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BarkellWH

Posts: 3247
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

Raise a Glass to France! 

I, for one, shall raise a copita of jerez to salute France this evening. The polls so far are showing Macron winning over le Pen 65.9% to 34.1%. First the Netherlands, and now France. It looks like the far Right's momentum in Europe has been checked. It will be interesting to see the results of the legislative elections for the National Assembly coming up.

Piwin, you and your countrymen have demonstrated greater maturity than we have across the pond.

Cheers! Vive la France!

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 7 2017 18:41:03
 
Piwin

Posts: 3298
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to BarkellWH

Thanks Bill. Cheers!
My first thoughts are:
1- what a relief!
2- more than a third of my fellow countrymen voted FN, a party founded by the neofascist movement Ordre nouveau back in the 70s with assistance from the Italian MSI, which comprised many members of Mussolini's former inner-circle; a party that has a long history of overt racism and revisionism. It's disturbing to say the least. How Macron fares in the next five years will probably determine whether the extreme right continues to rise or whether it finally abates.
3- the traditional parties are all but dead. None of them made it to the second round. It will be interesting to see what shape the political landscape will take in the years to come. Macron is shaking up the traditional left/right divide in France. He's on the left on social issues but his economic positions (liberal) are closer to those of the right. He's really a Democrat in the US sense of the term, and that doesn't really fit anywhere in the French political spectrum.
4- expect some major strikes in the next few years. But I guess that's no surprise. It's France after all!
But for now, I'm going to stick with the "what a relief" part, and enjoy that feeling while it last.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 7 2017 20:21:46
 
Fitz63

 

Posts: 104
Joined: May 16 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Piwin

Wish that I drank! But if i did, I would. We're thinking of moving the family back to France soon, and away from so-called British 'values'.
If 75% voted, 35% is only 25% of the country? Still a long way away from a majority.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 7 2017 20:41:04
 
Piwin

Posts: 3298
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Fitz63

quote:

Still a long way away from a majority


It is. But before these elections the highest they had ever scored was around 18%. Which is why they're already spinning this as a win.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 7 2017 21:27:15
 
Fitz63

 

Posts: 104
Joined: May 16 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Piwin

Sadly, it looks like things will get worse before there is any possibility of improvement.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 7 2017 22:13:36
 
Piwin

Posts: 3298
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Fitz63

Btw, where in France did you used to live (since you said "move back to France")?

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 6:50:15
 
Fitz63

 

Posts: 104
Joined: May 16 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to BarkellWH

Aix en Provence, but we'd probably go to Tours, my wife's home town. Where are you?

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 7:56:29
 
Escribano

Posts: 6254
Joined: Jul. 6 2003
From: England, living in Italy

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Piwin

quote:

Btw, where in France did you used to live (since you said "move back to France")?


I agree with these sentiments. Like Fitz, I lived in France and it's back on my list after Brexit. I was near Fréjus, on the Côte d'Azur and also worked for Apple in Paris.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 7:59:29
 
Piwin

Posts: 3298
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Fitz63

Nice. I'll admit the South-East of France is probably the area I know the least. When I'm headed in that direction, I usually stop at the mountains to the north and get lost hiking.
When I was growing up, Tours had a little bit of a reputation as being sort of snotty. Every time I've been it's been very nice so I'm not exactly sure where that reputation comes from.

I'm not living in France anymore but I'm originally from Brittany but spent a lot of my childhood in Nantes, which is not technically Brittany, but let's say it's under heavy breton influence. It's kind of a game at this point, the people from Nantes claim to be breton and the actual bretons make fun of them for it. I then did what a lot of French people do, i.e. move to Paris because that's where the work is and then do everything you can to get out of there because of the awful quality of living. It's like what Jacques Brel said about New York: "I don't hate New York per se. I just hate being there."

@Escribano
Isn't Fréjus sort of a FN stronghold? You sure know how to pick 'em

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 8:38:21
 
Fitz63

 

Posts: 104
Joined: May 16 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to BarkellWH

Aix was/is a kind of service trade town. Lots of things aimed at tourists and weekend visitors from Paris on the TGV. But Marseille is close by, and we probably should have spent more time there. There was no where to play in Aix, just the terraces. And that was brutal.
Tours seems well off, maybe a bit snobby, but with plenty of young people, which I feel helps. The longest I've spent there in one go was a month so we'll have to see if it works. The biggest problem for me with France is work. I mainly work using music with people with disabilities, and I don't think that happens in France. At least not in the same way.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 8:56:43
 
hamia

 

Posts: 378
Joined: Jun. 25 2004
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to BarkellWH

quote:

ORIGINAL: BarkellWH

I, for one, shall raise a copita of jerez to salute France this evening. The polls so far are showing Macron winning over le Pen 65.9% to 34.1%. First the Netherlands, and now France. It looks like the far Right's momentum in Europe has been checked. It will be interesting to see the results of the legislative elections for the National Assembly coming up.

