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112 jazz chords   You are logged in as Guest
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Dudnote

Posts: 1805
Joined: Nov. 13 2007
 

112 jazz chords 

A nice little warm up exercise for the left hand...


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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 11 2016 9:38:40
 
Gabewolf

 

Posts: 67
Joined: Feb. 12 2016
From: Cleveland, Ohio

RE: 112 jazz chords (in reply to Dudnote

That's cool! Super helpful as I have to learn of these chords for my music theory classes.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 11 2016 16:37:58
 
Dudnote

Posts: 1805
Joined: Nov. 13 2007
 

RE: 112 jazz chords (in reply to Gabewolf

quote:

ORIGINAL: Gabewolf
That's cool! Super helpful as I have to learn of these chords for my music theory classes.



I found it quite challenging for the brain in places

This is a nice intro to alt chords


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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 11 2016 16:47:49
 
Gabewolf

 

Posts: 67
Joined: Feb. 12 2016
From: Cleveland, Ohio

RE: 112 jazz chords (in reply to Dudnote

That stuff is interesting, I recently showed my music teacher the flamenco phrygian scale and I think he's hooked on flamenco now! He's a jazz guy, and was able to explain the theory to me about flamenco being built around the harmonic minor scales. He was also showing me how Charlie Parker used that scale in a jazz context after spending some time in Barcelona, it sounded like jazz but with that subtle mysterious flamenco timbre behind it.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 11 2016 17:53:04
 
Ricardo

Posts: 14970
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: 112 jazz chords (in reply to Gabewolf

quote:

ORIGINAL: Gabewolf

That stuff is interesting, I recently showed my music teacher the flamenco phrygian scale and I think he's hooked on flamenco now! He's a jazz guy, and was able to explain the theory to me about flamenco being built around the harmonic minor scales. He was also showing me how Charlie Parker used that scale in a jazz context after spending some time in Barcelona, it sounded like jazz but with that subtle mysterious flamenco timbre behind it.


I always found it interesting that the famous Dominant7#9 chord COULD be what defines the "flamenco" scale, that being a phrygian dominant scale that contains both the major and minor third, but is rarely implied harmonically...probably because it is more of a jazzy bluesy sounding chord. A regular old major chord with an added flat 9th, or dominant 7 with flat 9, is instead the more proper "flamenco" chord despite the dissonant color of using the minor 3rd melodically against the major 3 in the harmony. Anyway the 7#9 chord is weird for me theory wise as it seems more like a dominant chord with both major and minor thirds involved. The only time we have a real #9 context would be over the VI chord in a minor key, evoking harmonic minor, and even then the resultant sound is more like a minor chord with major 7th. And super locrian that uses the 7#9 harmony is clearly not spelled correctly in context (b9 and #9 in the same scale makes no sense, it's really a b4th that makes the sound). Likewise, I don't feel the 7b5 chord is correct, even in super locrian. By spelling it's properly the inversion of 7#11 chord (super locrian implying truly lydian dominant). And also 7#5 is only ever 7b13 for the same reasons.

In the end the #9s and b5 #5 etc over dominant chords are tools or tricks for sight reading charts easier or improvising clever "wrong" scales to spice up a progression when improvising, so it sounds complex but takes little thought on the fly once you become systematic with it.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 12 2016 5:04:36
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