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Un poco de Fandangos   You are logged in as Guest
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Morante

 

Posts: 2211
Joined: Nov. 21 2010
 

Un poco de Fandangos 

Two of the great artists from Huelva.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 6 2024 16:39:15
 
Stu

Posts: 2618
Joined: Jan. 30 2007
From: London (the South of it), England

RE: Un poco de Fandangos (in reply to Morante

Wow! His first Aieeee, nearly knocked me off the toilet seat!
That was great. Thanks for sharing. What a voice he has!!

I notice the guitarist plays his solo bits fast and then shows down for the chorus chords and into the letra. Is that normal?
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 7 2024 10:23:02
 
Mark2

Posts: 1891
Joined: Jul. 12 2004
From: San Francisco

RE: Un poco de Fandangos (in reply to Stu

It happens here too:


I learned this guitar part to study accompaniment. I recorded it and Tino told me he thought it was unusual because in his opinion, the vocal felt more like fandango naturales as opposed to fandangos de Huelva. IOW, the compas is fandangos de Huelva but he felt the singing did not have the aire of it.

He also said if you want to really learn fandangos de Huelva listen to people from Huelva. I asked about Paco Toronjo and of course he said he was incredible but being from Alosno, he imbodied that style. He then showed me the difference in the playing styles. With fandangos de Alosno the way you play compas is a little different. Having said that in the example Morente posted the guitar sounds more like Huelva to me, but I'm not sure. Would love for more knowledgeable folks to weigh in.

Here is José Maria de Lepe, sobrino of Paco Toronjo, doing fandangos de Alosno. He's from Huelva :-)

https://www.bing.com/videos/riverview/relatedvideo?q=Jos%c3%a9+Maria+de+Lepe&mid=88A45BF645839F559DB488A45BF645839F559DB4&FORM=VIRE

You can hear the difference in the guitar playing compas. BTW Tino said there are more than fifty styles of fandangos......fun.

quote:

ORIGINAL: Stu

Wow! His first Aieeee, nearly knocked me off the toilet seat!
That was great. Thanks for sharing. What a voice he has!!

I notice the guitarist plays his solo bits fast and then shows down for the chorus chords and into the letra. Is that normal?
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 7 2024 17:51:21
 
Ricardo

Posts: 14984
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: Un poco de Fandangos (in reply to Mark2

quote:

He also said if you want to really learn fandangos de Huelva listen to people from Huelva. I asked about Paco Toronjo and of course he said he was incredible but being from Alosno, he imbodied that style. He then showed me the difference in the playing styles. With fandangos de Alosno the way you play compas is a little different. Having said that in the example Morente posted the guitar sounds more like Huelva to me, but I'm not sure. Would love for more knowledgeable folks to weigh in.


Rancampino there is singing Paco Toronjo style and even the same letra he sings in the Flamenco movie. I would not get too hung up on regional “styles” of guitar accompaniment. You put swing into the rhythm or not, but the form is what it is. The important thing is to understand, if you decide to maintain compas or tempo rather than do the free style versions, you have to keep the formal structure intact. For example he was keeping the melody more or less in the box (much slower than the initial falsetas) however, he elongated the final line of verse which means you are having to add music underneath (they basically take 2 full compases to resolve one line), and the player needs to know that is not always done that way. I played for a singer from Huelva once, and he insisted on elongated like the 4th sung line or something odd. The thing about Alosno (pronounced Ah-lor-no) is they will sing in chorus sometimes as demonstrated in the Flamenco movie.

_____________________________

CD's and transcriptions available here:
www.ricardomarlow.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2024 11:44:41
 
Morante

 

Posts: 2211
Joined: Nov. 21 2010
 

RE: Un poco de Fandangos (in reply to Ricardo

quote:

I would not get too hung up on regional “styles” of guitar accompaniment.


Don`t forget that there are several styles which do not follow the common chord sequence: de Santa Eulalia for example.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2024 16:40:19
 
Mark2

Posts: 1891
Joined: Jul. 12 2004
From: San Francisco

RE: Un poco de Fandangos (in reply to Ricardo

Thanks for your post. I did catch the enlogated line. You just have to wait until the singer resolves. This is the real challenge in accompaniment, in baile too. Like I wrote in another post, in working on a tango with La Paquera, she draws out the temple, and some of the letras, for a long time and it can require a few chord changes. I'm sure it's why you see guitarists paying rapt attention to the singer. It's a high wire act for the guitarist. I'll bet for guys who grew up in it, it's natural. For folks who spent their formative years playing rock, r&B, etc, with set changes, it's new. I might never be able to catch this stuff on the fly, but it's fun to study.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2024 16:41:58
 
Ricardo

Posts: 14984
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: Un poco de Fandangos (in reply to Morante

quote:

ORIGINAL: Morante

quote:

I would not get too hung up on regional “styles” of guitar accompaniment.


Don`t forget that there are several styles which do not follow the common chord sequence: de Santa Eulalia for example.


Of course. In fact that is my point, that a melody like that one changes the formal structure, no matter what region the people are from that are interpreting that style. (And good god I have heard a hack guitarist playing the C major copla under that melody, probably thinking the singer out of tune! AHHHHH!!!). I was already familiar with this, and the personal style of Sevillano (a bit different but based on it IMO), before I knew “specific names” for the styles (having learned “on the job”).

My issue is the thing with “regional soniquete” and such, which is nothing more than some important individual artist’s personal style that others pick up on. I have a funny story about the “soniquete de Triana” por bulerías, that over some years I finally got to the bottom of.

_____________________________

CD's and transcriptions available here:
www.ricardomarlow.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 9 2024 13:37:19
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