Piwin, you and your countrymen have demonstrated greater maturity than we have across the pond.

Cheers! Vive la France!

Bill


FN's policies are not particularly 'far right' - many are actually rather socialist. Le Pen gets looked down on because of two things. Her father - from whom she has made credible efforts to distance herself. And the fact that she wants to stop immigration. Looking at the state of France these days who can blame her? Anyone wanting to stop immigration is labelled a nazi these days. In my opinion multiculturalism is the greatest disaster to hit Europe. It fragments and destroys what was a previously cohesive community, breaking down trust and common ground between residents. You can see this in many UK and European cities. Take the East End of London as an example. This is not to say the immigrants are inherently 'bad' but some cultures are too far apart to integrate successfully.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 13:25:55
 
Johnc

Posts: 112
Joined: Apr. 16 2011
From: UK

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to hamia

quote:

It fragments and destroys what was a previously cohesive community


you mean like during WWI and WWII?

john
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 13:39:07
 
Ricardo

Posts: 12998
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to hamia

quote:

In my opinion multiculturalism is the greatest disaster to hit Europe. It fragments and destroys what was a previously cohesive community, breaking down trust and common ground between residents. You can see this in many UK and European cities. Take the East End of London as an example. This is not to say the immigrants are inherently 'bad' but some cultures are too far apart to integrate successfully.


I have been meaning to ask about the seriousness (or not) on this issue. Particularly some social media friends (rightish wingers) constantly post these horror stories of Muslim community bullying everyone and "taking over" all of Europe, and I wonder how exaggerated all that is. So is it a serious issue for folks that live there or is it grossly exaggerated?

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 13:46:45
 
Escribano

Posts: 6254
Joined: Jul. 6 2003
From: England, living in Italy

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Ricardo

quote:

So is it a serious issue for folks that live there or is it grossly exaggerated?


No, it's not and yes, it is.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 14:11:42
 
Dudnote

Posts: 1799
Joined: Nov. 13 2007
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Ricardo

quote:

ORIGINAL: Ricardo

quote:

In my opinion multiculturalism is the greatest disaster to hit Europe. It fragments and destroys what was a previously cohesive community, breaking down trust and common ground between residents. You can see this in many UK and European cities. Take the East End of London as an example. This is not to say the immigrants are inherently 'bad' but some cultures are too far apart to integrate successfully.


I have been meaning to ask about the seriousness (or not) on this issue. Particularly some social media friends (rightish wingers) constantly post these horror stories of Muslim community bullying everyone and "taking over" all of Europe, and I wonder how exaggerated all that is. So is it a serious issue for folks that live there or is it grossly exaggerated?

In my experience it's grossly exaggerated.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 14:12:11
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to BarkellWH

quote:

FN's policies are not particularly 'far right' - many are actually rather socialist. Le Pen gets looked down on because of two things. Her father - from whom she has made credible efforts to distance herself. And the fact that she wants to stop immigration. Looking at the state of France these days who can blame her? Anyone wanting to stop immigration is labelled a nazi these days. In my opinion multiculturalism is the greatest disaster to hit Europe. It fragments and destroys what was a previously cohesive community, breaking down trust and common ground between residents. You can see this in many UK and European cities. Take the East End of London as an example. This is not to say the immigrants are inherently 'bad' but some cultures are too far apart to integrate successfully.

This is hilarious.
Yes, everyone knows homogenous societies are the most successful......

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 14:15:55
 
Fitz63

 

Posts: 104
Joined: May 16 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to hamia

quote:

ORIGINAL: hamia

FN's policies are not particularly 'far right' - many are actually rather socialist. Le Pen gets looked down on because of two things. Her father - from whom she has made credible efforts to distance herself. And the fact that she wants to stop immigration. Looking at the state of France these days who can blame her? Anyone wanting to stop immigration is labelled a nazi these days. In my opinion multiculturalism is the greatest disaster to hit Europe. It fragments and destroys what was a previously cohesive community, breaking down trust and common ground between residents. You can see this in many UK and European cities. Take the East End of London as an example. This is not to say the immigrants are inherently 'bad' but some cultures are too far apart to integrate successfully.


