Foro Flamenco


Posts Since Last Visit | Advanced Search | Home | Register | Login

Today's Posts | Inbox | Profile | Our Rules | Contact Admin | Log Out



Welcome to one of the most active flamenco sites on the Internet. Guests can read most posts but if you want to participate click here to register.

This site is dedicated to the memory of Paco de Lucía, Ron Mitchell, Guy Williams, Linda Elvira, Philip John Lee, Craig Eros, Ben Woods, David Serva and Tom Blackshear who went ahead of us.

We receive 12,200 visitors a month from 200 countries and 1.7 million page impressions a year. To advertise on this site please contact us.





The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay   You are logged in as Guest
Users viewing this topic: none
  Printable Version
All Forums >>Discussions >>General >> Page: [1] 2    >   >>
Login
Message<< Newer Topic  Older Topic >>
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1806
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay 

I’ve just read that Gerald Howson, the author of The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay, died on 7 June, aged 88.

He was kind enough to write me an appreciative note for my review of it on Amazon; which led to a correspondence.

In this he elucidated some of the pseudonyms he used in the book; and since all those concerned are now gone, I feel free to pass this information on, for the benefit of those members who may be interested:

‘Yes, Efren was Eloy [Blanco] and Serafín de Algondonales was Felix de Utrera. Porfirio Díaz was Amós Rodríguez, the brother of Beni de Cádiz. I renamed him after a Mexican general for a joke.’

RIP.

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 31 2014 3:39:05
 
estebanana

Posts: 9390
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Paul Magnussen

Hats off to Gerald Howson!

Great writer, must have been a terribly fun guy to talk to.

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Aug. 4 2014 22:31:07
 
dhyandeva

 

Posts: 2
Joined: Sep. 28 2011
 

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Paul Magnussen

And who was El Canario?
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 8 2014 1:54:44
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3435
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Paul Magnussen

This sad occasion finally prompted me to repair my ignorance. I ordered the Bold Strummer edition with the 1993 postscript from https://www.danzeffguitars.com. I'm about halfway through. The book is both highly informative and very entertaining-- a great read.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 18 2014 0:27:33
 
estebanana

Posts: 9390
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Paul Magnussen

Donde' esta Enrique?

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 19 2014 2:53:52
 
Morante

 

Posts: 2202
Joined: Nov. 21 2010
 

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Paul Magnussen

Everything goes in cycles. I remember meeting Gerald briefly in London, when he was elderly, but was delighted to know that I lived in Cádiz.

He lived here in la época de oro and he left when the héroes had died. He knew very well what he had lived and he left when it was over.

When I arrived, it was an época de plata. There were great artists such as Chano Lobato, Mariana Cornejo, jondo artistas such as Juan Villar or Ángel Pastor, encyclopedic cantaores such as Juan Silva or José Millán and my great friend and great luthier Rafael López, who was also a fine guitarist and a great juerguista. In the taller I met and made friends of all the flamencos de Cádiz.
We had innumerable juergas with Rafael, sometimes I could accompany Mariana, her amiga Pepi, Angel Pastor , and I accompanied José in many communions, bodas etc for the gente de la barrio de Santa María. And I recorded both Juan and José.

Now, most of these great artistas have died. The young artists have become more professional and have gone to live in Sevilla or Madrid, where the contracts are made. Juergas have died.

Thanks to the fascist government, which has diverted money from the poor to the rich, people no longer go out at night for tapas: Cádiz now is dead at night. And thanks to the mindless Ayuntamiento, Cádiz has lost all its industry and many parts of its University.

Still. I am happy here and hope with a change of políticos, there will be another época dorada.

Ojalá.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 19 2014 15:16:16
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1806
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Morante

quote:

Thanks to the fascist government, which has diverted money from the poor to the rich, people no longer go out at night for tapas


Are you talking about the current administration? I grant you that all governments have far more fascist characteristics than they’ll admit to; but even so, it seems strange terminology when the country had a self-admittedly fascist one for nearly 40 years…

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 19 2014 17:03:38
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1806
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to dhyandeva

quote:

And who was El Canario?


