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RE: Changes in sound of guitars over time   You are logged in as Guest
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jshelton5040

Posts: 1500
Joined: Jan. 17 2005
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to Morante

quote:

As a one time professional fishing instructor and enthusiast eater of wild salmon and trout, this salmon seems seriously overcooked. Good for wood, maybe, but salmon should still be practically raw in the centre as it comes to the table. The centre cooks on the way. With a bottle of Chassagne Montrachet, of course. a one time professional fishing instructor and enthusiast eater of wild salmon and trout, this salmon seems seriously overcooked. Good for wood, maybe, but salmon should still be practically raw in the centre as it comes to the table. The centre cooks on the way. With a bottle of Chassagne Montrachet, of course.
I presume you know that salmon and most other anandromous fish are loaded with parasites that happily inhabit a human body. If eaten raw salmon should be frozen for a minimum of 2 weeks first. I eat sushi weekly but salmon is not on the menu and the fish we do eat have been frozen. We're off to buy about 40 pounds of fresh caught Albacore tuna today which will be vacuum packed and frozen for this winter's sushi treats.

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John Shelton - www.sheltonfarrettaguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 24 2015 15:35:25
 
Ruphus

Posts: 3782
Joined: Nov. 18 2010
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to Anders Eliasson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Anders Eliasson

Do you have a list of those guitarmakers who have good and bad woods?
I was in Maderas Barber years ago and Burguet was there. We were picking more or less the same wood. He did of course pick a lot more because he has a factory while I´m only a single luthier doing everything. But I guess that this means that i qualify for being reknown for good quality as you say. Or do I have to cook, bake and fry my wood in order to be on the prominent part of that list?


How funny! It made Ricardo laugh. (Amusement triggered by humorous content that must be beyond me, but to each his own.)

Easy there.
You might have seen me saying that I could well think of that tonal characteristics being more determined by how a piece of wood is being worked than by its material quality.
So, no reason to get saucy, unless maybe its about something else like maybe jelousy over other makers (which in this case could be understandable, as I think that your flamencos are better than Burguet´s.)

Still, Amalio Burguet seems to be known for his stock of fine tone woods and I read that he is regularly being asked by other builders to share some.
A guitar of his that I own confirms the image. It is not just a really fine classical, but its BRW is optically patterned in a way that I havn´t seen anywhere.

Ruphus
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 24 2015 19:16:04
 
timoteo

 

Posts: 219
Joined: Jun. 22 2012
From: Seattle, USA

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to Morante

quote:

As a one time professional fishing instructor and enthusiast eater of wild salmon and trout, this salmon seems seriously overcooked. Good for wood, maybe, but salmon should still be practically raw in the centre as it comes to the table.


Yes, I quite agree - that's what I thought too.

The picture was just one I grabbed from the web, I chose that one because it showed a nice wood grain in the plank and it didn't have all sorts of garnish and extra stuff on the fish. But it sure does look dry and overcooked.

When I grill salmon (which is all the time - it's so cheap and fresh around here!) I sprinkle it with kosher salt and drizzle a little olive oil on it, then lightly grill so it's practically raw in the center. I don't use a plank, but sometimes I soak some wood chips and throw them on the fire for some smokey flavor. All the extra spices and sauces that people put on salmon just hide the flavor of the fish, which I guess is ok if you don't have good fish, but when fresh caught wild salmon is readily available it's a crime to mess with it.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 24 2015 19:21:58
 
Ruphus

Posts: 3782
Joined: Nov. 18 2010
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to timoteo

quote:

ORIGINAL: timoteo

All the extra spices and sauces that people put on salmon just hide the flavor of the fish, which I guess is ok if you don't have good fish, but when fresh caught wild salmon is readily available it's a crime to mess with it.


So totally agreeed!
Let alone darn lemmon to completely suffocate a fishs / seafoods flavour.

Another preserved habit from times when the ware would be tatty, without empirical update / with blind following.

Weird how useless procedures tend to be so sturdy, just as new insights tend to be neglected.

