos, just different numbers involved.

Ricardo
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 8:56:41
 
Ricardo

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Bogdan1980

quote:

ORIGINAL: Bogdan1980

Anders

What was that basic strum you were talking about?


All anders said I agree totally. I have been saying many years don't count until later for dance class, learn rhythm patterns first, and simple falsetas. No pieces, no counting, no fancy metronome. Just keep a beat.

The only thing I need to say is about being scared of Paco transcriptions. Look, in El Tempul, between almost every falseta, or fancy rasgueado, you have very fundamental BASIC bulerias compas strumming patterns, that everyone should know. I mean, the student needs to understand how to EXTRACT those little things from a score, and get them solid. It is not a part of the composition, the composition is just the falsetas, and each one is glued together by BASIC compas strumming patterns. At least with that piece. So no need to warn every beginner that Paco has NOTHING to offer them. It is not true.

Also the thing about El tempul being uploaded here by some of us, understand it is not like we condone learning entire pieces as the way to learn flamenco. It was just supposed to be a fun thing to share and 'compete" with each other in a friendly way. It was already suggested numerous times that there are SOME falsetas there for a beginner to handle, and just ONE falseta upload was acceptable. We did not really meantion how important the compas strumming was in El Tempul and for sure Henrik and I have our own personal things we do inbetween, but for students, I mean that is the fundamental stuff right there. Don't be scared of it it needs to be learned early on.

Ricardo
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 9:03:30
 
Bogdan1980

 

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From: Frederick, MD

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

Perhaps this were I get confused. Like I said every buleria I hear I can hear a steady beat. And I can easily hold within that beat and strum the A, Bb, etc. But that seems to simple. And then I worry about the twelve count and that throws me off.

Is it really that simple? Just strum within the basic beat you hear?
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 9:13:36
 
XXX

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Ricardo

quote:

ORIGINAL: Ricardo

It was already suggested numerous times that there are SOME falsetas there for a beginner to handle, and just ONE falseta upload was acceptable.


Can you specify which falseta. I really mean it, i was listening to the piece and thought "everything is hard to play". So im really curious which falseta you find for a beginner to handle, coz i have been looking desperatly for "not-impossible" bulerias falsetas a long time.

edit: you mean the one at 2:20 ? a nice one. I love how he closes at 2:29 and then even makes pull off on g string on the A phryg chord... at that speed.

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Фламенко
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 9:19:22
 
cathulu

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From: Vancouver, Canukistan

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Ricardo

I think everyone learns differently. For me, I need to count, at least to learn the falseta and to practice it at slow speeds. At the speeds I learn it, to not count would be impractical as there is no rhythmic feel to go by. Not much happens at 60bpm or less!

Which is frustrating because some falsetas you cannot easily count you have to feel. That makes me uncomfortable but I am slowly getting over that. Which I guess means I am slowly getting to the place where you would say I should have been starting at.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 11:17:29
 
Pgh_flamenco

 

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From: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Ricardo

quote:

Yeah, I am saying the counting is backwards. The back beat or "up beat" I prefer to say, you hear with the palmas.


Is this done to add to the syncopated feel of the rhythm?
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 12:09:37
 
Anders Eliasson

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Bogdan1980

quote:

Is it really that simple? Just strum within the basic beat you hear?


Yes... If you can play a correct strumming like the ones I told you or the ones that fx Paco plays inbetween falsetas like Ricardo says, yes, its that simple, another thing is that you can use other chords tha A - Bb. There are many standard progression and also remates.
When you can play the soniquete well, and some standard chord progressions, play with cante. In general standard Jerez. Parilla, M. Morao and Cepero
Camaron and Paco is also good stuff because the music is great and also because the mix favours the guitar a lot, whereas on many other cd´s the guitar can be difficult to hear.

When they play falsetas, concentrate on accompanying those falsetas.

In general, listen........ and listen more to cante.

Oh, I wish I had time to do this myself. Maybe thats why I posted this thread, because I´m frustrated because of lack of time. Reforming a house is time consuming and stiff mortar hands are not very precise.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 18:08:35
 
Anders Eliasson

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

Another thing

When my teacher Antonio Dovao teaches, he taps 12 2 4 6 8 10 as I already mentioned.
BUT he taps the 12 and the 6 with his right foot and the rest with his left. This gives you this very important half compas feel or as they say here that a bulerias compas is basically 1 2 3.......
Ooooohhh, I know... Now its so simple that a lot of people will say. No... this cant be true. Bulerias have to be difficult because I have been told so 1000 times and here comes this dum dane and tells me its just 1 2 3.... Far out .

