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MikeC

Posts: 79
Joined: Mar. 19 2015
From: Panama (living in South Florida)

Have you read any good books lately? 

I'm going to be traveling next week and I usually use the time in planes, airports, hotels, etc reading.

I was going to search for some books to read but, with all the smart people here, I figured I should ask here first.

It doesn't have to be flamenco or music related. Maybe we can make it an "interesting books thread"

I appreciate your input.

Thanks

Mike
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 2 2015 15:23:51
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1611
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

Too broad a question. What kind of books do you like? Adventure? Science Fiction? History? Historical fiction?

And what kind do you not like?

Please be more specific.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 2 2015 15:30:56
 
Escribano

Posts: 5922
Joined: Jul. 6 2003
From: England

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

Science, non-fiction, true crime, biographies?

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 2 2015 15:40:24
 
MikeC

Posts: 79
Joined: Mar. 19 2015
From: Panama (living in South Florida)

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

I'm open to suggestions, but here:

Likes: History/history fiction, biographies, science, music/music history, novels (adventure/mystery/sci-fi)

Not too interested in: politics, religion, "self help", romantic novels
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 2 2015 15:45:14
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1611
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

My approximate top ten Science Fiction:

Excession
Tiger, Tiger (aka The Stars My Destination)
The Fury Out Of Time
The City and the Stars
City of Diamond
Don’t Bite The Sun (and Drinking Sapphire Wine, sequel)
Altered Carbon (and sequels)
Chasm City (and sequels)
Norstrilia
Galactic Patrol (and sequels)

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 2 2015 15:47:54
 
Escribano

Posts: 5922
Joined: Jul. 6 2003
From: England

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

"Genius: Richard Feynman and Modern Physics" - James Gleick

This book changed my life in a good way.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 2 2015 15:52:33
 
TGerman

 

Posts: 119
Joined: Nov. 27 2005
 

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

Well, one of the best books I have read in a very long time is The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. I actually read it 3 times in 6 months! I am not into the fantasy genre at all but I had heard a lot about it and read the reviews on Goodreads (goodreads - Name of the Wind review) I decided to give it a try. It hooked me. And so did its follow-up Wise Man's Fear. Everyone is anxiously waiting for the final book in the trilogy. Just 2 days it was announced that Lionsgate has just optioned the rights to make a TV series, a movie AND a video game! NOTW optioned. I have bought this book for 10 different people and they all feel the same way.

Other than that, one of my all time favorites is The Count of Monte Cristo, can never go wrong with that book.

Boys in the Boat tell the story of the 1936 Olympic rowing team. You don't have to like sports at all to really enjoy this book.

Catch-22 if you want to laugh out loud. It's an oldie but a goodie.

I'll come back to this shortly.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 2 2015 15:53:59
 
edguerin

Posts: 1518
Joined: Dec. 24 2007
From: Siegburg, Alemania

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

Musicophilia by Oliver Sacks

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El aficionado solitario
Alemania
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 2 2015 15:59:37
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1611
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

My approximate top ten Biography:

David Attenborough: Life on Air
William Manchester: The Last Lion (Churchill)
George Martin: All You Need Is Ears
Linda Ronstadt: Simple Dreams
Sting: Broken Music
Nancy Wake: The White Mouse
Richard Feynman: “Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman!”
Laurie Lee: As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning
David Niven: The Moon’s a Balloon
Frank McCourt: Angela’s Ashes

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 2 2015 16:12:22
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1611
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to TGerman

quote:

one of my all time favorites is The Count of Monte Cristo, can never go wrong with that book.


Unfortunately you can, because the English translations were bowdlerised by the Victorians (see the Wikipedia article). Apparently the most accurate translation is the new Penguin Classics one by Robin Buss.

But:

The Beeb has now (after 50 years!) released on DVD the wonderful 1964 version with Alan Badel, which is quite stunning and is also (I’m told) the version most faithful to the original.

