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Do not eat farmed salmon   You are logged in as Guest
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Morante

 

Posts: 1409
Joined: Nov. 21 2010
 

Do not eat farmed salmon 

https://elpais.com/elpais/2017/12/18/ciencia/1513609192_836658.html

I have worked with scientists on fish farms in the West of Ireland. As a result, I have, since then, only eaten wild fish. (Since the sea is now polluted; large predators such as tuna have mercury in their flesh, even this is a risk.)

Perhaps I am beginning to sound like Rupus
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 20 2017 16:07:01
 
Piwin

Posts: 2087
Joined: Feb. 9 2016
 

RE: Do not eat farmed salmon (in reply to Morante

And even if you're eating wild fish, chances are there are some questionable practices behind it.
Here it is summed up by David Guggenheim and the great Sturgeon General herself, Sylvia Earle:



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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 20 2017 16:31:49
 
rombsix

Posts: 6744
Joined: Jan. 11 2006
From: Beirut, Lebanon

RE: Do not eat farmed salmon (in reply to Piwin

Off-topic?

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Ramzi

http://www.youtube.com/rombsix
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 20 2017 17:15:54
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7497
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Do not eat farmed salmon (in reply to Morante

That's a shame, fish farming practice elsewhere has made great progress. There are also new books out about the updated methods of fish farming. It looks like it will be a major way that the oceans stocks of fish are rebuilt. Provided politicians can stick to some biologists guidelines.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 20 2017 23:02:26
 
Ruphus

Posts: 3689
Joined: Nov. 18 2010
 

RE: Do not eat farmed salmon (in reply to Morante

After a piece of swordfish in a central american restaurant I got a flash almost like of LSD (walking was like hovering) and found my whole skin red.

New farming seems to be offshore.

But I think solution would be scrapping trawlers with giant nets of over 50 km lenghts, and endless hook lines. Strict fishing limitation (unlike latest EU setting. -Albeit they at least agreed on international abstinence from arctic waters, with exception of local industries). Satellite observation of vessel traffic to detect dumping and absolute protocolling of waste oil. Online protocolling of catches (so that trawlers can´t dump whole ship loads of fish the minute they spot more valuable swarms). Instant halting of deforesting to prevent ocean death through algae under entry of erosion rivers and under lack of ocean predators.

If we don´t take hands off, artifical means can´t be lasting solution. Even just for matters of genetical diversity alone, let alone complexity of ecological system.

We need to retreat.
Which needs resonable community in the first place.
Which again can´t be had with given oligarchy and plutocracy.

We need to get rid of latent insane monarchy. Otherwise living space is to die.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 21 2017 9:02:57
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7497
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Do not eat farmed salmon (in reply to Morante

California stopped the salmon fishing season a few years in row abut 7 years ago. The fishermen bitterly complained, but the fish stocks rebounded. The fisherman have to learn to rotate into another catch in the off seasons. Species rotation is important too. People know very little about eating fish, it's ashame.
Some good news, on the Atlantic the menhaden schools are growing, this is promising because menhaden is the main food fish for all the apex species. Some bad news, Pacific Saury catches are down as Chinese markets make incursions into the North Pacific and compete with Japan, Korea and Russia and China is not cooperating with the 9 countries in the Saury fishing alliance to limit catches. Some people are not willing to face the facts that fish is a resource that needs catch limits.

I've heard fish farming in Spain is not as developed as it in in other countries, so maybe that's why el pais picks up on it. The problems of feeding fish antibiotics, leaving them stew in their own poop and other issues are being over come by technologies and new methods. Most of the young yellowtail, hamachi, that is being eaten in the US comes from farms in the water around Nagashima Japan, about 20 miles from me on the Amakusa Sea. It's good stuff.

Last year I was in CA for winter break, shopping for fish to cook for friends in a well known supermarket. The market is known for it's accuracy and myriad varieties of 'politically correct food' - I stood with my number at the fish counter and watched people order 'hamachi' that was not hamachi, because it was 'buri'. Yellowtail is yellowtail, but if you call it hamachi is has to be a certain size, under 18 to 20 inches after that it goes as buri. And there's large yellowtail subspecies called Hiramasa, you can't tell the difference unless you're an expert. And there's another Yellowtail called Kampachi, which get's confused with Hamachi. I stood at the counter and watched people buy Buri, that was being labeled as Hamachi. I elbowed my friend and explained what was going on, but I did not say anything. The fishmongers were wrapping and packing and when he got to me I said come down here and cut me some of this Yellow Fin tuna, I pointed at a lump of tuna in the case that was a big piece from near the top tail of what was a 200 pound fish. And the fish guy looked at me, and I said this one is better than that expensive tuna down there. He laughed, I said this one is fresher too. And then I said don't need you to cut it up for me. He knew I knew. And he probably knew the Hamachi was bigger yellowtail, but there's no such thing as buri in the US market. But the difference is distinct, the flesh of the fish changes with age. I often prefer buri over hamachi, it's fattier, sometimes almost too soft. Hamachi is 'mochi-mochi' firm but tender. There's a subtle difference. I never would have picked up on it save that I live in the heart of hamachi territory.

