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RE: Advice sought for martillo technique   You are logged in as Guest
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Ricardo

Posts: 13515
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: Advice sought for martillo technique (in reply to Richard Jernigan

quote:

I learned the word in a different context, definition 2. here

https://dle.rae.es/capirote?m=form



Later I heard the word applied to the flamenco technique.




South Park: “Wow, chef sure is scared of ghosts!!!”

I still get triggered by the images in Sevilla. Apparently a Klan leader adopted the Capirote to scare people. It is scary, I hate to say. It is one of those aspects of the culture that despite its close relationship to the art form I embrace, I have to mentally push it over to the side some where. It is a medieval creepy thing to do (remember/dress up as, the Penitents of the old days). Recently read a book about the gypsies in Spain by Jan Yoors, and his description of the Semana Santa processional was scary to himself as well. It reads like he was transported to medieval times and soon were to be the executions, etc.

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_____________________________

CD's and transcriptions available here:
www.ricardomarlow.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Aug. 4 2022 16:42:53
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3359
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Advice sought for martillo technique (in reply to Ricardo

quote:

I still get triggered by the images in Sevilla. Apparently a Klan leader adopted the Capirote to scare people. It is scary, I hate to say. It is one of those aspects of the culture that despite its close relationship to the art form I embrace, I have to mentally push it over to the side some where. It is a medieval creepy thing to do (remember/dress up as, the Penitents of the old days). Recently read a book about the gypsies in Spain by Jan Yoors, and his description of the Semana Santa processional was scary to himself as well. It reads like he was transported to medieval times and soon were to be the executions, etc.


Semana Santa in the Philippines brings out the more fanatical Catholic Penitentes who are hooded and practice self-flagellation. My wife and I observed the Penitentes' processions when we were assigned to the American Embassy in Manila. It is a strange sight, with the hooded Penitentes whipping themselves in unison with split bamboo on their bare, blood-streaked backs as they walk by. And every year in San Fernando de Pampanga on Good Friday some Filipino is literally nailed to a cross which is then raised up for a short period of time. It is one of the Easter traditions that is a holdover from three hundred years of Spanish rule. But like many things, the Filipinos take it to the extreme.

It reminded me of my time in the US Air Force when I was assigned to our Air Force station at Peshawar, Pakistan. Every year the Shia Muslims would commemorate Ashura, the ninth day of the month of Muharram, by forming processions and flagellating themselves to commemorate the martyrdom of Hussein, the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad, at the Battle of Karbala. The Pakistani Shiites did not wear hoods, but their self-flagellation was a lot bloodier than that of the Filipinos. The Pakistanis used chains with sharp knives on the ends which they would swing over the shoulder to bite into their backs.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Aug. 4 2022 17:26:55
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3246
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Advice sought for martillo technique (in reply to Ricardo

quote:

ORIGINAL: Ricardo
I still get triggered by the images in Sevilla. Apparently a Klan leader adopted the Capirote to scare people. It is scary, I hate to say.


By age 18 I was no longer religious. I was raised in a strongly Christian milieu. To this day, at age 84, Christian rituals sometimes resonate emotionally, though it has been nearly seven decades since I saw religion as intellectually valid.

At Semana Santa in Sevilla I have been moved by the religious pageantry. The processions of the Virgen de la Macarena and the Dios del Gran Poder, with their saetas, their own slow pasodobles played by their marching bands, the drums and bugles and the magnificent images have at times captured my feelings.

The Penitentes at Sevilla in their capirotes don't scare me.

What have scared me have been some of the midnight torchlight processions of the Mystic Krew of Comus and Rex at Mardi Gras in New Orleans, fifty years ago.

For Comus the street lights and all other illumination were completely shut off, leaving the street and the crowded sidewalks in thick darkness. It stayed that way for quite a while. Then the distant glow of torchlight could be made out, dimly.

The procession slowly drew nearer. The members of the Krew stood along the sides of huge wooden wagons, the wheels six feet high. The wagons were concealed in a secret place all year except for the parade. A friend, whose uncle spent $20,000 per year on Mardi Gras, told me the wagons dated from the 19th century. When the procession was near enough, you could see that the wagons were drawn not by horses, mules or oxen, but by tall, heavily muscled, shirtless, sweating Black men, hauling on thick ropes, three men to a rope, four ropes to a wagon. They were accompanied by Black men carrying three foot torches, which cast a flickering yellow light and rippling shadows.

King Comus's costume was supported by a light framework making him appear 15 feet tall and six feet wide. His head and face were covered by the same fabric as his immense robe. Everyone else in the Krew wore the same eerily cheerful white plastic full-face mask. The shoulder-to-shoulder crowd of the Krew on the wagons looked like a cloned herd of pale emotionless aliens staring down at the crowd on the sidewalks

At length, Comus was followed by Rex, the last Krew, also anonymous and masked, also hauled on huge wagons drawn by Black men. All the Mardi Gras krews threw fake coins with their logos, cheap necklaces and other souvenirs to the crowd, who shouted "Hey Mister, Hey Mister!" Though Rex were anonymous, the King was always a well known celebrity. Every few blocks King Rex threw a 20-dollar gold piece into the street, followed by surges of pandemonium and fights.

Both were secret societies, as were many of the other Mardi Gras krews. When the City Council passed an ordinance forbidding any organization to parade unless they published their membership, intended as a blow against racism, Comus refused to identify its members and stopped parading. I suppose they continued to participate in the invitation-only Midnight Ball with Rex, after the parade.

The two weeks leading up to Ash Wednesday in New Orleans were unlike anything else I have experienced, including Carnaval in Rio de Janeiro.

The floats at the Sambodrome in Rio are far larger and more elaborate than the traditional ones at New Orleans. The intricately choreographed and costumed massed dances of Rio's samba schools are more impressive than New Orleans's many 200-member high school bands with rows of sexy teenaged majorettes stepping out in style. The spirit of Carnaval is more frantic, drunken and openly sexual than the laid back laissez le bon temps rouler of New Orleans.

But nothing at Rio paralleled the menacingly racist coda of the two aristocratic krews on the night of Mardi Gras in New Orleans.

That was scary.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Aug. 5 2022 21:13:11
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