Ruphus
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 24 2015 20:01:37
 
Ricardo

Posts: 13344
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to Ruphus

quote:

ORIGINAL: Ruphus

quote:

ORIGINAL: timoteo

All the extra spices and sauces that people put on salmon just hide the flavor of the fish, which I guess is ok if you don't have good fish, but when fresh caught wild salmon is readily available it's a crime to mess with it.


So totally agreeed!
Let alone darn lemmon to completely suffocate a fishs / seafoods flavour.

Another preserved habit from times when the ware would be tatty, without empirical update / with blind following.

Weird how useless procedures tend to be so sturdy, just as new insights tend to be neglected.

Ruphus


Don't care what you say .... Lemon and butter and seafood is the best thing ever ... Especially w steak combo

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 25 2015 18:53:30
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3309
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to Ruphus

quote:

Let alone darn lemmon to completely suffocate a fishs / seafoods flavour.


Depends on the type of fish/seafood. For example, I do not like lemon or any other sauce or condiment on salmon, but I love lemon on flounder and trout filets. And there's nothing better than tarter sauce or lemon dill sauce on fried butterflied shrimp, in my opinion.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 25 2015 19:45:01
 
Ruphus

Posts: 3782
Joined: Nov. 18 2010
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to jshelton5040

The brilliant flavour of butter fried shrimps saured down and shrilled with lemmon juice.
A sacrilege on heavens culinary tongue, worth dozens of ketchupped fine sauces and hundreds finest vines filled into bowles.

In my humble kitchen* at least.

Ruphus

* Certainly though not in my current one.
There are hardly basics to be found here, not to think of fresh seafood or lesser even of any special culinary products.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 25 2015 21:29:00
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3220
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to BarkellWH

Generally I prefer sushi and sashimi to cooked fish, no matter how it's prepared. But twice in the last six weeks we ate at the restaurant La Gondola in Venice. It's in a street not far from the Piazza San Marco with a lot of restaurants frequented mainly by tourists at this time of year. The quality of restaurants throughout Italy is far superior to the run of the mill in the USA, in our experience, but La Gondola stands out in the freshness of its seafood. Twice we had a branzino (translated as sea bass on the English menu). The fish was big enough for two, prepared simply on the grill with no sauce, herbs or spices. Its freshness made its flaky white flesh delightful, along with glasses of cool prosecco. Yum !

Now, sadly, I am back in the land of industrially processed food substitutes and "white bread."

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 26 2015 16:21:14
 
jshelton5040

Posts: 1500
Joined: Jan. 17 2005
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to estebanana

quote:

ORIGINAL: estebanana

"Baking" tops is is different than Torrefaction, it means the tops are actually baked with heat and a tiny bit of moisture in a big commercial oven. There is a Youtube video of the process being done at the Taylor factory. There is no steam heat or vacuum chamber.

Both baking and Torrefaction render the wood more climatically stable; the companies that bake and Torrify ( terrify) the wood today are Yamaha, Martin and Taylor and several other smaller companies. The reason they claim they process this way is better sound, but it's my guess it also has much to do with warranty. The Baked T-fied woods are more stable and less prone to cracking and failure do to climate changes.

I think the Torrefied woods have a lot to offer, I may try one of the Torrified tops. For one thing the wood strength seems to measure the same after Torrefaction, but the weight is reduced by 20%- Plus it's more stable to climate change. How can that be a bad thing?

Stephen,
I remember in the distant past baking many tops. I used to sticker them and bake them in the oven around 185-190 degrees for several hours then let them cool slowly. I did this to lower the moisture content before gluing them up since there was no dehumidifier in my shop (I couldn't afford one). It didn't seem to hurt the top wood but I'm not aware of any improvement in tone.

_____________________________

John Shelton - www.sheltonfarrettaguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 26 2015 18:37:59
 
BarkellWH

Posts: 3309
Joined: Jul. 12 2009
From: Washington, DC

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to Richard Jernigan

quote:

Generally I prefer sushi and sashimi to cooked fish, no matter how it's prepared.