Choose yourself. Be mental and complicate your life or play with your body and everything is a lot easyer.

Of course there are more things to bulerias.. But when you can control this, everything else is a lot simpler and somehow just variations over a theme. You tap 12 2 4 6 8 10 while you accentuate 12 3 10 for a basic bulerias feel. This you might call sincopation and at first it can be difficult but when you have it in body and soul and not in brain, its a wonderfull beat.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 18:19:35
 
NormanKliman

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Bogdan1980)1 votes

quote:

Is it really that simple? Just strum within the basic beat you hear?


Yeah, just keep things in threes (two groups of three): 12 and 2 and 4, 6 and 8 and 10. That's the rhythmic context that you want to feel. Lots of falsetas start on 1, end on 10, end on 6, start on 9.5, etc., and in each of those situations, there's a different relationship between the beginning/end of the falseta and the rhythmic context. That sounds a lot more complicated than it really is. For example, falsetas that start on 1 come in after the very first foot tap (beat 12), falsetas that end on 10 are going to be followed by the first foot tap, falsetas ending on 6 are going to be followed by 2 foot taps, etc.

After you've got a good strong sense of compás, work out a few ways to go from A to B flat in the first three foot taps (notice how the B flat falls between the second and third foot tap), then work out a number of ways to resolve (end up in A again) in the last three foot taps. Mix and match those beginnings and endings, and you'll be on the road to glory!

Another thing that you'll want to work out are the rasgueados heard in the last three foot taps, almost always on an A or A7 chord. For years, the only one I did in bulerías was q-m-p, q-m-p, q-m-p, q over 7-8-9-10, because it's always been easy for me and I couldn't figure out the others. I'd always played (e)-a-m-i rasgueados in soleá, siguiriya and other styles, but not in bulerías. So one day, thanks to the explanation of a good friend and some other things that I'd seen, everything clicked into place. I'll try to describe this below.

Before we start, remember that tapping your foot on the even-numbered beats means that there's one foot tap for every two beats, so when you're figuring these things out, start slow and tap your foot on every beat. When you've got the rasgueado pattern working, go back and commit it to memory at normal speed and with one foot tap for every two beats. These kinds of patterns (over beats 7-10) start between the fourth and fifth foot tap: 12-2-4-6-(start rasgueado here)-8-10.

Play (e)-a-m-i-i three times on an A chord, with or without the little finger (e), over beats 7-10, one "cycle" per beat. If you play equal cycles of a-m-i-i, that'd be sixteenth notes (four strokes per beat), and e-a-m-i-i would be quintuplets (five strokes per beat), and you can hit beat 10 with another index downstroke.

a-m-i-i, a-m-i-i, a-m-i-i, i

There's a variation on this idea that sounds a lot more flamenco but is a lot less obvious, and it's what had me puzzled for so many years. For example, if you play a-m-i-i in triplets (a-m-i, i-a-m, i-i-a), you're left with a middle-finger downstroke for beat 10, which is awkward. The way to make it work is to play some cycles in triplets and others in sixteenths in order to get another finger to fall on beat 10. There are a few ways to do this, because you can play the faster cycle(s) on any of the three beats--whatever works for you--but it sounds a little better to "crowd" the ending rather than the beginning. For example:

a-m-i, i-a-m, i-i-a-m, i.

If you prefer to hit beat 10 with an index upstroke, play two of the cycles faster:

a-m-i, i-a-m-i, i-a-m-i, i.

The same idea applies to e-a-m-i-i (with the little finger), but you'd be playing combinations of sixteenths and quintuplets instead of triplets and sixteenths.

There are all kinds of crazy combinations, and you don't have to use the same fingering, either. For example:

i-a-m, i-i-a-m, i-i-a-m-i, i.

Just look at that: a triplet, sixteenths AND a quintuplet. Cool, huh?

There are many other possibilities, like the q-a-i rasgueado, or playing three complete cycles of e-a-m-i-i starting on beat 6, like Diego del Gastor. The best thing to do is to find something that works for you (=easy), analyze it if you can (and don't worry about it if you can't), and then look for other ways to get the job done.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 16 2008 20:12:51
 
guitarbuddha

 

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Anders Eliasson



Choose yourself. Be mental and complicate your life or play with your body and everything is a lot easyer.



but when you have it in body and soul and not in brain, its a wonderfull beat.



Two gems Anders. The first a classic false dichotomy, here is another one which of these doesn't add up to four, one plus three or two plus two.

