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RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamenco guitars   You are logged in as Guest
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JasonM

Posts: 1565
Joined: Dec. 8 2005
From: Baltimore

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to Andy Culpepper

quote:

IMO solid linings serve to add just a tiny bit of extra rigidity to the rim of the top, effectively shrinking the main vibrating area very slightly. If you ran the chladni patterns you could probably see that the node line of the monopole mode (main top resonance) would be just a wee bit tighter in circumference than with spaced out tentellones. Basically, it's like having a slightly smaller guitar, or at least smaller resonating top area. No effect on sustain, but probably a very slight "higher frequency" effect exactly as Tom describes.


Very cool Andy. Did you learn the chladni from Gore’s book?

Did you also test tentallones with no space in between? I reckon there probably wouldn’t show a lot of change in comparison to solid lining.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 4 2020 13:53:10
 
Tom Blackshear

 

Posts: 2188
Joined: Apr. 15 2008
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to JasonM

quote:

Did you also test tentallones with no space in between? I reckon there probably wouldn’t show a lot of change in comparison to solid lining.


My finding on the Reyes guitar was that there was enough difference on the solid lining to warrant a change from its original to a solid. In fact there is probable cause to make the change for most guitars.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 4 2020 14:38:15
 
Andy Culpepper

Posts: 2923
Joined: Mar. 30 2009
From: NY, USA

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to JasonM

quote:

Very cool Andy. Did you learn the chladni from Gore’s book?

Did you also test tentallones with no space in between? I reckon there probably wouldn’t show a lot of change in comparison to solid lining.


I learned it from Dick Cogger who was my extremely generous teacher and shop mate for my first 26 guitars. I believe that tentellones with no space in between would have the same effect as a solid lining. I did make one guitar like that and it turned out well, but it was a bit harder to make sure each one was seated properly. Now I just put a couple mm of space in between.
Another luthier who I looked up to a lot in the beginning was John Park, and he said that he had visited the Conde shop and seen them gluing tentellones with no space in between. But he preferred to space them out a little, "just so that two of them don't decide to have an argument and pucker the top". His words, which always stuck in my mind
If you want to see something really odd, poke around on Google to see how some of the classical double top makers like Dammann handle the top-side linings. I observed the same thing in a Michel Brück double top. Search "inside Dammann guitar".

_____________________________

Andy Culpepper, luthier
http://www.andyculpepper.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 4 2020 15:03:42
 
JasonM

Posts: 1565
Joined: Dec. 8 2005
From: Baltimore

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to Andy Culpepper

quote:

Search "inside Dammann guitar"


Whoa
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 5 2020 19:31:00
 
mango

Posts: 133
Joined: Apr. 2 2019
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to JasonM

The bindings are installed. I had to fight a lot with those ebony strips... are those always so rebellious?





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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 10 2020 19:09:08
 
Tom Blackshear

 

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Joined: Apr. 15 2008
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to Andy Culpepper

quote:

I observed the same thing in a Michel Brück double top. Search "inside Dammann guitar".


Andy, correct me if I'm wrong but my memory goes back to Yuris Zeltins creating the cross stiffener for the top, which I think actually impedes some of the fuller effect of tonal quality.

I say this as I had access to a 1977 Miguel Rodriguez classical guitar with the converted stiffener, in and out of the guitar quite a few times over the years, and I can attest that the guitar sounded better without it.

And I think that Yuris might agree that most traditional Spanish guitars will collapse between the sound hole and the bridge to a certain point, then stop when they reach their point of resistance to string torgue.

I remember years ago when some master builders would say: If the top doesn't bend a little in this area, then it is not a good guitar :-)

_____________________________

Tom Blackshear Guitar maker
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 10 2020 23:18:11
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3012
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to Tom Blackshear

quote:

ORIGINAL: Tom Blackshear

Andy, correct me if I'm wrong but my memory goes back to Yuris Zeltins creating the cross stiffener for the top, which I think actually impedes some of the fuller effect of tonal quality.

I say this as I had access to a 1977 Miguel Rodriguez classical guitar with the converted stiffener, in and out of the guitar quite a few times over the years, and I can attest that the guitar sounded better without it.

And I think that Yuris might agree that most traditional Spanish guitars will collapse between the sound hole and the bridge to a certain point, then stop when they reach their point of resistance to string torgue.

I remember years ago when some master builders would say: If the top doesn't bend a little in this area, then it is not a good guitar :-)


A friend had a spruce/Brazilian Contreras Sr. "doble tapa" from the early 1990s, which had a cross stiffening brace for the top between the bridge and the soundhole.