(I saw it when it was first broadcast, and the wait was like a toothache.)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Count-Monte-Cristo-Complete-DVD/dp/B00JQK2SKK/ref=sr_1_1?s=dvd&ie=UTF8&qid=1443802913&sr=1-1&keywords=alan+badel+count+of+monte+cristo

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 2 2015 16:24:44
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1611
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

My approximate top ten Historical Fiction:

The Game of Kings
The Iron King
The Marquise of the Angels
Ross Poldark
The Paladin
Master and Commander
The First Man in Rome
The Blue Max
Shogun
The Saracen Blade

All but the last two have sequels; most are the first books in series.

By far my favourite is the first, which is the start of Dorothy Dunnett’s tour de force
Lymond series.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 2 2015 17:02:57
 
MikeC

Posts: 79
Joined: Mar. 19 2015
From: Panama (living in South Florida)

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

Thanks all! Thanks for taking the time to do this!

I'm going to go through this list and save this thread for future reference.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 2 2015 17:46:53
 
runner

 

Posts: 350
Joined: Dec. 5 2008
From: New Jersey USA

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

A few recent good reads:

The Secret History of Wonder Woman, by Jill Lepore. Fantastic account of the creation of Wonder Woman comics.
The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack, by Ian Tattersall. Excellent review of the hominid fossil record.
The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, by Oliver Sacks. Sympathetic tales of strangely afflicted people Sacks treated. Older book, but Sacks' recent death triggered my reading it.
Recent autobiographies of Richard Dawkins and Stephen Hawking; also Oliver Sacks (don't remember the titles).

After one reads Master and Commander by Patrick O'Brian, you will be sorely tempted to read at least the next dozen books in the series. Yield to that temptation.

West With the Night, by Beryl Markham. An amazing woman.

Some books to take to the desert island:

Moby Dick
Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson
The Joys of Yiddish, by Leo Rosten
The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion
The Civilization of Rome, by Donald R. Dudley
The Journals of Lewis and Clark, edited by Bernard DeVoto

So many good books........

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 2 2015 19:15:05
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 2852
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

Whether on the road or sitting at home by the fireplace, I highly recommend the "Flashman" series by George McDonald Fraser. It is a series of 12 books that follow the career of Harry Flashman, a fictional character who takes part in various 19th century British imperial adventures, as well as a couple in America. Flashman is a cad, a bounder, and a poltroon, who in his attempts to avoid battle and conflict always ends up appearing to be a hero. It is a riot to read these books, and what is best is that Fraser has his history dead on right.

The series begins with the novel entitled "Flashman," and it superimposes flashman on the British debacle in Afghanistan in 1842, when they retreated from Kabul and all but one were killed as they made their way through the passes in winter and were picked off by the Afghans. The one lone survivor who made his way to the British fort at Jalalabad was an army surgeon named William Brydon. All of the historical events are accurately portrayed, but Flashman, of course, is the one element that is added, and he ends up surviving along with Brydon. The series continues with Flashman appearing in the Sikh War; alongside James Brooke, the "White Rajah" of Sarawak; and even in America at "Custer's Last Stand" in 1876, where he, naturally, survives the massacre of Custer's 7th Cavalry at the Little Big Horn.

There are so many good histories and biographies out there that it is hard to pick one. Nevertheless, I recommend William Manchester's magisterial three-volume biography of Winston Churchill entitled "The Last Lion." Manchester had a stroke and passed away before finishing the final volume, but he picked Paul Reid to complete it using his notes. In my opinion, Churchill should have been Time Magazine's "Man of the Century" in 2000, although I have no problem with Einstein as the pick. Manchester's is the finest of the many Churchill biographies.

Another interesting biography is "Cicero: The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Politician," by Anthony Everitt. Cicero was not only Rome's greatest politician, he was it's greatest orator as well.

If you want to learn a lot of good history while having a rollicking good read following Flashman's adventures, the Flashman series is for you. If you have an interest in Churchill, Manchester's biography tops the list. And the Everitt biography of Cicero is first-rate.

Bill

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And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 3 2015 0:32:25
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1611
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to BarkellWH

I agree with you entirely about The Last Lion, which (you may or may not have noticed) was in my own top ten list of biographies. Among other things, Manchester sets the record straight about Gallipoli; but the salient point is that he’s simply the best writer of all Churchill’s biographers, by far.