But surely you prefer sashimi with wasabi, even though 98 percent of what passes for wasabi in the U.S. and 95 percent of what passes for wasabi in Japan is fake. Even the fake wasabi we take with sashimi adds flavor; it adds the "bite" and "tang" that makes sashimi so delicious. Without wasabi, I would consider sashimi bland.

And I hope the owner of your favorite, La Gondola, in Venice treated you with a couple of postprandial grappas. A few years ago I was working a command post exercise with an army unit based in Vicenza. My colleague Francis Terry McNamara and I ate most of our dinners at a nice restaurant in Vicenza, and the owner rewarded our loyalty with a couple of after-dinner grappas, on the house, for each of us every evening.

Francis Terry McNamara, by the way, is a good friend of mine who played a tremendous part during the fall of South Vietnam. He was Consul General at our Consulate in Can Tho in the last days of Vietnam. He is the one who organized the famous evacuation of over 300 Vietnamese and their families, 18 Americans, and five Filipinos in a landing craft down the Mekong river and out into the sea, where he and his charges were picked up by a U.S. naval vessel.

He and I have worked many military exercises together, and I would have to say he is a genuine hero for his role in organizing and leading that evacuation down the Mekong. He achieved a degree of well-deserved fame, and he truly deserved his double dose of grappa in Vicenza. I was just along for the ride with mine.

Bill

_____________________________

And the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
With the name of the late deceased,
And the epitaph drear, "A fool lies here,
Who tried to hustle the East."

--Rudyard Kipling
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 26 2015 21:25:48
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to jshelton5040

What is this sushi of which you speak? And saw shee mee? Is that some new wood cutting tool?

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 27 2015 0:20:20
 
Leñador

Posts: 5237
Joined: Jun. 8 2012
From: Los Angeles

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to jshelton5040

I think you can saw a lot of she mee's in Bangkok... Lol

I've heard REALLY high end sushi is quite intentionally not super fresh.
I was just down in Los Cabos and down there the whole carpaccio sashimi is really popular and the sauces they come up with on that super fresh fish was outstanding! Nothing authentically Japanese but some of tastiest raw fish I've ever had. One night I ordered 12 different plates, one of every sauce they had, soooooooo good!

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 27 2015 4:11:33
 
keith

Posts: 1108
Joined: Sep. 29 2009
From: Land of Daniel Boone

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to jshelton5040

Baking wood to reduce moisture with the goal being a more stable wood makes sense and baking (torrifying?)wood to make charcoal or pellets makes sense and it seems somewhere in the middle might be good for guitar building. I wonder if soaking the wood in urine first (a' la Professor Nagyvary) and then quasi-torrifying it would be work? I guess this would be akin to marinating meat then grilling it.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 27 2015 12:36:23
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to Leñador

quote:

I think you can saw a lot of she mee's in Bangkok... Lol

I've heard REALLY high end sushi is quite intentionally not super fresh.
I was just down in Los Cabos and down there the whole carpaccio sashimi is really popular and the sauces they come up with on that super fresh fish was outstanding! Nothing authentically Japanese but some of tastiest raw fish I've ever had. One night I ordered 12 different plates, one of every sauce they had, soooooooo good!


The sashimi-carpaccio is very popular in Japan too, I've had some great versions in Osaka.

The thing about aging the fish is species dependent. Some you can eat the same day and they are tops others you want to clean and keep in the refrigerator for a day to be best. Ika is better if you clean it and then freeze it one night and thaw it out and eat it the second day or even a few days later. I think it degrades with long term freezing.

Some tuna freezes well and then cuts into nice sashimi, most of it is flash frozen on the big boats anyway. Freezing the fish makes it a bit more tender. Although I have to say I prefer no freezing and waiting a day or two in the refrigerator.

I think generally smaller fish are soft enough to cut for sashimi the same day and get good results, it's the bigger ones that seem to benefit from a bit of chilling time. That said, I've cut plenty the same day and been very happy with the taste.

