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turnermoran

Posts: 391
Joined: Feb. 6 2010
 

Question about seguyrias notation 

I was looking at the Moraito Encuentro book last night, and the seguyrias is notated in alternating measures of 6/8 and 3/4.

For sake of my question, lets speak in terms of the 12 beat structure, where the seguyrias begins on 8.

In the sheet music, Is this interpreted as a meas. of 6/8 starting with the last beat of the seguyrias compas? (Beat 6-7)

And thus the bar of 3/4 is beats 12 - 5, with the feel of that measure being two dotted quarter notes?
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 8 2012 18:09:00
 
Erik van Goch

 

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Joined: Jul. 17 2012
From: Netherlands

RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to turnermoran

People knowing flamenco generally can't write music and the people hired to write it down for them in general have no concept of the compas grammar involved. As a result they all struggle and various books use various systems because they simply have no idea how to deal with the compas on paper. More often than not notes end up in totally the wrong place.

My father happens to be a master in both flamenco and written music. His scores (used by Paco Peña at Rotterdam university of music) are the very best in existence but are kept behind bars and are only available for a hand full of select students. Being 1 of them i recently tried to explain some of the compas management of seguiriyas in this post...

I'm still working on it and will re-eddid it soon. I'm afraid it is based on the 5 beat system but you might like (some of) it. In general it is not advisable to try to play falsetas or compas- variations you don't understand (one way or the other) while listening to/studying the example, so please try to understand/feel the compas of your material before you give it a try yourself. As far as Seguiriyas is concerned i guess Paco de Lucia and Paco Peña might be more easy to fallow/understand than maestro Moraito, but i have to check the encuentro recording to be sure (if i could find the bloody thing :-)

http://www.foroflamenco.com/tm.asp?m=211873&mpage=1&p=&tmode=1&smode=1&key=
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 8 2012 18:41:59
 
rogeliocan

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From: Canada

RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to turnermoran

That is the way I read it too. But I find the use of the time signatures complicates things. I would have preferred no time and just have 12 beats per line, then it would start on 8 with the last beat on the line 7.... to me just makes it easier to follow although once you get what they did, what they have works too.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 8 2012 20:36:17
 
Erik van Goch

 

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Joined: Jul. 17 2012
From: Netherlands

RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to turnermoran

Many people prefer to use the alternative 12 beat system. But the difference between seguiriyas and bulerias is that in bulerias the pulses are 5 GROUPS of beats and in seguiriys they are 5 SINGLE beats.


>........>.........>..............>..............>......
xx..xx..xx..xx..xx..xx..xx..xx..xx..xx..xx..xx bulerias (2 notes a beat)
xxxx....xxxx.....xxxxxx.....xxxxxx.......xxxx..seguiriyas (4-6notes a beat)

To me those 12 groups of 2 beats seems less informative then my fathers 5 beat system, visually connecting all the notes within 1 beat. On top, the hand written scores of my father also have the possibility to show the 12 inner-beats, combining the visual clearness of the 5 beat system with the instant possibility to zoom in adapting the 12 beat system.

/>......./>......../>............/>............/>.......
/xx.xx../xx.xx../xx.xx.xx../xx.xx.xx../xx.xx.....5 beats showing inner beats

/>.../..../>../..../>.../..../..../>../..../..../>../....
/xx./xx./xx./xx./xx./xx./xx./xx./xx./xx./xx./xx 12 beat bulerias

He only applies it when larger amounts of notes are played like:

/xxxx/xxxx/xxxx/xxxx/xxxx/xxxx/xxxx/xxxx/xxxx/xxxx/xxxx/xxxx....12 beat system

/xxxx..xxxx/xxxx..xxxx/xxxx..xxxx..xxxx/xxxx..xxxx..xxxx/xxxx..xxxx.......5 beat system

Personally i prefer the visual clearness of the 5 beats system adapting inner beats when needed (which basically integrates the 12 beat system within the 5 beat system). I can spot my beat 4 in a second and zoom in to study the inner beats or the even smaller micro beats.....can you?? In your case you have to find the 8th pair of notes from the left (or the 5th from the right).
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 8 2012 22:27:45
 
Ricardo

Posts: 13341
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From: Washington DC

RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to turnermoran

Good readers understand that phrasing needs to be conveyed by the meter and beaming of subdivisions. IN this sense siguiriyas does not have the same symmetry as buleria guajira etc and should not really be notated the same way. THe simple phrase that any drummer probably understands is 7/8 (beamed as 1,2,12,1,2,3) for the Bb harmony and phrase, coupled or always alteternated with a 5/8 bar (beamed as 1,2,3,1,2) which is the A chord or remate phrase.

Even it is obvious to me having hung with drummers that showed me various odd meter concepts, this method I have never seen adapted to siguiriyas by people transcribing.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 9 2012 15:27:18
 
turnermoran

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RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to turnermoran

thanks to all for your input. Looks like no one managed to answer my question, but I realized I just needed to watch the video and compare to the notation to answer my own question. Duh. (funny how having a toddler means that that simple task may take days to make happen).

Anyway, the Encuentro notation is not what I guessed. It's actually as follows:

starts with a measure of 3/4, where beat 1 is the end of the compás. (or a rest if you are beginning the compás)
Beat 2 & 3 of that measure are the duple meter beats. (One-and-Two-and)
Then the measure of 6/8 is the triple meter part of the compás (Three-and-a-Four-and-a)
And then it goes back to 3/4 where the first beat, as previously mentioned, is the last beat of the compás (Five-and).

