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Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

Asian Seafood 

I decided to start this thread to talk about Asian seafood as opposed to derailing the top baking thread.

Makes sense about the different fish being treated differently. I wouldn't treat every cut of meat the same.

Poke's pretty good, different than the carpaccio style sashimi but maybe kind of like the bastard child of the poke and traditional sashimi. We have entire restaurants/stands in Venice devoated to just Poke, it's gotten really popular in the beach cities lately.

I'm headed to eat Korean sashimi this weekend, pretty excited. Don't know much about it other than I get to eat a live octopus! Should be a cool experience! The person taking me says its like Japanese sashimi with Korean sauces on it, if that's the case I'm sure I'll be an instant addict.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 28 2015 0:15:51
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3247
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

In Palau they have "blackened sashimi," which is the regular, raw, thin-sliced fish but with the surrounding edge sauteed, sort of pan-seared. It is absolutely delicious. The surrounding sauteed edge really adds to the flavor.

And in Koror, the capital of Palau, the finest blackened sashimi is without question found at a local restaurant and watering hole called Kramer's. Kramer's is owned by Rene, a German with wide-ranging interests and an in-house library, and his Filipina wife Jane. They are a colorful pair, and the food, drink, and camaraderie at Kramer's is without equal in Palau. And the blackened sashimi is to die for.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 28 2015 0:40:37
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3131
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

Good idea. I was beginning to feel a little guilty.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 28 2015 0:40:49
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

Ah yeah! Blackened sashimi! I've seen it two ways, one was kind of crusted with black sesame seeds, scorched then sliced thin. The other was at a fusion place and it had more of like a Cajun rub, scorched and then sliced thin. Good stuff!

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 28 2015 1:28:53
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3247
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

quote:

Ah yeah! Blackened sashimi! I've seen it two ways, one was kind of crusted with black sesame seeds, scorched then sliced thin.


That's the way they prepare blackened sashimi in Palau, if what you mean by "scorched" is the edge of the sliceed sashimi is sauteed with black sesame seeds imbedded into it.

I have grown to like blackened sashimi more than the regular sashimi which, though the regular sashimi is very good, can be ordered at a hundred sushi bars and restaurants in any major city. Blackened sashimi, now there you have a rare treat.

One thing I dislike intensely is the trend toward Asian "fusion" food. I don't like the corruption that occurs by turning perfectly good and delicious Asian dishes into a mess of "fusion," both with other Asian dishes and (and I have seen this!) by "fusing" it with other ethnic dishes entirely, such as Mexican and Salvadoran. you end up diluting the best parts of the various dishes and turning the whole mess into a mediocre experience. Much like flamenco "fusion" with pop and bass guitars.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 29 2015 1:59:12
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

I would mostly agree with that. Korean tacos have become wildly popular down here. Korean and Mexican are my two favorites but together, I just can't stand it. Had it many times in the hopes that somewhere is gunna figure out how to do it right but it's just never good.
I thought Korean sashimi was fusion but evidently it's been a thing in some parts of Korea for over a hundred years. They've got their own way of cutting and everything.

One not so exotic fusion I can get behind, tex-mex it's my guilty pleasure for sure.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 29 2015 3:12:21
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

Personally I feel no guilt at derailing most guitar making threads, unless someone is showing their hard work, then it's rude. Otherwise I kind of like the banter in and out of topic.

The Korean eating of the live octopus thing....Uhhg, gross. I think that is disgusting. Taco needs to be cooked, raw taco tastes like hell and is too tough to be considered edible. The Koreans are nuts for eating live squid and octopus. My opinion on Korean food is this: Leave seafood to the Japanese, the Chinese and Koreans don't understand it, but leave beef to the Koreans because the Japanese will never get it. Chinese food puts me to sleep mostly, except Northern style. They murder fish under the worst sauces.

There, I said it.