The "doble tapa" was actually a spruce double back. The cross stiffener was a piece of rosewood that went from the treble to the bass side of the lower bout, maybe 5/8" below the top. A block of spruce resting on the cross brace contacted the top.

While in Madrid in the early 2000's my friend visited the Contreras shop at Calle Mayor 80. He mentioned the cross brace to Pablo ("Manuel Contreras II), who offered to remove it at no charge.

I liked the guitar better without it. It had a fuller tone.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 11 2020 2:18:26
 
Echi

 

Posts: 826
Joined: Jan. 11 2013
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to JasonM

I think that the suspended bar used by Contreras has a lot to do with Pepe Romero Sr.
Pepe used to be very familiar both with Contreras and Rodriguez and for a time he was a fan of the suspended bar if I’m not wrong.
To say it better, I suppose he was a fan of a loose top close to the transverse bar which probably is the cause of a certain concavity in that area of the top.
As said, Yuris fixed the problem of a collapsed top with a floating bar.

Pepe helped Miguel Rodriguez jr. a lot (I was told it was Pepe bringing to Rodriguez a Contreras to have the top replaced with a Rodriguez top) and made some suggestions to Contreras as well.
One of them should be the suspended bar, which Pepe learned about after Yuris repaired his Rodriguez in such a way.
On the net you can find both the Contreras with the Rodriguez top and the story about the floating bar.

BTW I think Andy meant the huge tentellones used by Dammann while Mango ended up in a page of a restored Dammann with a floating bar added. The first Dammann guitars used to be made really at a step from of collapsing.

The huge peones instead are meant to reduce the size of the plantilla to the same size of a Torres guitar Dammann was in love with.
The Torres guitar was sold by guitarsint 3 years ago while Dammann nowadays uses regular linings.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 11 2020 9:34:40
 
Tom Blackshear

 

Posts: 2188
Joined: Apr. 15 2008
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to Echi

quote:

As said, Yuris fixed the problem of a collapsed top with a floating bar.


Yuris is a great guy and full of ideas how to make things better. The floating bar was his thought on how to keep the Rodriguez guitars with thin tops, from collapsing any further, thereby damaging their collect-ability.

He maintained his position as the king of restoration by being a work horse for many of the West Coast's big shots who requested his help to keep their guitars in good shape.

I've always admired Yuris for his ability to be humble and hang his head all the way to the bank. Great man indeed.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 11 2020 16:31:33
 
Andy Culpepper

Posts: 2923
Joined: Mar. 30 2009
From: NY, USA

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to Echi

quote:

BTW I think Andy meant the huge tentellones used by Dammann while Mango ended up in a page of a restored Dammann with a floating bar added. The first Dammann guitars used to be made really at a step from of collapsing.

The huge peones instead are meant to reduce the size of the plantilla to the same size of a Torres guitar Dammann was in love with.
The Torres guitar was sold by guitarsint 3 years ago while Dammann nowadays uses regular linings.


Yep that is what I meant. That's very interesting, I didn't know that. I thought it was interesting how far up the side they went, but tapered down to normal around the waist.

Looking good mango. Yes, Ebony is one of those woods that would rather break than bend sometimes.

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http://www.andyculpepper.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 11 2020 18:20:51
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3012
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to Tom Blackshear

quote:

ORIGINAL: Tom Blackshear

quote:

As said, Yuris fixed the problem of a collapsed top with a floating bar.


Yuris is a great guy and full of ideas how to make things better. The floating bar was his thought on how to keep the Rodriguez guitars with thin tops, from collapsing any further, thereby damaging their collect-ability.



My friend said that when he asked Pablo Contreras whether the top of his guitar was any different from those without the bar, Pablo assured him they were the same.

I never measured the top of my friend's guitar, nor that of my own 1991 spruce/Brazilian Contreras Sr. doble tapa, but I don't think mine is thin. Both have a brilliant, penetrating tone, which I find a little lacking in warmth. Maybe I would like them better in a bigger room than my 14x22-foot practice room, with high ceiling and hardwood floor.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 11 2020 23:38:56
 
RobF

Posts: 947
Joined: Aug. 24 2017
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to Richard Jernigan

I have a 1980 Contreras Blanca in dire need of attention. It’s signed by him and shows evidence of the supports for a transverse bar across the lower bout stuck on the sides, although the bar is long gone. I’m not sure if the supports for the bar were original as they’re pretty sloppily done.

The guitar is in need of repair and I bought it quite cheaply as a fixer-upper. It was originally a peghead, but had a poorly executed conversion done to it. I have to clean up the conversion slots, fill and redrill the tuner holes, replace the fingerboard and straighten the neck while I’m at it, repair cracks in the top and back, and that’s about it. But the guitar sounds super good, loud and flamenco, the high ‘e’ is something else, so it’ll be worth doing the restoration. It’s also pretty funky looking, in a good way.