The price of the buri they sold as hamachi was startling to me, it was like $12.00 to $15 a pound- I can buy a whole Hamachi for under 12.00 and a full grown buri, for between 29 and 50 dollars, depending on the size. Yesterday I saw small hamachi for $8 bucks a fish. But why would buy 35 pounds of buri? I can get a strip to cut sashimi for five persons for under ten bucks.

There's several species of katsuo, bonita, my favorite is hagatsuo, katsuo with teeth. It's the most fantastic inexpensive sashimi fish, but until only recently have people outside Japan tried it on a big scale. It's still not fashionable to eat katsuo sashimi in the US, you can find it, but katsuo is only good for about 20 to 24 hours after you catch it, if and that's avbig if, it's treated right. After that, don't use it for sashimi. Lucky I can get it within hours of being docked.

My grandparents had a 32 foot outriggered Chriscraft in San Diego in the late 50's early 60's, they fished for yellowtail, albacore, marlin, tuna, etc. And they caught halibut and bass when that was not happening. My grandfather told me hours of deep sea fishing stories, runs to the Coronado Islands off Point Loma, I was never even out in that boat, it was sold about the time I was born, but the photos of the dock side displays of albacore and striped marlin fired my imagination about what lays under the sheets of water out there. I had the compass heading to the Coronado Islands memorized, I wanted to go out on that boat so bad, but have since forgotten. Last year when I visited California I stayed at Stewart Port's guitar shop, flopped on the couch for a month. Stew has an interesting name because he lives right in the port of Oakland. He's a Polish Jew, and he wrote out his guitar label to read 'El Polaco del Puerto' Stewart Port ...anyway, in the mornings I used to walk along the docks to get my coffee and passed a boat dealer that had an old 'Chris'. I always wonder when I see a 1950's Chris if it was the one my grandfather owned. They are now as rare now as Stew's great sense of humor.

My grandmother always dissed the mackerel as an annoying bait stealer that intercepted your live anchovy when you were trying to reach buri cruising under a school of mackerel. She really said bad things about the bonita, she said katsuo was the worst, it tasted horrible, smelled bad and was more annoying because you had to crank one in when they hit and unhook it and toss it back. She said you never keep bonita, it's trash fish that takes your carefully rigged flying fish when you troll for marlin. After a katsuo thrashes your marlin rigged flying fish you have to reel in your gear and play out another flying fish which was literally stitched onto a stout hook and wire leader.

That was pretty high falutin talk from the daughter of a family of roving Texas crop gatherers who picked cotton instead of going to very much elementary school. She was wrong, katsuo is lovely, but I suppose if you go from cotton picking to belonging to the Marlin Club at the Coronado Hotel you can hold such opinions. On katsuo however, I beg to differ.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 21 2017 12:36:44
 
Ruphus

Posts: 3689
Joined: Nov. 18 2010
 

RE: Do not eat farmed salmon (in reply to Morante

Saw a docu on Costa Rica´s management days ago.
Their pacific coast line is very rich of fish. They made protectorate of areas considered nursery of many species, and prohibited finning too (I sure hope that they got a hold of suppliers to Chinese pick up vessels). Unfortunately, catching whole sharks is allowed still, though.

All in all their attempts to preservation is exemplary. And it all reminds how impressed I am of that country and its people.

What a miserable irony to think of where I ended up instead. Funny even how earthquakes and vulcano eruptions were my only concerns while looking for a lot there.


Regarding prices of hardly ever fresh fish (other than trout that will be killed on order. -By letting it suffocate. grrrr ) Trout and small barracuda range close to 20 bucks per kilo here (with the trash on you).
The sort of small tuna provided here is about inedible. It is an incredible tank consisting almost entirely of bone harness. They catch other sorts too, however seem to deliver them exclusively in cans. Standard size of shallow can that costs you around 8 bucks and more per piece. (Keep in mind that average income here being somewhere between 500 and 800 bucks monthly.)

As I heard as of late, over 90% percent of the population have dropped into impoverishment. Due to blood sucking junta that is boundlessly squeezing off the country. Their top ranks outperform the officially richest in the world, but are never listed by Forbes.

If you see a guy from here playing lofty buyer abroad, please spit him in the face.
You will hardly be hitting the wrong guy.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Dec. 21 2017 14:12:21
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