And like Bill I'm mostly anti-fusion, one beautiful fusion that should be left as is, Vietnamese food. Tamper with tacos? Yuck. Tacos are tacos. You stand and eat them as they are made, fancy yuppified culturally blended tacos should be banned like the plague. And my old beef is with this crap called "wraps" WTF is is? It's called a Burrito, all the vegan nature mommas and food fussing Portlanderos need to deal with this. Do not "F" with the burrito, which by itself is a fine and perfect Baudlerization of Mexican food. Anyone who calls a burrito a wrap should be flogged before the mast until sundown and sent under the decks without so much as a live octo tentacle to chew on.

Fusion, *bah patewy*.

________

Now that I have vented my spleen about live taco eating and the vile habit of fusing food.

Blackened sashimi- In Japan that is called Tataki.


You either dip one side of the fish in boiling water or you sear it. Or you buy a whole katsuo flank that has been seared all around on the outside. Then you slice it into medallions, like beef medallions. The basic way is to slice garlic, onions, and use sliced oba leaf or shiso leaf....sort of the 'cilantro' of Japan, tastes different used much the same way. Put it in a shallow dish or big plate, pour ponzu sauce over it and then drop the katsuo medallions over it a tap them down into the ponzu. Then a few drops on ponzu on top and throw a few sliced onions on the top.

It's called tataki because tataki means to 'tamp down'. Eat some and then play Poke'mon.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 29 2015 4:10:01
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

quote:

Vietnamese food


It's a beautiful thing. I'm lucky enough to get home cooked Vietnamese nearly every weekend at my lady's parents house. For my birthday the other day they got me those fertilized duck eggs(hot vit lon) it's become my birthday tradition now lol. Anyhow, now I keep fish sauce in the house and have upped my capsaicin tolerance 10 fold. Pho is only the beginning, Vietnamese food is a whole world of amazing stuff that unlike other Asian food, thanks to the French, incorporates bread, dairy, and pate pretty seamlessly and with addicting results.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 29 2015 4:37:04
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

quote:

It's a beautiful thing. I'm lucky enough to get home cooked Vietnamese nearly every weekend at my lady's parents house. For my birthday the other day they got me those fertilized duck eggs(hot vit lon) it's become my birthday tradition now lol. Anyhow, now I keep fish sauce in the house and have upped my capsaicin tolerance 10 fold. Pho is only the beginning, Vietnamese food is a whole world of amazing stuff that unlike other Asian food, thanks to the French, incorporates bread, dairy, and pate pretty seamlessly and with addicting results.


Indeed, and fish sauce is great for making scrambled eggs with chopped green onion too.

My girl friend in college was Vietnamese, she turned me into a Vietnamese food whore.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 29 2015 14:40:25
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

quote:



Indeed, and fish sauce is great for making scrambled eggs with chopped green onion too.



Best ever!

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 29 2015 18:07:41
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3247
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to estebanana

quote:

Tamper with tacos? Yuck. Tacos are tacos. You stand and eat them as they are made, fancy yuppified culturally blended tacos should be banned like the plague. And my old beef is with this crap called "wraps" WTF is is? It's called a Burrito, all the vegan nature mommas and food fussing Portlanderos need to deal with this. Do not "F" with the burrito, which by itself is a fine and perfect Baudlerization of Mexican food. Anyone who calls a burrito a wrap should be flogged before the mast until sundown and sent under the decks without so much as a live octo tentacle to chew on. Fusion, *bah patewy*.


Couldn't agree more, Stephen. Yuppified "culturally-blended" tacos and so-called "wraps" should be relegated to history's unfortunate aberrations, much like bleeding with leaches in medicine and an Earth-centered universe. And those who continue to flaunt such bastardized culinary horrors should not only be flogged before the mast with a cat-o'-nine-tails, they should immediately thereafter be keel-hauled as well. "Wraps" indeed! And I won't even get into "taco salad."

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 29 2015 18:36:19
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3247
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to BarkellWH

One additional thought on "fusion." With the exception of a thermonuclear (hydrogen) bomb, when one prattles on about "fusion," whether referring to Asian or any other combination of foods, or whether referring to music (flamenco or otherwise), or for that matter when referring to most other endeavors, "fusion" usually ends up with the whole being less than the sum of its parts.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 29 2015 20:43:33
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3131
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to estebanana

quote:

ORIGINAL: estebanana

Tamper with tacos? Yuck. Tacos are tacos. You stand and eat them as they are made, fancy yuppified culturally blended tacos should be banned like the plague. And my old beef is with this crap called "wraps" WTF is is?