In fact, after I finished that, I searched out everything of his I could find. Standing out particularly in my memory are the story of the great munitions empire, The Arms of Krupp; and a largely autobiographical account of the War in the Pacific, Goodbye, Darkness, which is one of the most harrowing books I’ve ever read.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 3 2015 3:31:39
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7518
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

'The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet'

By David Mitchell. Long, will last at three or four afternoons at a hotel laying in bed drinking coco-locos.

'From Heaven Lake' by Vikram Seth is pretty a good road book. Good air plane book, takes your mind off the butt numbing seat, or at least Seth sympathizes with you as he hitches rides aboard Chinese trucks from Beijing to India via the Western Desert and though Tibet.

If you ever have insomnia or jet lag while you travel be sure to pack Leonard Meyers' seminal snooze festival called "Music, the Arts, and Ideas".

A couple pages in and you'll easily be able to nod off on a plane or hard airport terminal bench and get a nap before your next boarding call.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 3 2015 8:42:36
 
runner

 

Posts: 350
Joined: Dec. 5 2008
From: New Jersey USA

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

Estebanana and I find ourselves in complete agreement in our assessment of Leonard Meyer's difficult book on 20th century trends in music and the arts, Music, the Arts, and Ideas-- it is definitely not a book to read in airports, etc. The book requires three things (at least) often in short supply in many readers: a degree of pre-existing familiarity with the book's topics, an ability to follow the author's detailed arguments, and an open and receptive mind. Lacking any of these qualities, some readers fall into somnolence, or, worse yet, lash out at the book or its author or its enthusiasts with spasms of resentful bombast rather than respectful, civil expressions of disagreement; Stephen and I find that sort of behavior inexcusable.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 3 2015 14:31:25
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7518
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to runner

quote:

Estebanana and I find ourselves in complete agreement in our assessment of Leonard Meyer's difficult book on 20th century trends in music and the arts, Music, the Arts, and Ideas-- it is definitely not a book to read in airports, etc. The book requires three things (at least) often in short supply in many readers: a degree of pre-existing familiarity with the book's topics, an ability to follow the author's detailed arguments, and an open and receptive mind. Lacking any of these qualities, some readers fall into somnolence, or, worse yet, lash out at the book or its author or its enthusiasts with spasms of resentful bombast rather than respectful, civil expressions of disagreement; Stephen and I find that sort of behavior inexcusable.




Nobody teaches this book because it's marginal. In six years of college course work in the arts I've never seen this book on a syllabus. None of my professor friends are or ever have been teaching this book, I've never seen this book in an anthology. I don't currently know nor have I ever met a professor who even mentioned this book. This book is not taught, because it's a mess.

And I find it funny as hell you flaunt such a lemon. If you really want to read something good about music, Stravinsky's and or Copland's Harvard lectures are far better. Copland talks about how to listen to music and Stravinsky talks about interpretation. I would take those on a trip if I wanted to read something "theoretical".

One of my friends heads the Spanish dept. a major university, she teaches some of the philosophy classes that use Iberian texts. It's funny how she refers to Ortega Y Gasset. She says 'Ortega Und Gasset', then clicks her heels like an SS officer. Then she laughs and teaches the class. Ortega y Gasset is kind of narrow, comes off as dictatorial, so she takes the piss out. She knows the material cold; A pro does not have to have breathless reverence for a text they find problematic.

It's far better to find problems and question a text, than to just read and accept everything. It's not an essential book, in my book. It's about three times as long as it needs to be and it reads like a telephone book.

One of the things I dislike about this book in particular is the constant reference-name dropping that is only clever, but becomes a cloying waste of my time. I don't need to read a book like this to make me feel smart because get the references. I get the feeling he is showing off the breadth of this knowledge at the expense of making the book much, much longer than it needs to be to make his point. It's fine to be smart and be able to drop references, but there a difference between making a book work and flattering the reader for getting though a mine field g gratuitous reference making name dropping. This kind of academic game is boring, even perhaps 15% of what he talks about resonates, they rest is filler I don't need.