Generally I'm with Richard, sashimi is my way of choice if the fish is a good sashimi fish. But, I also like the traditional Japanese ways of cooking fish, and I like tartar sauce, butter, lemon, salt & pepper, fried, salt grilled, baked, tempura or any other way you make fish as long as it's done right.

There is one baked fish dish I really like Buri Kama, it's the piece of the Yellow Tail that comes from behind the gills right where the head meets the body. It's a sickle shaped cut, Kama means sickle and Buri means Yellow tail, Yellow Tail Sickle.

You put it in a shallow baking pan and put course salt on both sides. Then bake it under the flame in your broiler for about 5 to 7 minutes on each side. The skin gets crisp, and the collagen from the rear of the gill (no bloody gills in the cut, just the back wall) structure melts a bit. Probably good for building strong flamenco finger nails.

That cut broiled does not need anything, it's not fishy. You just peel it apart with chopsticks and enjoy. One of the best things a fish lover will ever eat.

Stinky fish are interesting too, the Japanese know which fish smells funky and why so some fish that get a bad rap in the West are mysteriously not stinky here. Like Bonita, or Katsuo, a very important fish, in CA they call it is stinky, but if you slice out a certain part of the belly it's not not stinky anymore. Katsuo is also one of the fish that makes wonderful sashimi, but it has to be super fresh to be good. Otherwise it tends to go into the don't eat it raw zone pretty fast.

There's great traditional way of eating bonita almost like a carpaccio, it's called 'tataki'. I could explain it if you want.

And the lesson I learned about eating sashimi and sushi is that soy sauce is not just soy sauce. Shoyu is very subtle in how it effects the taste of fish. There are shoyu types made just for sashimi and once you get a taste of them the other kinds of cheap bad soy sauce don't cut the mustard. The cheap wasabi does not bother me or most people who eat sashimi, but the wrong soy sauce really messes up the taste of the fish. Most sushi places in the US serve the wrong kind.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 27 2015 14:34:19
 
Sr. Martins

Posts: 3077
Joined: Apr. 4 2011
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to jshelton5040

Baked maple for electric guitar fretboards is pretty common these days. Some get so dark that they look like rosewood.

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"Ya no me conoce el sol, porque yo duermo de dia"
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 27 2015 15:40:18
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3220
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to estebanana

My Japanese girlfriend and I used to eat katsuo (bonito) at Sachio Kojima's place, "Kabuto", in San Francisco. She said it was just like home. She also commented on the shoyu and wasabe as the real thing.

Last post I saw from Sachio-san, maybe a year ago, he said he was going home to Japan.

When I lived for six months in Honolulu I used to go to the fish market on Friday after work to get a pound of Ahi for sashimi. The wasabe, shoyu and pickled ginger were all from the gigantic Asian supermarket out by the airport, not too far from where I was working. I took advice from my Japanese girlfriend about the brands.

I was impressed by the apparently comprehensive diversity of the supermarket on one of my earlier visits. Two Asian women from different countries were in line at the cash register just in front of me. One of them indicated one of the other's purchases. "What's that?" she asked.

Bill, the fashionable complimentary alcoholic treat this year seems to be the intensely lemon flavored limoncello. We spent a couple of nights at the house of the father of one of Larisa's best Italian girlfriends. It sits on a few acres near Pordenone north of Venice, with peach trees, chickens, a vegetable garden and a yard with kennels for the hunting dogs. Enrico served us his home made lemon liqueur, made with heavy cream, much smoother than limoncello. He told us the recipe, but I don't plan to replicate it. A liter of the liqueur contains 800 grams of sugar!

Our hotel in Anacapri on the island of Capri has a lemon grove as its outdoor dining room. The hotel was started by the grandmother of the woman who is the present proprietor. The web page says Grandma invented limoncello. Every Italian to whom I quoted this assured me that people all over Italy claim their ancestor invented limoncello.