Fusion, *bah patewy*.

________


Friday was my last night in Venice, Larisa stayed another week and a half to go camping in Croatia and to visit friends in the deep south. Larisa said, "Let's try some place new for dinner."

We ate at a touristy sidewalk place a couple of blocks from the Piazza San Marco. On the menu were "piadene". I asked "Che cosa e una piadena?" The waiter did not attempt to explain.

(Larisa speaks fluent Italian. When complimented on my Italian, I say, "I don't speak Italian. I just pronounce it.")

The waiter disappeared for quite a while, then returned with a plate. On it was something that looked more or less like a whole wheat tortilla. We immediately deduced it would be employed in some sort of "wrap". He didn't even pause to hear our reaction, just took it away.

The food we ordered was excellent. We never had a meal during six weeks in Italy that was anything less than good. We had quite a few that were really excellent, including some great wines I haven't seen in the shops here in Austin.

Haven't made it back to my favorite taqueria yet, for tacos al pastor and tacos de barbacoa, with a selection of home made salsas, or to Mi Ranchito for puerco en salsa verde.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 29 2015 20:52:32
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

I don't want to get into complaining too much, but I have not had Mexican food in a few years. One young woman here has tried to make tacos and they are ok, ( well actually not really tacos) but they are ground beef with store bought "taco spices" and tomato sauce. And ...well tortillas do not exist here. A friend in Nagoya treated me to tacos he made, but he really splurged on the beans.

There will probably never be Mexican food in Japan either because they just don't have a taste for it. For me this is really difficult because I grew up with tortilla and beans and hand made tortillas. That has always been the food that grounds me and when I first came here it took more than year before I stopped tasting tacos and smelling them as olfactory hallucinations as part of culture shock. This is real, would have thought if someone told me this they would be a crack pot, but it really happens.

I had some mediocre Indian food about a year ago, but I tried to forget it fast because it was in Kyoto and I'll probably never go back there. I called it "Kyoto Disney" because it was so touristy.

People advise me to cook my own food and make the dishes I want from there countries, but the problem is that you can't get the basic ingredients for any other than Japanese food. There is place in Tokyo called Ali Shan and American hippy run mail order vegan food supplier and they sell corn meal in small bags, I though about making tortillas, but the price of cornmeal is ridiculously high. Pinto beans and and cornmeal are high priced luxury items.

Anyone for a can of refried beans at $4.50 to $7.00 a can?
Never thought I'd see that.

I found some cans of jalepenos for $2.00 I mixed it with sliced carrots and onion in a big jar with some rice vinegar and touch of sugar and ate that on eggs. The cultural diversity of non diluted native foods to be found in the US markets and restaurants is some thing to behold. If you like food and can't travel often the US is the place to be.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 0:20:15
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

Oh my, no Mexican, that is a real shame...... I grew up in the same neighborhood as Ritchie Vallens and George Lopez so I can certainly share your sentiment. Cabeza burritos have been a staple of my diet since childhood lol.
What's the logistics of sending you a care package?? Will they confiscate food items???

Looks like I can send most things except meat and produce.......
Too bad about produce....I've been growing some jalapeños, serranos, and poblanos.....maybe vacuum packed?

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 0:29:53
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3131
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

My college room mate and good friend has lived in Munich since 1964, except for a brief return to Texas many years ago. For several years he was an engineering vice president of Cyanamid International, with his office in Rotterdam. He was responsible for non-metallic materials for the aircraft industry, and branched out into a number of other industries.

The headquarters of Cyanamid International were (may still be) in Havre de Grace, Maryland. Tom jetted back and forth across the Atlantic via the supersonic Concorde. He always flew with two suitcases. Heading west it was empty. Heading east it was filled with Mexican food ingredients, shipped to Maryland from Texas or Mexico.