'The immigrationist religion is an insult for human beings, whose integrity is always bound to one national community, one language, one culture.'
Speech of Marine Le Pen at the summer festival of Frejus, Front National (September 2016)

I personally can't agree with this definition of what defines a human being. In this theory I should be proud to be British, be happy to be defined be my English language and be studying Morris dancing instead of flamenco!

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 14:19:39
 
Escribano

Posts: 6254
Joined: Jul. 6 2003
From: England, living in Italy

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Fitz63

quote:

In this theory I should be proud to be British, be happy to be defined be my English language and be studying Morris dancing instead of flamenco!


You'll fall off the bonnet

I have always struggled with the belief that we are defined by the country of our birth, as if we had a say in it. More commonly referred to as "patriotism" - "traitor" or "libtard" being the opposite, apparently.

I have been called "traitorous scum" for my pro-European views, so I guess my interest in flamenco only strengthens that argument.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 14:28:20
 
Fitz63

 

Posts: 104
Joined: May 16 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Escribano

quote:

ORIGINAL: Escribano

quote:

In this theory I should be proud to be British, be happy to be defined be my English language and be studying Morris dancing instead of flamenco!


You'll fall off the bonnet



I struggled to find something but I was sure it would be there - 'Although it is not quite as tedious, it does have a similar resemblance to Morris dancing, if only in the folksy way that they both dress.'

http://www.andalucia.com/flamenco/verdiales.htmL

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 14:38:11
 
Dudnote

Posts: 1799
Joined: Nov. 13 2007
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Johnc

quote:

ORIGINAL: Johnc

quote:

It fragments and destroys what was a previously cohesive community


you mean like during WWI and WWII?

Battle of the Medway, 43
Hastings, 1066
Naseby, 14 June 1645
Blenheim, 13 August 1704
Culloden, 16 April 1746
Waterloo, 18 June 1815
Balaclava, 25 October 1854
The Somme, July – November 1916
El Alamein, 23 October – 4 November 1942
Rorke’s Drift, 22-23 January 1879
D-Day: Normandy, 6 June 1944
Etc etc

ah yes the good old days of cohesion, when cousins could copulate with cousins and nations never ventured beyond their own well defined and self imposed boundaries.

To paraphrase our own Stephan Faulks ... ignorance is ignorance is ignorance is ignorance.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 15:13:47
 
Piwin

Posts: 3298
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Ricardo

Ricardo,

tldr: yes it's blown out of proportion.

well I can only speak for what I've seen in France (and obviously even there it's just my own subjective opinion).
But the idea that some would put forward, that people voted FN (that is still classified as extreme right by any neutral institution, even if those of that political tendency would have us think otherwise) because of immigration is way overblown, if not even just a myth. One needs merely look at a map and compare where people voted FN and where the immigrants are. And there's no real correlation at the obvious exception of Calais. What emerges is that the areas where the FN got the highest results are those where unemployment is high, the French rust belt basically. It's like Leopold Sedar Senghor wrote: "racists are just people who are angry at the wrong thing".

Now regarding immigration per say, obviously you can discard the ideas spread by the likes of Foxnews according to which there are "no-go zones". The first time they talked about no-gone zones were during the urban riots about a decade ago. I lived in one of those areas and remember laughing at how it was being described as a war zone. A pretty similar reaction than what the Swedish had recently when Trump announced they were apparently under attack when they clearly weren't aware of anything happening...since nothing was happening! It's quite simple, there's simply no area, neighbourhood or district in France where the crime rates come anywhere near what they are in the worst areas of the US.

That's obviously not to say that there aren't areas that are less safe than others since there obviously are. And anyone who tries to create a correlation between crime in those areas and indicators like race or religion are merely doing so based on subjective perception. Why? Because it's illegal in France to compile any statistics based on race or religion. So you simply can't have the data to support a claim that there is more crime or whatever else in areas that are predominantly (add whatever race or religion you want). That data simply doesn't exist.
I have one friend who is a Berber Christian who told me he had been threatened several times by his Muslim neighbours but that's the only case I know of.