It’s been set aside for years awaiting me having the time and inclination to tackle the job. I’ll pull it out of its case over the next few days and have a closer look, take some measurements and tracings, etc.. Maybe it would be a fun isolation project, kind of like a present to myself for all my good behaviour.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 12 2020 0:15:43
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3012
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to RobF

I bought my doble tapa from Manuel Sr. in the summer of 1991. I knew I was heading to Kwajalein in the central Pacific, and I wanted a professional quality classical to take with me.

I tried out instruments in a small back room at the Calle Mayor 80 shop, while Manuel Sr. stood by. He had lost an eye to the illness which eventually took him, but he was at the shop, kind and friendly as always.

In the rack in the room was a spruce/cypress blanca. I picked it up it and played for a while. I liked it a lot. At the time I had not played much classical, so my flamenco chops were a good deal better.

Manuel Sr. immediately recognized Ramon Montoya's Rondeña, saying he liked it a lot. I took it to mean the piece, not necessarily my playing. He asked about a Mario Escudero soleá I played. When I told him who I had copied the piece from, he said he wasn't very familiar with Escudero's work, but it was a nice piece.

As I left, Manuel's niece, who minded the counter out front, mentioned she was going to Juilliard in the fall to study 'cello. When I congratulated her, she said, with a tear in her eye, that she would miss her uncle.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 12 2020 1:46:58
 
Tom Blackshear

 

Posts: 2188
Joined: Apr. 15 2008
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to Richard Jernigan

quote:

In the rack in the room was a spruce/cypress blanca. I picked it up it and played for a while. I liked it a lot. At the time I had not played much classical, so my flamenco chops were a good deal better.


Manuel Sr. flamenco guitars were some of the best in the 1960's; remembering a 1964 that was excellent to my touch. When I came back to work in 1974, I copied this guitar for some of my first builds...........not sure if I still have the plan but it was a good one.

I never could figure out why Manuel never captured a majority of the market place, along with some of the other top builders, but his guitars were certainly of high quality. I'm sure his apprentices benefited from his legacy.

Manuel was a true gentleman. I would have bought one of his guitars while I was in Madrid but the timing wasn't right. So I bought a Felix Manzanero and Jose Ramirez; both good guitars.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 13 2020 15:49:47
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3012
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to Tom Blackshear

Having been to Manuel Contreras Sr.'s shop at Calle Mayor 80 a few times, and Jose Ramirez III's shop at Concepcion Jeronima 2 a number of times, I don't remember ever seeing an identifiably flamenco customer at either.

Nor did I ever see and identifiably "classical" customer at Conde Hermanos Gravina 7 shop. Nobody there but flamencos, as near as I could tell--and a couple of tourists who got ripped off.

I know of one visit by a professional classical player to Conde Hermanos. The daughter of one of my best friends studied at a university in Madrid. She and the classsical pro (whose name I recognized at the time, but don't remember now) went to Conde Hermanos and picked out a new 1973 spruce/cypress blanca for my friend.

I felt sorry for him when it arrived in Texas, though I said nothing about it. For the first year or so it was dead as a doornail. Then it opened up into an excellent instrument, the only one I liked better than my '67 Ramirez at the time.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 14 2020 5:41:23
 
mango

Posts: 133
Joined: Apr. 2 2019
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to JasonM

Yesterday I prepared the fingerboard. It took a while to plane the ebony down to the right thickness... I also had to sharpen the blade of my plane about five times during the process. I know that ebony is a very dense wood, but is it normal that the plane becomes dull so fast?



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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 14 2020 8:14:48
 
Tom Blackshear

 

Posts: 2188
Joined: Apr. 15 2008
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to mango

I think it all depends on where the ebony grows, in what area of mineral content, as I've had several ebony woods in my shop over the years that have had different densities. (Some harder then others).

And it also depends on the cut, as some are harder to manage than others, so I think the answer to finishing a hard piece is just use patience.

Note: Mineral content can have an effect on metal blades.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 14 2020 16:46:10
 
Andy Culpepper

Posts: 2923
Joined: Mar. 30 2009
From: NY, USA

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to JasonM

The guitar looks great. I've never been a fan of cutting the fret slots on the guitar though.
Sharpening the plane iron 5 times sounds like a lot, but there are a lot of factors at play like what type of plane/iron you're using, how you sharpen it, how you use it, and the properties of the wood.
Assuming you have a razor sharp and polished cutting edge, one big no-no I've found is to drag the plane backwards across the work as you prepare for the next cut/stroke. On a hard wood like ebony that will the dull the blade quickly.
It is true that harder woods need more freshly sharpened blades. When yours was no longer cutting the ebony it probably still would have worked fine for Spanish Cedar or even Rosewood.