Once a year he would spend 30 days in the USA, at least a week or two with my family--usually on a trip to Mexico.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 1:36:25
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

REAL mexican food is amazing, unique, and complex. Regional ingredients turn it into a whole world of food.
It's a shame people think it's deep fried and drenched in cheese and ground meat. Don't get me wrong some times I love a good chimichanga but not when I'm in the mood for mexican food. Real mexican is actually fairly healthy.
Made an attempt at cochinita pibil the other day in the pressure cooker, came out okay but next time I'll use the smoker. MmmMMMmMm

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 1:46:57
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3131
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to estebanana

quote:

ORIGINAL: estebanana

I called it "Kyoto Disney" because it was so touristy.



Larisa and I were in Kyoto eight years ago, in September. There were tourists at the Emperor's and Shogun's palaces, and a few other places, but I remember eating in quite a few places where we were the only tourists--non-Japanese tourists at least. One of them was a really spiffy sushi bar. We went to the hot springs north of town, and were the only non-Japanese tourists there. Of course there were tourists at Gion Corner, but only maybe a quarter were non-Japanese. We did see a sign in English in the window of a nearby restaurant "Cheapest steak $100--no exceptions!"

But many of my favorite sites from the '60s and '70s are now utterly trampled. When I first went to Laos and Cambodia there were very few tourists, but now there are square miles of "modern" hotels and giant tourist busses packing the roads.

Rome is big enough to more or less handle the onslaught, though we didn't do the Vatican Museum or the Coliseum. Florence and Venice are just overrun by the crowds, though you can still avoid them if you know where to go. Capri is OK if you go over the mountain to Anacapri. Though we enjoyed Florence, and dined every evening in the Piazza della Signoria, it was a relief to spend a couple of days in Pisa, where the tourists are mostly day trippers, and confine themselves to the vicinity of the leaning tower. Only a few blocks away we had a nice dinner where we seemed to be the only non-locals.

Not that the tourists were particularly offensive--even some of the ethnic groups known for bad manners seem to have improved, at least in Italy. It was just the crowds.

Italians in the travel business remain almost unfailingly polite and genuinely helpful, but it was so refreshing to spend time with Larisa's friends in smaller towns and in the mountains, enjoying true hospitality, friendship and Italian warmth.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 2:01:55
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

quote:

What's the logistics of sending you a care package?? Will they confiscate food items???


The only economical way to get stuff here is to bring it in a suitcase. If you tried to send something the cost would be about $10.00 shipping for can of beans. Or very near. Your offer is kind and thoughtful and appreciated. How about someday I come to Venice and we soak our faces in some hoppy microbrew beer and ride bikes from taco truck to taco truck?

I've just decided to forget about Mexican food because if you make it you have to make a lot at one time and Yuko's family won't eat it. Or they will try to eat it and be miserable although act kind about it so I don't feel bad. Either way it's more work and guilt that I can take. See that is the part of living here that is difficult. Sharing what you know and where you are from is just really impractical. Japanese tend to want to experience the world off island, but they have to reinvent it to suit them. Unless they have spent time in another country they tend to color and flavor foreign food as if it were Japanese. Part of this is ingredients availability and part cultural insulation. It's the part of this culture that get misunderstood as not accepting outside ideas or in the worst cases racist. It's not like that at all, Japanese are very open, the problem is it's an island and the supply line coming in is limited which makes creating certain foods very difficult.

Italian is pretty easy here, except cheese. Real cheese is rare, but then real good cheese expensive in the US too. Italian food that has seafood or fresh vegetables is fairly doable. Pasta is Asian after all.

There is good pork here so I have been contemplating carnitas, but without black beans and I guess on white bread with rice. I've been told several times I can get all the Mexican stuff at a US military base, but the problem is I'm not in the mili so I can't get it.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 5:07:36
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

Naw man, imma make it happen, the longest I've ever been out of the country is 3 weeks and that was in Spain and I can't tell you how bad I was jonesin for a burrito. You need a little piece of Cali and as a proud Californian I've gotta make it happen. I'll PM you.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 5:20:21
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

Well Len, wait till you see the sticker price of sending stuff. We'll talk via PM. You should just come visit with a suit case full of tortillas, it would be cheaper. No hotel charges, airport pick up, fishing trip included, NOMI HODAI for you! (free drinking)

Now on with seafood. I mentioned once before that there is a good fish in So. CA waters called an Opaleye, it's the same fish as a Kuro Snapper here, or in local dialect Megina.