Do I care what anyone thinks of how and why I read? How I judge a book, how determine what reading I need to do? Hell no. Not one bit.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 3 2015 16:13:00
 
runner

 

Posts: 350
Joined: Dec. 5 2008
From: New Jersey USA

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to estebanana

You've helped make my point.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 3 2015 17:47:56
 
Brendan

Posts: 172
Joined: Oct. 30 2010
 

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

I enjoyed Musicking: The Meanings of Performing and Listening by Christopher Small. I don't buy his argument all through (when does one ever?) but it's thought-provoking. It's focussed on classical music (or orchestral music, or academic art music in the European tradition, or whatever we're calling that stuff). He has some very good material on the oddness of the classical music concert.

One sentence in particular stayed with me: "I cannot remember seeing a concert hall built in the Gothic style" (p. 22). He hazards an explanation for this, but first: is it true? I can't think of many counterexamples.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 3 2015 18:19:44
 
runner

 

Posts: 350
Joined: Dec. 5 2008
From: New Jersey USA

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to Brendan

Gothic as in Gothic cathedral? Long, narrow, very high vaulted ceiling? Can't think of one. Probably not good acoustics for a large audience who expect at least a semi-equal musical experience.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 3 2015 18:54:06
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7518
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to runner

I've always enjoyed the books by this guy Arturo Perez-Reverte and the Sevilla Communion is of course set in Sevilla. It's a murder mystery set in Sevilla so he takes you through famous buildings you recognize if you have been to Sevilla. Fun stuff. A cut above airport book like Da Vinci Code, but still a page turner good for travel.
http://www.amazon.com/The-Seville-Communion-Arturo-Perez-Reverte/dp/0156029812

I also got to thinking 'Iberia' by James Michener is a pretty good road book. A book from the 1950's? early 60's and not one talked about much today. But it's a travel book and if you live in Spain probably not that exciting, but as a travel book it's a very nice piece of work, it has a pace that corresponds to travel. I think even if you know a lot about Spain and have in interest in Spanish subject matter that it is one you should at least glance at. I think this one os underrated mostly because it's not 'cool' any longer, but he places valuable nuggets of history in context as he moves from place to place.

I mention that one because it's also long enough to last for a fairly long air travel trip and if you forget it on the plane or leave it in a hotel it's not as big deal. You can get another one. Used book stores usually have a copy for under 5 bucks.








quote:

You've helped make my point.

____________


When you recommended this book I thought, oh something that slipped though the cracks, a lost gem perhaps? What I found was a turgid, bad reading, overdetermined academic slog through a bunch of pat myself on the back references and one fairly off kilter main idea that could have been explained in 20- 30 pages or less.

If he would have worked on it for a few more months it would be big enough to make into door stop. As it stands now it occupies that awkward space between book and doorstop.

I have friends that have slogged through 'Infinite Jest' because they felt that had to be a good literary citizen. Oh, I don't know about 100 pages and you get the idea. DFW also needed an editor to sit on him.

Just because a book goes on and on does not means it's good.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 4 2015 0:00:56
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7518
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to BarkellWH

quote:

There are so many good histories and biographies out there that it is hard to pick one. Nevertheless, I recommend William Manchester's magisterial three-volume biography of Winston Churchill entitled "The Last Lion." Manchester had a stroke and passed away before finishing the final volume, but he picked Paul Reid to complete it using his notes. In my opinion, Churchill should have been Time Magazine's "Man of the Century" in 2000, although I have no problem with Einstein as the pick. Manchester's is the finest of the many Churchill biographies.


How does the bio by Boris Johnson stack up to the three by Manchester and Reid? Are you familiar with that one?

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 4 2015 0:31:08
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 2852
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to estebanana

quote:

How does the bio by Boris Johnson stack up to the three by Manchester and Reid? Are you familiar with that one?