He didn’t tell me —probably slipped his mind.

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 19 2014 17:05:09
 
Morante

 

Posts: 2202
Joined: Nov. 21 2010
 

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Paul Magnussen

quote:


Are you talking about the current administration?


If you lived in Spain, you wouldn´t have to ask: the whole party is under investigation for corruption (the "crisis" is mostly due to the billions they have stolen), all their policies are designed to redirect money from the poor to the rich. The number of millionaires has doubled, the number of families thrown out of their homes has tripled, unemployment is at an all time high, it is calculated that a normal family has lost 1000 euros a month, employers have the right to dismiss employees at a whim...I could go on Yet they appear on tele with cara de cemento, saying that black is white, with no sign of remorse. And nobody resigns, even when they are imputado!
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 19 2014 20:10:27
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3462
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Morante

Speaking of Cadiz, I would like to recommend a newly-published (in English translation) novel by the Spanish author Arturo Perez-Reverte entitled "The Siege." The siege in question is a historical fact that occurred in 1811 when French forces laid siege to Cadiz during the Peninsular War, which was a sideshow in the greater effort by Napolean to conquer Europe. It provides the backdrop for a murder mystery. Several women are murdered in Cadiz during the siege, and although they at first appear to be random, police comisario Rogelio Tizon notices a pattern. In the quest for answers Cadiz becomes a giant chessboard.

This novel bears some resemblance to the short story by Jorge Luis Borges entitled "Death and the Compass." In Borges' story, a city (patterned after Buenos Aires) experiences several murders that fall into a pattern, both in terms of the dates they are committed and that they each have a note beside the victim that states, "The first letter of the Name has been uttered," The second letter of the Name has been uttered," etc. The inspector determines he is dealing with the Tetragrammaton and employs Kabbalistic references to determine how to find the murderer.

Both Perez-Reverte and Borges are first-rate authors of mystery (and mysterious!) thrillers. Borges is the more imaginative, but Perez-Reverte is very good, too.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 19 2014 22:24:28
 
estebanana

Posts: 9390
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Paul Magnussen

I loved the Perez-Reverte novel about the hacker who broke into the Vatican computer network...can't rememer the name of the novel. Read it ten years ago.

I have heard form older folks I know that during the Franco years the flamenco could be really good because no one had any money and they had to entertain each other. And that even though Franco was a jerk, he was enthusiastic about Spanish nationalism expressed through the Spanish traditional arts. Without getting into Franco too much I can see how it would have worked that way. Anyone care to comment if you know something about that?

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 20 2014 13:16:42
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1806
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to estebanana

I read somewhere — Donn Pohren, I think — that Franco was actually an aficionado.

Seems bizarre, but stranger things have been known.

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 20 2014 17:29:11
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3462
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Paul Magnussen

quote:

I read somewhere — Donn Pohren, I think — that Franco was actually an aficionado. Seems bizarre, but stranger things have been known.


If you consider that Franco was a Spanish nationalist and Falangist whose policies kept Spain out of the European mainstream, it makes sense. Fascist political leaders usually proclaim the virtues of national traits, and if flamenco is one of the defining national traits of Spain (even though it's origins are particular to Andalucia) it doesn't surprise me that Franco would extol its virtues and even promote it.

I suspect, however, that Franco would not approve of modern versions of flamenco, whatever one calls them--"fusion," "modern," etc. He probably would consider today's flamenco a bastardization of the real (i.e. "traditional") thing, perhaps even a Leftist plot to undermine traditional Spanish values.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 20 2014 18:12:58
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1806
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to BarkellWH

quote:

He probably would consider today's flamenco a bastardization of the real (i.e. "traditional") thing, perhaps even a Leftist plot to undermine traditional Spanish values.


You mean it isn’t??

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 20 2014 19:16:06
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3462
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to estebanana

quote:

I loved the Perez-Reverte novel about the hacker who broke into the Vatican computer network...can't rememer the name of the novel. Read it ten years ago.