However the Anacapri hotel served tagliolini with lemon cream sauce that would knock your socks off.

But back to the subject of baking. I grew quite fond of my usual breakfast of a couple of cornetti grandi (croissants) a small piece of fresh fruit and a couple of cappucinos. The croissants come plain or filled with cream, chocolate or a variety of fruit preserves. Italian pastries are as good as the rest of the very excellent food we had everywhere we went.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 27 2015 16:55:15
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3220
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to estebanana

quote:

ORIGINAL: estebanana

The sashimi-carpaccio is very popular in Japan too, I've had some great versions in Osaka.



From Wikipedia: "Poké Ingredients:

Modern poké typically consists of cubed raw ʻahi (yellowfin tuna) marinated with sea salt, a small amount of soy sauce, inamona (roasted crushed candlenut), sesame oil, limu seaweed, and chopped chili pepper. Other variations of ingredients may include cured heʻe (octopus), other types of raw tuna, raw salmon and other kinds of sashimi, sliced or diced Maui onion, furikake, hot sauce (such as sambal olek), chopped ʻohiʻa (tomato), tobiko (flying fish roe), ogo or other types of seaweed, and garlic.

The selection of condiments has been heavily influenced by Japanese and other Asian cuisines."

When poké (Hawaiian for "to cut") first appeared on Sachio-san's whiteboard menu, my girlfriend, always the stickler for tradition, asked sweetly, "Poké, is that a Japanese word?"

The sarcasm was not lost on the half of the clientele who were Japanese expatriates. I had been told her Japanese accent is that of the school the Empress went to.

(Her American accent was note-perfect when she was 20. These days, 33 years later, she says she's from San Francisco and nobody doubts it.)

I didn't understand Sachio-san's reply, but as usual his wisecrack got a laugh from the customers. My girlfriend refused to translate, but I did make out the words "Pearl Harbor."

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 27 2015 22:32:41
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to jshelton5040

Poke' sounds good, my one almost constant disbelief with Japanese cuisine is that they don't embrace the chili. It could be so useful.

Speaking of accent, I try to learn words and phrases in the local dialect as much as I can. Standard Japanese is fine, but the local color in the language is more fun. Strategically spoken, 'Akune ben' also wins free drinks from hostesses who are shocked a amazed to hear the local slang issuing from the mouth of the tall white boy.

My favorite word is gane'. It's the local word for fried potatoes. They make what is essentially a hash brown fried in a deep frier with a little tempura batter. The criss crossed reddish brown strips of potato resemble a crab, the hash brown is about as big as your palm. Gane' means crab in Akune ben, so hash browns are called crabs.

And I can attest that gane' are crispy wonderfulness and are served unapologetically by the basket full with the most American of sauces, ketchup.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 27 2015 23:17:43
 
Richard Jernigan

Posts: 3220
Joined: Jan. 20 2004
From: Austin, Texas USA

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to estebanana

On my second visit to Bali I learned that ketchup is actually a Malay (thus also Bahasa Indonesia) word, kecap. In modern Malay spelling, "c" is always pronounced like "ch" in English.

Of course, Malay kecap isn't exactly like American ketchup. The version I encountered is a thinner tomato sauce containing both mint and hot peppers, so it's simultaneously hot and cool--a stroke of genius.

RNJ
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 28 2015 0:36:13
 
Ruphus

Posts: 3782
Joined: Nov. 18 2010
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to jshelton5040

None of the raw eaters responded to issues like the parasites mentioned in the first post of this page.

I really wonder how that goes with the huge number of todays consumers who adapted the fashion of sushi. (Inlcuding a former Italian girl friend of mine who to my surprise promptly liked the stuff when we first [and for me last time] tried this kind of thing in NY in the early 80s.)

Do you assume all the samples to have passed labs beforehand, or how do you relax on the risk of fetching fierce deseases?