That one, Opaleye, makes really good blackened sashimi, or the way they do it locally is the boiling water dip on the skin side. If you can find that one or catch it worth the trouble. Also good as just regular sashimi.

______

Now I feel bad about the beef comments. I have one friend here who speaks Spanish, he lived in the Dominican Republic for a year. We use Spanish as code, like Navajo code talkers. ( I know that sounds way off base and not historically aware.) We plan trips to the bar in front of the wifies and they are not able to follow as we plot to go off the reservation. ( Oh the terrible puns are killing me.)

Anyway, he knows how to grill beef, he has a fire ring installed in his yard which is surrounded by log benches and stocks of firewood. He is almost an Argentine in his dedication.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 11:19:39
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3247
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

quote:

Don't get me wrong some times I love a good chimichanga but not when I'm in the mood for mexican food.


Glad to see you say that, Lenny. You no doubt are aware that the chimichanga was "invented" (if one "invents" food) in Arizona, with Tucson being the most likely source of origin. (Some say it was not so much invented as it came about accidently.) It then made its way south into Sonora, and later further on into Sinaloa.

Like you, I grew up on Mexican food. My mother and her parents lived in Mexico, and she did not come to the U.S. until she was 16 years old. My grandfather (her father) was with the railroad in management, based in Guaymas, and in the '30s when the Mexican government nationalized all the foreign-owned railroads and oil companies and kicked all the gringos associated with them out, my mother and her parents moved to the U.S. My mother was absolutely bilingual and could fix amazing Mexican dishes. When I was growing up we had tacos every Sunday for dinner. And they were made with corn tortillas, not the bland flour tortillas found in many restaurants. And real, delicious, authentic Mexican tacos, which are a a Northern Mexican dish, are generally made with shredded beef, not the ground beef that is so prevalent in the U.S..

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 14:38:09
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3247
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to BarkellWH

We should not forget that there is plenty of good seafood prepared in Mexico, both on the Gulf of Mexico side (Tampico, Vera Cruz) and on the Pacific/Sea of Cortez side. Mazatlan has the largest shrimp fleet on the Pacific coast, with most of the large shrimp caught in the Sea of Cortez. Mexico, like most places, has an astounding variety of dishes that go far beyond the usual fare that everyone associates with Mexico, good as they are. There are regional variations in Mexico just as there are in the U.S. I'm beginning to salivate as I write this, just thinking about it!

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 15:30:48
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

I did NOT know chimichangas are from Tuscon, god bless them for that! I figured it was somewhere in the southwest. Chimichangas, nachos and quesadillas, if I didn't have terrible genetics I'd eat that stuff daily!

Mexicos have great seafood, I've had some of the best seafood in my life in La Paz! I think the kings of ceviche though is El Salvador, most salvadorian restaurants have 15 types of ceviche and they're always all amazing!

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 17:05:55
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3131
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

The Peruvians proclaim themselves the inventors of ceviche. I don't know what the evidence is for inventing it, but they turn out some that's really good.

Our Italian friends had pasta for lunch and dinner every day. We usually skipped it, but fortunately we tried this:

1) tagliolini in lemon cream sauce

2) eaten under the lemon trees





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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 18:38:42
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3131
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to BarkellWH

When I moved to Austin almost sixty years ago to go to the University, I went with some new acquaintances to the "Mexican" restaurant a few blocks from our residence. Turns out all the boys were from the Texas panhandle, except for one Mexican American kid from San Antonio.

Back home we discussed the food. When asked his opinion, the Mexican kid said, "When the waiter served the chicken mole I thought he was trying to start a fight."