A few years ago, Foxnews relayed a video by a Jewish Israeli allegedly showing how unsafe it was for him to walk around Paris for an hour, how Muslim youths were threatening him etc. etc.. We'll pass on the ties this guy has to an organisation promoting the return of all Jews to Israel, so clearly he had some motivation for his video. After that video, a French Jewish journalist went around for 6 months in Paris and in the rest of France, including in some of the sketchiest neighbourhoods, wearing a kippa. He came back with Nothing bad at all, no threats, no one spitting on him, just hours of footage of Muslim women saying "shalom, is that how you say it?" to which he'd replied "yeah thanks, salam!" or youths wearing hoodies (OMG HOODIES!!) inviting to sit for a cup of tea. Of course this never made it on Foxnews.

Observers in the US tend to map on to Europe the free speech issues they're having in some of their universities, but that simply does not apply in France. Different history, different culture and different laws. As someone said above, there has been an effort by the FN to "normalise" itself, to distance itself from its past. This has been done not by changing any of their policies, which are still very much the same as they've always been, but by trying to soften some of their language. In a way, they did exactly what the intelligent design campaign did in the states. It's still creationism, but we'll change the words and see if we can make that constitutional. And now that they have this brand new vocabulary, their approach has been basically to depict any conflicting opinion as an attempt to bully them into silence. They don't want free speech, they have it. It's enshrined in the Constitution. What they want is for people to just shrug when they're acting like a dick instead of saying "hey, you're acting like a dick". So the alleged bullying they're suffering from is really just a political ploy to try and shift the moral standard down a degree so that their ideas seem socially acceptable when they're really not. It's also a way to divert the discussion away from the actual programme they're proposing and bring it only on this non-existent free speech issue. Le Pen showed what this is about during the debate last Thursday. She spent all her time attacking her opponent and complaining about how she was being misrepresented instead of actually talking about her programme. And the reason is simple: her programme is as extreme right as it always was.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 15:16:13
 
Piwin

Posts: 3298
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Escribano

quote:

No, it's not and yes, it is.


I need to take a page from your book and try to keep my posts short and to the point.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 16:27:20
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3247
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to hamia

quote:

FN's policies are not particularly 'far right' - many are actually rather socialist. Le Pen gets looked down on because of two things. Her father - from whom she has made credible efforts to distance herself. And the fact that she wants to stop immigration. Looking at the state of France these days who can blame her? Anyone wanting to stop immigration is labelled a nazi these days. In my opinion multiculturalism is the greatest disaster to hit Europe. It fragments and destroys what was a previously cohesive community, breaking down trust and common ground between residents. You can see this in many UK and European cities. Take the East End of London as an example. This is not to say the immigrants are inherently 'bad' but some cultures are too far apart to integrate successfully.


Hamia, the immigration question is only a part of her program that puts le Pen on the Far Right. She does not want France to be in a globalized economy and wants to go back to a 1930s-style "nationalist" system; she wants to pull France out of the European Union; she wants to pull France out of NATO, the most successful alliance in history; she harks back to a "France" that probably never existed. In short, if you substituted "Italy" for "France" and the year 1922 for 2017, you would have thought it was Mussolini running for office.

I do think that France, Italy, and other European countries have to get a grip on the unchecked illegal migrants that come from everywhere, from Syria to a half dozen African countries. It is not Europe's responsibility to take them all in just because they show up on the shores of Italy and Greece, many of them are just seeking economic opportunity. Nevertheless, le Pen doesn't want much to do with legal immigration either. She is a staunch "nationalist" of the old Mussolini-style Fascist brand. That is not good for France, not good for Europe, and indeed not good for the entire Western World.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 8 2017 17:33:23
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1732
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Piwin

quote:

And anyone who tries to create a correlation between crime in those areas and indicators like race or religion are merely doing so based on subjective perception. Why? Because it's illegal in France to compile any statistics based on race or religion.


Trying to squelch debate by making any factual basis for it impossible? Couldn’t that backfire?

And doesn't it have alarming effects on disciplines like sociology and ethnology? Not to mention genetics, medicine etc.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 9 2017 1:09:42
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to BarkellWH

Le pen is far right, she's nowhere near center consensus.

I always wonder, not that it makes any matter, but how many anti-immigrant people have older and deceased family members who were pro colonization by France in Africa? Just something that ticks through my mind.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 9 2017 1:44:41
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
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RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to BarkellWH

It looks like at midday here in East Asia that the Koreans are giving the axe to the right wingers. The left Democrats are taking presidential election today.