"The Seville Communion."

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 21 2014 0:33:05
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3435
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Paul Magnussen

quote:

ORIGINAL: Paul Magnussen

I read somewhere — Donn Pohren, I think — that Franco was actually an aficionado.

Seems bizarre, but stranger things have been known.


In his 1993 postscript, the author of "The Flamencos of Cadiz Bay" reports that Franco liked to listen to flamenco at times. I was surprised, since his government oppressed the Gypsies, and seemed generally opposed to bohemianism.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 21 2014 3:35:39
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3435
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to BarkellWH

I think I have read and enjoyed all of Perez-Reverte's books that have been published in the USA. I recall with particular fondness "The Club Dumas," "The Flanders Panel," "The Seville Communion," "The Queen of the South," and "The Painter of Battles."

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 21 2014 3:44:10
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3435
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Paul Magnussen

quote:

ORIGINAL: Paul Magnussen

quote:

He probably would consider today's flamenco a bastardization of the real (i.e. "traditional") thing, perhaps even a Leftist plot to undermine traditional Spanish values.


You mean it isn’t??


I have been a spectator for two musical revolutions and a latecomer to a third one.

In high school I organized a dance band. In that previous geological era, people danced to the sound of wind instruments, and there were set patterns like the fox trot, the two-step, swing and the like. We learned to improvise in the styles then called "traditional jazz" and "swing." The kids we played for much preferred the big band music of the 1930s to the rather insipid Tin Pan Alley stuff we heard on the radio.

But jazz was undergoing a revolution in harmony, form and style. There was bebop, West Coast, "Modern" etc., all very different from the preceding era. A lot of people really didn't like any of it. I found some of it pretty challenging, but my curiosity was aroused, and I tried to learn what I could about the new stuff. Bebop was too foreign for me to develop any facility at it, but I made some inroads into the other genres.

Thirty years later my Japanese girlfriend and I were at a trendy restaurant in San Francisco. There was a trio, piano, sax and bass. I commented, "Thirty years ago Bird [Charlie Parker] was revolutionary, now everybody plays like him."

The revolution in classical music came before I was born. But it was still new when I played in the Washington Summer Symphony. Stravinsky and Bartok were exotic and difficult, even Hindemith was avant garde. Schoenberg was beyond the pale. Schoenberg still is pretty much beyond the pale for general audiences, but the rest have become standard repertoire.

Today's showbiz flamenco is very different from what I heard in Spain in the late 1950s. Although "Opera Flamenca" and other novel developments had already come to pass, then fallen by the wayside, there was still a lot of flamenco played in public that was closely related to more traditional stuff. It's what I cut my teeth on. I still enjoy playing Ramon Montoya, Sabicas, Escudero and Niño Ricardo, who were the cutting edge in those days.

But no living art form stands still. Paco revolutionized the solo guitar, but he did it step by step. If you stayed with him, he brought you into a new era. I didn't much care for the multi-player stage shows, but they were immensely popular and spread the popularity of flamenco. I say "flamenco" because that's what Paco said it was, and if anyone had standing to define it, I suppose he did.

I went to see Tomatito when he came to Austin chiefly to see the dancer Paloma Fantova. I wasn't disappointed. The rest of the show was a loud, fully rehearsed instrumental sextet, with three singers doing utterly ironed-out, rehearsed recitations. But it was rhythmically and harmonically exciting. I enjoyed it. If you asked me, I would have said it was "derived from flamenco."

You even hear "modern" guitar stuff accompanying traditional cante these days. The singers don't seem to mind. Some seem to like it.

When we look to the past, we hear the stuff that has survived. We listen to Beethoven, but not so much to Clementi. We listen to Mozart and Haydn, but not so much to Hummel and Salieri. Clementi, Hummel and Salieri were competent, charming composers. They just weren't blazing geniuses like Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven. I probably have never even heard the names of the real second-raters of the Classical period.