Ruphus
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 28 2015 12:32:06
 
jshelton5040

Posts: 1500
Joined: Jan. 17 2005
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to Ruphus

quote:

ORIGINAL: Ruphus

None of the raw eaters responded to issues like the parasites mentioned in the first post of this page.


I was referring specifically to anandromous fish like salmon. The parasites in most salt water fish will not infest humans. I have loved sushi for many years and eat it weekly.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 28 2015 13:56:10
 
Morante

 

Posts: 1907
Joined: Nov. 21 2010
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to jshelton5040

quote:

I was referring specifically to anandromous fish like salmon. The parasites in most salt water fish will not infest humans


I remember the trick was to put the fish in the fridge overnight. The little worms would come out to dance on the plate. Then you could eat the fish and , if desired, deep fry the worms in batter
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 28 2015 15:14:50
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to jshelton5040

quote:

I remember the trick was to put the fish in the fridge overnight. The little worms would come out to dance on the plate. Then you could eat the fish and , if desired, deep fry the worms in batter


Are you sure you are not confusing salmon with casu marzu from Sardinia?

Salmon is good cooked well done and crispy on the out side as well as raw in the middle. Oddly I'm not really a salmon enthusiast. When I'm served salmon sashimi I always try to trade it off to someone near me for something better. Getting squid for salmon is always a good bargain, according to me.

And all salmon of course goes to the NSIPIL - National Sashimi Inspections and Parasitic Infestation Labs - for careful cleaning before being certified to be served.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 28 2015 23:34:40
 
Ruphus

Posts: 3782
Joined: Nov. 18 2010
 

RE: Changes in sound of guitars over... (in reply to jshelton5040

I recall some serious warnings from years ago about sea fishs parasites.
Killing those takes boiling or extended freezing.
(As I love fried fish the most -and smoked ones, appreciating wild salmon best smoked - taking the risk of eventually surviving worms.)

quote:

Many consumers prefer the delicate flavor and texture of uncooked fish found in sushi and sashimi (thin slices of raw finfish) dishes. But there should be caution in consuming raw fish because some species of fish can contain these harmful worms. Eating raw, lightly cured, or insufficiently cooked infected fish can transfer the live worms to humans. Most of these parasites cannot adapt to human hosts. Often, if an infected fish is eaten, the parasites may be digested with no ill effects. Adequate freezing or cooking fish will kill any parasites that may be present. Raw fish (such as sushi or sashimi) or foods made with raw fish (such as ceviche) are more likely to contain parasites or bacteria than foods made from cooked fish, so it's important to cook fish thoroughly (at least 145°F for 15 seconds) or use commercially frozen seafood in raw dishes.
Two types of parasitic worms can infect humans:

1. Anisakiasis is caused by ingesting the larvae of several types of roundworm which are found in saltwater fish such as cod, plaice, halibut, rockfish, herring, Pollock, sea bass and flounder.

2. Tapeworm infections occur after ingesting the larvae of diphyllobothrium which is found in freshwater fish such as pike, perch and anadromous (fresh-saltwater) fish such as salmon.

During commercial freezing fish is frozen solid at a temperature of -35°F and stored at this temperature or below for a minimum of 15 hours to kill parasites. Most home freezers have temperatures at 0°F to 10°F and may not be cold enough to kill parasites because it can take up to 7 days at -4°F or below to kill parasites, especially in large fish. Good handling practices on-board fishing vessels and in processing plants can minimize nematode infestation. Many seafood processors inspect seafood fillets of species likely to contain parasites. This process called candling involves examining fish fillets over lights. Candling detects surface parasites. Unfortunately, they cannot always see parasites embedded deep in thick fillets or in dark tissue. Candling is also useful for revealing pinbones in fillets that are intended to be boneless.

Fish is also safe to eat after it is cooked to an internal temperature of 145°F for 15 seconds. Normal cooking procedures generally exceed this temperature. If a thermometer is not available to check the internal temperature of the thickest portion of the fish, the fish should be cooked until it loses its translucency and flakes easily with a fork.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Jul. 29 2015 14:41:18
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