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Andy Culpepper, luthier
http://www.andyculpepper.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 14 2020 21:49:40
 
mango

Posts: 133
Joined: Apr. 2 2019
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to Andy Culpepper

quote:

one big no-no I've found is to drag the plane backwards across the work as you prepare for the next cut/stroke. On a hard wood like ebony that will the dull the blade quickly.

Perhaps this is a good advice... at least I remember doing this all the time ;-) thanks Andy!
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 17 2020 9:56:51
 
mango

Posts: 133
Joined: Apr. 2 2019
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to JasonM

The frets are installed... I messed up one, had to pull it our again and produced a nasty tearout :-/ fortunately I could finally repair it with superglue. Lesson learned!...
I used some white glue to install which was easy, but next time I will use this triangular file even a bit more. It was a bit hard to let the frets sit really tight.





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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 22 2020 22:19:37
 
mango

Posts: 133
Joined: Apr. 2 2019
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to JasonM

Hey guys,
I am about to make the bridge now. As I want the string holes very close to the soundboard, I better drill them after I created the curve at the bottom to fit to the domed top?
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 24 2020 22:19:57
 
RobF

Posts: 947
Joined: Aug. 24 2017
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to mango

I think you may want to analyze your reasons for having the string holes very close to the soundboard before committing to the decision. I assume it’s to achieve a reasonable break angle, but in reality, something along the lines of 15 degrees is sufficient. There’s no practical need to go further. As a matter of fact, too much break angle just breaks strings. Maybe that’s why it’s called “break” angle, lol.

The problem is if the holes are really close to the top and you drill straight across then you will have to do some serious undercutting to clear the holes on the saddle side. And, if you angle the holes upwards to reduce the undercutting then one has to question why the entry point at the back is so low to start with. What is being gained?

It’s best to determine a placement that will allow sufficient wood under the tie block laminate to be practical both for tying the string, as well as having structural integrity. The holes should be high enough off the top to allow ease of access for your fingers, as well as not being so close that the top is at risk of damage every time a string is changed. Maybe 3mm for the bottom of the hole is a good starting point. With a 7mm tie block and, say, a 1.5mm bone insert, that will place the hole roughly between the bottom of the bridge and the bottom of the bone insert and will give about a 3mm space to thread the string underneath itself when tying. On the other side there will be a rise to the saddle of approximately 3mm or so, if the string height above the top is 8mm. If you want to increase break angle from that, consider moving the saddle slot towards the tie block, as opposed to lowering the holes. Just a thought.

Some makers angle the hole towards the top on the saddle side to increase break angle, leaving the entry point at the back higher. To each their own, but it will increase the undercut, where a 12 hole bridge might be a better idea, if break angle is really such a concern (it isn’t, IMO). Angling it down like that could also lead to more string breakage.

Just thinking out loud, so my numbers might be a tad off...as Ethan said in response to a different question, making a full size drawing isn’t a bad idea.

*edit* come to think of it, I’ve also at times angled the holes downwards too, in order to follow the line of the tie block when I’ve done a low tie block with a forward slant. On those occasions, the reason is so that the holes will clear the tie block’s bone insert at the saddle side of the tie block more than to increase break angle. Forgot about that. The take-away here is to check the line of the holes from the side before drilling to ensure you have proper clearance.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 24 2020 23:01:52
 
Andy Culpepper

Posts: 2923
Joined: Mar. 30 2009
From: NY, USA

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to JasonM

I do drill the holes after I curve the bottom but it probably doesn't matter all that much. I put the center of my holes about 3.5 mm from the bottom of the bridge.

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http://www.andyculpepper.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 24 2020 23:26:43
 
RobF

Posts: 947
Joined: Aug. 24 2017
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to mango

I forgot to mention that, but I also curve the bottom before drilling the holes. If the bridge is clamped flat from the bottom, then the holes will follow the curve of the bridge when it’s unclamped. If having the holes parallel to the tie block is desired, then the bridge can be clamped from the top. If the tie block is going to slant down towards the treble side, then clamping from the bottom is a good idea. I don’t do it the same way every time. I don’t do a lot of things the same way every time, although there’s no reason behind that.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 25 2020 0:46:00
 
El Burdo

 

Posts: 595
Joined: Sep. 8 2011
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to RobF

Just properly looked at your avatar RobF. Great! I wonder what pedals he used?