In flamenco the process of innovation is going on at this moment. A lot of what we hear now will fall by the wayside in the future. But some of it will last, just as Ramon Montoya, Niño Ricardo and Sabicas have survived the passage of time.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 21 2014 4:24:12
 
cristina

 

Posts: 47
Joined: Mar. 7 2014
 

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to estebanana

I lived in Madrid in 1971/72. I'v experienced 2 "sorts" of Flamenco:

the "oficial" one - tourist- and Tablao-stuff, banner of Nationalism.

and the "real": cantaores and guitarists waiting in the CervecerÍa Alemana to get a "gig". waitung for hours. The tradition, that "señoritos" wanted to hear Flamenco puro still existed. A very young gitanillo playing guitar in the street and detained by police. (90 % of the prisoners in Carabanchel were gitanos at that time).
Only in very small bars you could hear two flamencos - cantaor and guitarra.

The artists were kind of divided: it's known that Manolo Caracol get involved with Franco.
But around these years also: Paco de Lucía published the Songs of Federico García Lorca (whose Complete Works were full of white pages, censured),
and Enrique Morente published the poems of Miguel Hernández.
Singing the poem of Miguel Hernandez "Andaluces de Jaen" in the Version of Paco Ibañez in the street was cause enough to be detained.

ciao :-)

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 21 2014 7:18:28
 
cristina

 

Posts: 47
Joined: Mar. 7 2014
 

[Deleted] 

Post has been moved to the Recycle Bin at Nov. 25 2014 9:29:49
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 21 2014 7:28:32
 
estebanana

Posts: 9390
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Paul Magnussen

Richard,

Nice recollections and true about old Arnold S. whom I like a lot. But I'll tell ya, Hummel trumpet concerto, up there with any of Haydn.

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 21 2014 13:52:53
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3435
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to estebanana

As a former kid trumpeter, I would put the Hummel trumpet concerto above the Haydn, good as the Haydn may be.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 21 2014 15:46:14
 
guitarbuddha

 

Posts: 2970
Joined: Jan. 4 2007
 

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Richard Jernigan

(Note, this is supposed to be a joke, do not be distracted by the fact that it isn't funny).


As a fan of Vivaldi and Bach I find the trumpet music of later composers with it's faddish concern with balance over harmonic exploration lacking in the 'puro' qualities of the old masters.

Joseph Haydn's modish adoption of the keyed trumpet.....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trumpet_Concerto_%28Haydn%29

shows, as is so often the case that his brother the less well known Micheal was the greater man and truer to the tradition of upper harmonic playing which had been passed down from father to son for so many years and which these new fangled 'innovations' are destroying.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trumpet_Concerto_%28Michael_Haydn%29

I miss the old days when the trumpet would be ferociously out of tune and a key (c) could be explored properly without the unnessecary distraction of modulating to these new fangled other worlds of related keys and their associated evil the quasi-sonata form.

This 'fusion' of related key centres is truly destructive and is stifling the true nature of Post Renaissance Germanic tonality.

Oh well, tumbleweeds rock.

D.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 21 2014 20:55:14
 
estebanana

Posts: 9390
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Richard Jernigan

quote:

As a former kid trumpeter, I would put the Hummel trumpet concerto above the Haydn, good as the Haydn may be.

RNJ


Well biased as I am, I would give you the Hummel trumpet concerto over any Haydn woodwind or brass concerto. I but stand firm on the two Haydn cello concertos as masterpieces of the highest order, along with the Hummel trumpet.

I've heard the Hummel performed live, it is a fantastic concerto and also one that solidified the classical concerto form and gave other composers something to aim at.

But the Haydn concerto did serve a purpose, which was to take the trumpet farther technically. This radio show is called Classical Classroom, out of Houston Public Media. This show is about the Haydn and it touches on the Hummel.

http://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/news/classical-classroom-episode-60-how-haydn-changed-the-trumpet-forever/

_____________________________

https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 22 2014 8:37:44
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3462
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Richard Jernigan

quote:

I think I have read and enjoyed all of Perez-Reverte's books that have been published in the USA. I recall with particular fondness "The Club Dumas," "The Flanders Panel," "The Seville Communion," "The Queen of the South," and "The Painter of Battles."


