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zendalex

Posts: 28
Joined: Sep. 4 2010
From: New York area

Concept of practice guitar 

Was wondering if such thing exists, ie is it encouraged to practice on a guitar which is harder to play, eg has high action, or large scale or use no capo when the piece assumes such use. From one point of view, the muscles get exercised which normally would not. But from the other hand, it might redistribute the practice emphasis.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Aug. 18 2018 1:24:07
 
JasonM

Posts: 693
Joined: Dec. 8 2005
From: Baltimore

RE: Concept of practice guitar (in reply to zendalex

Personally I think it’s better to focus effort on good fretting technique than grip strength. Try and find the minimum amount of presssire needed to press down on a string and keeping things relaxed.

I think it’s best to practice on the guitar you intend to play on, practice falsetas in different capo positions but solo pieces it doesn’t matter as much.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Aug. 18 2018 5:47:33
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 2745
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Concept of practice guitar (in reply to zendalex

I don't think it helps at all to practice on a guitar that is harder to play. In fact, it is more likely to hinder your advancement. To practice on a guitar with higher action than you would normally play, for example, is not only more difficult in itself, but makes it more difficult to revert back to playing on one with your desired action. Practice on the guitar you intend to play.

Bill

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Who tried to hustle the East."

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Aug. 18 2018 17:46:13
 
johnnefastis

Posts: 458
Joined: Jan. 10 2012
 

RE: Concept of practice guitar (in reply to zendalex

I have a Yamaha practice guitar and it’s easier to play than my others and probably not great for technique. I remember Antonio Rey saying in a workshop how he always practices without a capo to make the hands work more. Slow and strong practice is always recommended but no need for a special guitar
Cheers
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Aug. 18 2018 21:28:25
 
zendalex

Posts: 28
Joined: Sep. 4 2010
From: New York area

RE: Concept of practice guitar (in reply to johnnefastis

Thanks for the comments guys!
I have 3 guitars at this point and I guess I am trying to justify my using all of them periodically. I also heard from my teacher the "no capo for practice" but I guess I am trying to bring this idea further to cover high action and longer scales.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Aug. 18 2018 22:41:16
 
Piwin

Posts: 2046
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: Concept of practice guitar (in reply to zendalex

No capo for technical exercises.
For pieces it's depends what's challenging in the piece.
Play Reflejo de Luna without a capo and there's a stretch in there (beginning of the tremolo) that's more difficult without a capo.
Play Guajiras de Lucia and it's easier without a capo since the piece goes up to the upper frets.
No need for another guitar though.
Speaking about muscles or stretches you wouldn't usually use, I've found quite a few of those just by exploring other genres of music. For instance, earlier this year I worked out Cacho Tirao's rendition of Parajo Campana. Right off the bat there's a section where you're holding down the B string with the middle finger and the low E string with the ring finger. That stretch just never comes up in flamenco so it was pretty challenging for me.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Aug. 18 2018 22:47:57
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1486
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: Concept of practice guitar (in reply to johnnefastis

quote:

I remember Antonio Rey saying in a workshop how he always practices without a capo to make the hands work more.


I remember seeing a technical article (although I can, unfortunately, no longer remember where) which said emphatically that practising without a capo pieces that you normally play with a capo is a very bad idea: the point of practice is to get muscular memory to the point where actions are precise, relaxed and automatic; and doing the same thing two different ways thoroughly negates this purpose.

Therefore, practise exactly — sitting position, everything — as you play, except for speed.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Aug. 19 2018 1:13:45
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