The second I need you to clarify, if you have it body and soul but ALSO brain, is it not a wonderful beat ?

D.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 17 2008 2:42:03
 
Bogdan1980

 

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From: Frederick, MD

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

Awesome, if that's all there is to it, I'm on top. I don't have a problem keeping the 1,2,3 beat.

Thanks Anders and thanks Norman for details. I'll practice those now.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 17 2008 3:57:18
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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 17 2008 12:58:12
 
eccullen

 

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

These posts on bulerias basics are really wonderful: Anders, Ricardo, everyone, thank you very much !
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 17 2008 17:27:12
 
Ailsa

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Guest

Good find on Flamenco-world nealf - and I'll add the CD to my ever growing list!
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 17 2008 20:13:47
 
Ailsa

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to NormanKliman

Brilliant Norman thanks, tho it's led to me starting another thread......
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 17 2008 20:18:00
 
Anders Eliasson

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RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

Hi again

I just posted a video in the uploads section, showing what I learned in the Peña.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 19 2008 22:59:54
 
Ricardo

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From: Washington DC

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to cathulu

quote:

ORIGINAL: cathulu

I think everyone learns differently. For me, I need to count, at least to learn the falseta and to practice it at slow speeds. At the speeds I learn it, to not count would be impractical as there is no rhythmic feel to go by. Not much happens at 60bpm or less!

Which is frustrating because some falsetas you cannot easily count you have to feel. That makes me uncomfortable but I am slowly getting over that. Which I guess means I am slowly getting to the place where you would say I should have been starting at.


I want to second all Anders said in posts earlier once again, especially about it being easy "1,2,3". Like I have been writting for years on the foro. Funny how something so simple can become a debate (if you see the archives).

And to the quote above, I suggest not worrying about the count to 12, even going VERY slow. Rather, if it is a falseta or strumming, or simply feeling empty space, just go one beat to the next without missing/adding anything in between. Feel each on or off beat or space or whatever, don't think about the 12 business or where you think accents need to be. Just play the notes one beat to the next, and feel that time from one beat to the next, and don't add notes until you feel just that little bit. As it adds up, the music literally dictates the compas for you, assuming you are not adding or subtracting anything.

I prefer to practice at a medium speed, but not "in compas" rather just one beat to the next and loop it. Then I add the music for the next beat. Then the next, and so on, just keeping a simple steady beat. If you tap your foot 12,2,4 etc as Anders describes, you dont'even need to think that hard about it. Just tap your foot. Between the taps you have 12&1&, 2&3&, 4&5&, etc. Simply, 4 sounds per beat. So you fill those spaces with your notes or strumming, or when you have no sounds, you FEEL those spaces. But you don't even need to figure out where you are, just keep an even steady groove, and once you have all the music added up, you will see it feels just fine and in compas. No need to even check unless you MUST, you can put on a palmas loop or compas cd or whatever. Eventually you will trust yourself that it just feels right, and can do pretty much ALL your practice and learning with the foot going at a steady speed.

For the record, the only time I think about WHERE I am in compas is getting in or out of a falseta from just rhythm. The starting point of a falseta is relative to your compas struming pattern. Perhaps you start after a golpe, or rasgueado, or an up stroke contra, etc. But once you know the proper feeling of the starting point relative your basic compas strumming, then you just keep your groove going, it is really that simple.

Ricardo
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 20 2008 2:38:38
 
sig

 

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From: Wisconsin

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

Anders,
I basically agree with you in regards to the counting and what i've found is once the compas is internalized I don't have to count at all. It's a strange conundrum, inorder to properly play Bulerias for example, you need to understand the basic meter yet, inorder to play it well especially while accompanying you have to as you said not get all brainy and learn to "feel" it and not count!!
Sig--
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 20 2008 3:22:16
 
gato

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Joined: Jun. 9 2007
 

RE: Learning basic Bulerias in a Pe... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

Thanx for the thread! I like the idea that it's better to feel the compas, because when you analyze sesomething you have to stop analyzing and play and feel at some point or it stands in the way of the more direct aproach of feeling the music. Though analysis can make it quite clear, music should be from the spirit and not so mechanical, not driven by the anxiety to get it right. Compas lives in the moment of performance and not on paper while analysis is a tool of mental faculty and should be regarded as a tool, not as the performance itself. I think that's it! I certainly enjoyed all of the ideas and expertise from all of you. Oh well.......I'm not lurking!

Gary
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Feb. 20 2008 5:47:25
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