They are all first-rate, Richard. I would suggest one more that is very good as well, "The Fencing Master." In fact, "The Fencing Master" was the very first book I read by Perez-Reverte, and it got me hooked. The latest, "The Siege," is perhaps his best, although I realize that is a matter of opinion.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 24 2014 18:24:32
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3435
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to guitarbuddha

quote:

ORIGINAL: guitarbuddha
I miss the old days when the trumpet would be ferociously out of tune ...
D.


Back in the 1980s the International Trumpeters' Guild held its annual convention in Austin. Of course I went to the concerts. Seeing many of the great symphony players stoked a bit of nostalgia, and I loved hearing them play.

But the performance that impressed me most was the Baroque trumpeter Helmut Wobisch. His instrument was twice as long as a modern trumpet, putting the upper harmonics in a manageable range. I had heard Wobisch on several recordings, and was impressed by his secure intonation. Sitting up close I noticed something I was unaware of about Baroque trumpets. Around midway along its length there were two small holes in the tubing. Wobisch covered, uncovered or partially covered these with the first two fingers of his right hand, producing the superbly well tuned performance that impressed the likes of Adolf Herseth.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 24 2014 20:57:37
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3462
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Richard Jernigan

quote:

Back in the 1980s the International Trumpeters' Guild held its annual convention in Austin. Of course I went to the concerts. Seeing many of the great symphony players stoked a bit of nostalgia, and I loved hearing them play.


Symphony trumpeters aside, when I was young my favorite trumpeter was the New Orleans great, Al Hirt. Back in 1964, I was in the Air Force stationed for several months at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi where I was attending training for my AFSC in Air Force intelligence. Biloxi is only 90 miles from New Orleans, and many a weekend I would head for New Orleans to enjoy the French Quarter and other delights. Right in the heart of the French Quarter was Al Hirt's club, in which he could be found performing when he was not on the road. I sat in Al Hirt's club many nights listening to Al play the sweetest trumpet around. Pete Fountain also had his own club in the French Quarter, in which he would play the clarinet when he was not on the road. Between them, Al Hirt and Pete Fountain kept me occupied most weekends in New Orleans, when I probably should have spent more time chasing wild women. I did a little of that, too (without a great deal of success), usually after drinking a couple of Hurricanes at Pat O'Brien's.

Cheers,

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 24 2014 23:41:37
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3435
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to BarkellWH

Mardi Gras in New Orleans 1972, we were wandering about the French Quarter during the day. Pete Fountain and his wife strolled by. Pete, immensely tall and rotund, was dressed in a full rabbit costume. His petite wife was dressed as a carrot.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 25 2014 18:48:05
 
Escribano

Posts: 6422
Joined: Jul. 6 2003
From: England, living in Italy

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Richard Jernigan

Did you ever come across an old acquaintance of mine, Paul Prudhomme, in New Orleans by chance? I took him out for a curry in London in the 90's and he ordered every curry on the menu!

I can recommend his Western chili recipe https://www.chefpaul.com/site.php?pageID=300&view=174 without his branded spices


Sorry, a lot off-topic but I ramble sometimes

_____________________________

Foro Flamenco founder and Admin
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 25 2014 18:58:47
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3462
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: The Flamencos of Cádiz Bay (in reply to Escribano

quote:

Sorry, a lot off-topic but I ramble sometimes


As if some of us don't go off-topic frequently?!

Cheers,

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Nov. 25 2014 20:42:21
Page:   [1] 2    >   >>
All Forums >>Discussions >>General >> Page: [1] 2    >   >>
Jump to:

New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


Forum Software powered by ASP Playground Advanced Edition 2.0.5
Copyright © 2000 - 2003 ASPPlayground.NET

9.326172E-02 secs.