Yes, and it does not come close to Manchester's magisterial biography. Johnson is a British politician who is both Mayor of London and a Member of Parliament, and his biography of Churchill, entitled "The Churchill Factor: How One Man Made History," frankly, is glib and lacks a historian's depth. What's worse, it is apparent that Johnson compares himself favorably to Churchill, and that he wrote the book as more a political tract than a biography.

What makes Manchester's triple-decker such a magnificent work is not only the research that went into it, but the quality of his writing. Manchester's writing is exquisitely beautiful and a joy to read.

One of the best books about Churchill is John Lukac's, "Five Days in London: May 1940." It is not a biography; rather, it focuses on how Churchill prevailed in the debate within his War Cabinet over the question of whether to negotiate with Hitler or to continue the war. Churchill had been Prime Minister only since May 10, and the debate at 10 Downing that took place May 24-28, was one of those events that can legitimately be described as a "hinge of history."

Things were going badly on the Continent, and thousands of British soldiers were bottled up at Dunkirk. There were those like Lord Halifax who wanted to reach out to Mussolini to try and strike a deal with Hitler. Churchill was having none of it, and that crucial debate, in which Churchill prevailed, set the course of the war and probably saved Western Civilization. I highly recommend Lukacs' book. It is one of those works that reminds one of just how crucial Churchill's leadership was for the conduct of the war, both for the UK and for the Allies.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 4 2015 1:30:52
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7518
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to BarkellWH

quote:

Yes, and it does not come close to Manchester's magisterial biography. Johnson is a British politician who is both Mayor of London and a Member of Parliament, and his biography of Churchill, entitled "The Churchill Factor: How One Man Made History," frankly, is glib and lacks a historian's depth. What's worse, it is apparent that Johnson compares himself favorably to Churchill, and that he wrote the book as more a political tract than a biography.


I heard him, Boris Johnson, speak on the radio in an interview, he was amusing to say the least. And I did pick up on his self comparison to Churchhill.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 4 2015 1:44:24
 
edguerin

Posts: 1518
Joined: Dec. 24 2007
From: Siegburg, Alemania

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

I recently re-discovered Saki (H.H. Munro). Wonderfully ironic/sarcastic short stories.

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El aficionado solitario
Alemania
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 4 2015 8:36:30
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 2852
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to edguerin

quote:

I recently re-discovered Saki (H.H. Munro). Wonderfully ironic/sarcastic short stories.


"The Open Window," by Saki, is a classic. Another fine author of short stories is Somerset Maugham. Maugham wrote some very entertaining short stories, with British Malaya, the Pacific Islands, and other exotic locales as backdrops, from the 1920s through the 1940s, and they still hold up very well today. They usually, but not always, concern British expatriates and often have a surprising twist at the end. Three that are especially good are "Rain," "The Letter," and "The Outstation." But, frankly, they are all good.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 4 2015 9:02:58
 
estebanana

 

Posts: 7518
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

I read Maugham in my twenties, glad to hear you think he holds up. He's damned good right? I expect he'll continue to deliver for a long time. I might get something of his to read now that this reminds me. I can't go to the library so all my books are those dreaded Kindle things.

Remember also Graham Greene. And another Graham from the same time and group of people, Graham Sutherland. He painted a portrait of Maugham that looks like it could bite you.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 4 2015 13:18:15
 
Paul Magnussen

Posts: 1611
Joined: Nov. 8 2010
From: London (living in the Bay Area)

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to runner

quote:

it is definitely not a book to read in airports


Getting back to airports, then: for a good thriller, it’s hard to beat the Modesty Blaise books, particularly the first two.

(Too bad the film sucked.)

And I’ve always had a soft spot for Leslie Charteris’s Saint stories — especially the early ones (which are really historical novels now, set as they are in the ’30s).

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 4 2015 16:17:43
 
mark indigo

 

Posts: 2683
Joined: Dec. 5 2007
From: UK

RE: Have you read any good books lately? (in reply to MikeC

quote:

I'm going to be traveling next week and I usually use the time in planes, airports, hotels, etc reading.


"A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again" by David Foster Wallace - perfect for your trip!

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 4 2015 17:04:29
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