The last election in Korea was called the blue hair Revolution because if all the old conservative people to voted for the now impeached former president. The younger voters are turning out.
This is good news for many reasons not least of which is that the old regime was anti North Korea and antagonized the peace efforts. They scuttled a joint industrial park plan that was a north ,/ south co-op.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 9 2017 5:04:40
 
Piwin

Posts: 3298
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Paul Magnussen

quote:

Trying to squelch debate by making any factual basis for it impossible? Couldn’t that backfire? And doesn't it have alarming effects on disciplines like sociology and ethnology? Not to mention genetics, medicine etc.


No the intent was never to squelch debate. The intent was to prevent any form of discrimination or stigmatisation of minorities. Whether that's the way to go or not, I don't know. I do think it's helped focus the public debate on things that actually matter. When I look at public discourse on crime in some countries and how it's stalling on the issue of race when it's clearly a matter of poverty, well I'm kind of glad we can cut to the chase here. Note, some people who want positive discrimination also want this law to fall so that they can set up their brand of identity politics in France.

There are exceptions granted for research purposes but there are very stringent rules on how that research must be conducted. That mainly concerns sociological studies since the harder sciences require stringent definition, which "ethnic group", "race", or other such terms simply are not.

Not too long ago, I saw one of those feel-good young-leftist video with a young woman dressing up in the garb of different ethnic groups and reading through her "genetic profile". I am 12% this, or 15% that, concluding with the motto "I am immigration". It was all well and good but oh so American. The reaction on the French forum I was on was basically this: "right. so you're 12% Italian. so you're saying that if we go back far enough in your genealogy we're going to find someone who's 100% Italian? So pure Italian huh? Pure races huh... Do you realize who you sound like? Besides, what does any of it even mean? and where's the breaking point because obviously if you go back far enough you can just drop your percentage and say we're all African right?"
I think they would have agreed with the overall message she was trying to convey that we're all the result of some form of immigration somewhere in our past, but man that whole genetic percentages thing did no go down well!

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 9 2017 6:34:35
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
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RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to BarkellWH

I'm 50℅ a®¢hole, so there's always that to factor in.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 9 2017 9:02:09
 
hamia

 

Posts: 378
Joined: Jun. 25 2004
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to Leñador

quote:

ORIGINAL: Leñador

quote:

FN's policies are not particularly 'far right' - many are actually rather socialist. Le Pen gets looked down on because of two things. Her father - from whom she has made credible efforts to distance herself. And the fact that she wants to stop immigration. Looking at the state of France these days who can blame her? Anyone wanting to stop immigration is labelled a nazi these days. In my opinion multiculturalism is the greatest disaster to hit Europe. It fragments and destroys what was a previously cohesive community, breaking down trust and common ground between residents. You can see this in many UK and European cities. Take the East End of London as an example. This is not to say the immigrants are inherently 'bad' but some cultures are too far apart to integrate successfully.

This is hilarious.
Yes, everyone knows homogenous societies are the most successful......


Well, for instance the Scandinavian countries and also Holland were rather homogeneous societies until fairly recently. It can reasonably be argued that the recent large scale immigration, in particular by immigrants from very different cultures, is having a powerful divisive effect on their society.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 9 2017 9:15:59
 
Piwin

Posts: 3298
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: Raise a Glass to France! (in reply to estebanana

quote:

I'm 50℅ a®¢hole, so there's always that to factor in.


Well, better 50% than 0%. I read an article recently about a South American scorpion that has the ability to self-amputate its tail like lizards. The only problem is that he can't grow it back and by cutting off his tail he's in effect cutting off his anus, thereby becoming 0% a**hole. He ends up swelling up and dying because of the build-up of poop. It's basically a reverse Winnebago trickster (I'm calling dibs on that one for the name of my next band). Once he's buttless, he runs around trying to reproduce to ensure that a next generation of horny constipated scorpions can do the same.
I'm sure there's a moral to this somewhere.

@hamia. The thing is, any kind of change can destabilize or divide a society. And those changes can come from within or from without and vary in intensity. But to say that something has the potential of dividing a society doesn't mean that it is necessarily bad. The US almost imploded over the issue of slavery and racial equality, yet I don't think many people today would argue that the abolitionists and later on the civil rights activists should have just let it slide. Many countries are still coping with the endless flow of change coming from automation. It's definitely taken its toll but I don't think anyone is arguing that we should go back to a pre-automation society. The same goes for multiculturalism. Even if you could prove that multiculturalism is in fact what has caused this "divise effect", then all you would have done is prove that societies need time to adapt to change but you'd be no closer to proving that multiculturalism itself is the problem.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 9 2017 9:39:01
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