But, this is a fascinating thread. Look forward to seeing the final result, and maybe to hear it.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 25 2020 11:46:00
 
RobF

Posts: 947
Joined: Aug. 24 2017
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to El Burdo

Haha, I’d like to think he’d have a Cry-Baby Wah and an Echoplex but, from the picture, it looks like he had his Hauser plugged in direct.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 26 2020 3:41:59
 
mango

Posts: 133
Joined: Apr. 2 2019
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to JasonM

Thank you guys!
I gave it a try today. Everything worked pretty good except of the holes :-/ I found it really hard to drill them precise with my drill press. What method do you use to get perfect distances between the holes? On my bridge one hole is about 0.7mm off, so I probably will have to do a second one. And what dimensions do you use for a flamenco bridge. I ended up with very thin wings (2mm). And I decided to use a 3mm saddle to have more freedom to compensate intonation issues, but as the channel cannot be very deep due to low action it looks a bit wide now... better go for a 2mm saddle?



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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 27 2020 23:50:15
 
JasonM

Posts: 1565
Joined: Dec. 8 2005
From: Baltimore

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to mango

Ahh! I did the same thing with the holes on my first bridge too.

Maybe the pros have a better method , but The second time around I marked the hole centers first with an awl, then used a small pilot drill bit in a pin vise to start the holes by hand, and then finally went to the drill press with the final size bit in the chuck.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 28 2020 0:03:28
 
ernandez R

Posts: 351
Joined: Mar. 25 2019
From: Alaska USA

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to JasonM

Mango,
looks like your holes are too big for starters?

Because the grain has softer layers the little drill bit wants to drift. A wipe of thin CA or any other glue will harden up the surface to prevent this. Next is a vary sharp punch to set the exact hole location. I sharpen my mechanical pencil to a razor edge for precise layout. Use lots of light and the ant burners to really see what you are doing.

For most of my drill press work I don’t clamp my work down to the table so I can slide the clamp around to let the drill self center and make micro adjustments; watch the drill bit find center and if the bit bends slide the clamp accordingly to keep it running true. I lube the bit with candle wax before drilling each hole.

Ideally test drill a couple pieces of scrap before you drill into a bridge you just spent hours crafting.

If you want to get the most out of your saddle string angle drill your D string, the B and e holes smaller.

One more thing you might shorten the distance between the aft edge of the saddle slot and the forward edge of the tie block.
This will get you more angle also which is how they make it work without a 12 hole bridge.

You are super close so take your time. I know, impossible!

You got a good line on saddle compensation?

Hope this helps,

HR

_____________________________

I prefer my flamenco guitar spicy,
doesn't have to be fast,
should have some meat on the bones,
can be raw or well done,
as long as it doesn't sound like it's turning green on an elevator floor.

www.instagram.com/threeriversguitars
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 28 2020 1:50:54
 
RobF

Posts: 947
Joined: Aug. 24 2017
 

RE: Bogdanovich´s method for flamen... (in reply to mango

Looking good. Even if you have misgivings, it’s good practice to complete the bridge, regardless, then evaluate the result. The strings will go a long way to mask little discrepancies in the hole spacing and, once on, I suspect nobody but you will notice. Mind you, it will probably drive you nuts, lol. But carrying through to the end is good and might bring to light some more info, and can help clarify things if a second attempt is done. Plus, carrying through may also reveal that everything is acceptable, and a second attempt unnecessary.

A little concerned about the wings, however. Are they 4mm? It can be helpful to sketch the curve on the side of the wing before starting. That can give an idea of how deep the saddle slot can be without compromising the depth of the wing. Remember, the bridge is also a brace; it doesn’t hurt for it to have some mass, there is a sweet spot to the weight and going lighter after that can work against it. Two lines drawn 1/3 of the way in from each edge as witnesses for the initial shaping can help ensure a consistent curve. They can act as starting points for facets shaped between the lines and the edges of the wing.

I liked HR’s advice about using a wipe of CA glue as a stiffener to help reduce bit wander; I’m going to try that hint out myself. I also only clamp the bridge vertically to maintain 90 degrees. I freehand the lateral movement but I use a piece of wood clamped across the table to act as a guide. I also made a little template with equally spaced guide holes, but I’m not convinced it’s any more effective than accurately placed awl punches.

One maker I know in Granada uses a punch with six equally spaced awls to mark the perforations. It’s basically just a piece of wood with the awl nails embedded in it. It also allows marking a consistent distance from the soundboard when rested on the bench and the bridge brought up to it.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 28 2020 13:10:05
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