Things have improved greatly. Now there are quite a few places where you can get good tacos and other standard dishes. The upscale Fonda San Miguel is, in my opinion, one of the best Mexican restaurants on the planet. Their $40 Sunday brunch presents an immense buffet style spread of authentic stuff, in a beautiful room decorated with Mexican furniture, pierced tin chandeliers and paintings.

When I lived in Santa Barbara I used to drive to Redondo Beach fairly often on business. On the way back home I used to stop at the Familia Diaz restaurant in Santa Paula for bistec ranchero. Yum.

It took me a while to find a place I liked in Santa Barbara. Despite warnings from my gringo friends that I would get knifed, I tried the taco places on Milpas street. There was one that Julia Child enthused about. I wasn't impressed.

Down the street was Tacos al Pastor, Sucursal Numero Uno. There were at least ten kinds of tacos on offer, and a table with nine kinds of home made salsa. There was a family atmosphere. Only Spanish was spoken. I asked, since it was Sucursal Numero Uno, where was the headquarters? The answer: Chihuahua.

Next door was Pollos Norteños, with chickens roasted over a charcoal fire, pico de gallo, frijoles borrachos and hand made tortillas de maiz.

I was happy.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 19:07:42
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3247
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Richard Jernigan

One of my very favorite Mexican restaurants is Rosita's in Tempe, Arizona. It has been in business for over 60 years and is a family-owned. Rosita, the family matriarch, established the restaurant, and it has been run by her children and grandchildren ever since. I first started patronizing Rosita's as a student at Arizona State University. In a lifetime spent largely overseas, I would occasionally return to Arizona to see friends and family, and I would always make it a point to drop by Rosita's for a delicious lunch or dinner. The tacos are to die for and of course are made with shredded beef, as the very best tacos should be. I still eat at Rosita's when I am in the Phoenix-Tempe area. As might be imagined, there are some very good Mexican restaurants in the Tucson area as well. And I've never eaten better than at a restaurant called La Cocina in Taos, New Mexico many years ago. Don't know if it still exists.

As for ceviche, I love peruvian ceviche, but the ceviche in Chile is equal to it, in my opinion. And nothing goes better with ceviche than a couple of pisco sours. Yum!

Bill

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And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 30 2015 21:39:49
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

Are we the only ones who eat food on this forum????

Forgot all about Peruvian ceviche! There's a place here that imports it's peppers to get a more authentically Peruvian flavor and it definitely creates a different flavor profile. I liked it so much I'm actually planning on growing some Aji Limon peppers next season.

A great sit down Mexican restaurant is one thing, and a beautiful thing at that, but I love a good taqueria that just does what it does really well.
For me this is what a Taqueria menu should look like:

Sirvin:
Burritos
Tacos
Tortas
(Lately a lot of southern Mexico inspired places popping up so you see)
Gringas
Cemitas
Huaraches(LOVE THESE!)

Carne al gusto:
Carne Asada
Pollo Asado
Carnitas
Al Pastor
Buche
Tripas
Cabeza(My favorite, like the fatty roast beef)
Lengua(second favorite, like a lean roast beef)
Sesos(not for the faint of heart)

The only other things in there kitchen are onions, cilantro, escabeche, and a few salsas maybe avocados.

Gimme a big fat Torta de cabeza and I'm a happy camper!

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 31 2015 0:30:49
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3131
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

Indeed. Hereabouts cabeza tends to be called barbacoa. It´s a Texas/Tamaulipas/Nuevo Leon thing.But it often confuses Texas gringos who are thinking about smoked brisket. Carne asada is usually called pierna. I haven't seen sesos on the menu north of San Antonio, and there only on the West Side.

Of course Austin is the capital of breakfast tacos, with huevos, papas, chorizo, etc., but I haven't gotten into the swing of things.

Every couple of weeks I make myself a big skillet full of huevos revueltos a la Mexicana. In fact, that sounds pretty good right now.....

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 31 2015 1:17:55
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Asian Seafood (in reply to Leñador

Len,

I picked up your PM, limited computer time right now, back later. ~S

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https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 31 2015 1:18:42
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