No doubt, an awkward way to notate. Too bad the alternating measures of 7/8 and 5/8 haven't caught on, as per Ricardo's suggestion. While some may take issue that it doesn't capture the compás perfectly, at least it conveys the complexity of the compás, but also keeps the "beat" (the 8th note) constant, and the compás would start on beat 1, which is where "notation" and "musical phrasing" must intersect for there to be any logic in the system.

That's part of what makes the 3/4 - 6/8 thing confusing; no where do they indicate that "eighth note equals eighth note", and if the goal is to take a style of music that doesn't conform well to the written paper and notate it, there is no point to breaking the fundamental goal of notation by starting a phrase in the middle of measure.
For those who don't read music, they don't need the paper. And for those who do, they will be misguided.
total fail
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 9 2012 18:44:55
 
estebanana

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RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to turnermoran

Well, not to go against the master plotters, but I always think notating siguiriyas is a funny idea. I think standard tab works best, and then listen to the way the compas works if you can get tab of a known track.

In that video at the end Moraito comes to the same conclusion. He shrugs his shoulders and says play the compas with your heart. Siguiriyas has elastic compas when playing for a singer and more strict when for a dancer. The idea that you would actually copy meticulously a siguiriyas is foreign idea to me completely. It seems like it is so nuanced in how you articulate the details in time that it would be impossible to write it down.

I read music, but if I were to write down siguiryas or at least make sketch of one, I would use tabulature and write the 12 beat structure over the tab with the '8' being the first beat. I think it's too complicated to bother to write it in notation because you want to take a siguiriyas off the page as soon as possible and start to play with it an make it your own. Ideally you would learn a siguiriyas by rote for another guitarist or by listening to Melchor or some other player like that.

I think a lot of people just have too much pride to "give in" to the obvious way of notating it with 8-, 10-, 12-, 123, 456-7 simplicity. And sure, when you play for a dance class or a dancer they will count as a five beat thingy because that is what dancers do and how they are taught, but that does not mean it makes the most sense to notate that way for guitar. And if a guitar teacher counts siguriyas as a five beat thingy, you can learn it that way too, but still notate it with simple tab.

I doubt Melchor de Marchena, one of the greatest siguiyeros bothered to write down one scrap. \

Clarity really just depends on how you primarily understand it, what is clear for one person looks like cloudy water to another.


...


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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 9 2012 19:38:17
 
Erik van Goch

 

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Joined: Jul. 17 2012
From: Netherlands

RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to estebanana

quote:

ORIGINAL: estebanana


....In that video at the end Moraito comes to the same conclusion. He shrugs his shoulders and says play the compas with your heart. Siguiriyas has elastic compas when playing for a singer and more strict when for a dancer...... It seems like it is so nuanced in how you articulate the details in time that it would be impossible to write it down.


.... I think it's too complicated to bother to write it in notation because you want to take a siguiriyas off the page as soon as possible and start to play with it an make it your own. Ideally you would learn a siguiriyas by rote for another guitarist or by listening to Melchor or some other player like that.

I think a lot of people just have too much pride to "give in" to the obvious way of notating it with 8-, 10-, 12-, 123, 456-7 simplicity. And sure, when you play for a dance class or a dancer they will count as a five beat thingy because that is what dancers do and how they are taught, but that does not mean it makes the most sense to notate that way for guitar. And if a guitar teacher counts siguriyas as a five beat thingy, you can learn it that way too, but still notate it with simple tab.

I doubt Melchor de Marchena, one of the greatest siguiyeros bothered to write down one scrap. \

Clarity really just depends on how you primarily understand it, what is clear for one person looks like cloudy water to another.


...




Over a 60 year period of studying, playing, arranging, composing and annotating numerous kinds of music my father developed a highly sophisticated way of dealing with structure, rhythm, context and interpretation. He devoted 20 years of his live studying/teaching the art of flamenco guitar on a full time base (basically 24/7) and invested thousands and thousands of ours in analyzing/annotating every aspect of the art of flamenco guitar in the smallest details imaginable. His handwritten flamenco scores are the very best in existence but available for flamenco students of Rotterdam University of Music only (and even they don't have unrestricted access). No printed/published music known to me (flamenco, classical or otherwise) are a match to the handwritten scores he produced over the years His more than 1000 pages of flamenco music (covering over 20 styles) show you the exact notes, rhythm, left /right hand fingering and (way better than others) the musical/technical context of every single note in relation to the compas and the other notes played.

"Siguiriyas has elastic compas when playing for a singer and more strict when for a dancer...... It seems like it is so nuanced in how you articulate the details in time that it would be impossible to write it down".

I guess the only restrictions my father have are the rhythmic restrictions of written music in general which affect all music from rock to Bach. But within those restrictions he adapted a highly sophisticated way of dealing with structure, rhythm, context and interpretation. Notes/rhythms that are part of the main layer(s) are annotated as usual and notes/rhythms that can be considered as secondary layers are annotated in smaller notes/rhythmic interludes (just like using (...) in written words). As a result all the events are annotated and enjoyed in the same order and with the same level of importance as intended by the artist and in that sense his scores does indeed honer the original idea in every detail.

As far as the "elastic compas" is concerned, that's precisely what it is ELASTIC.....but like a real elastic everything still has an underlaying (un-stretched) base that can be annotated as usual. It's up to the artist if he wants to speed up/slow down and to witch extent. Moraito himself happens to be a very emotional player and most of his seguiriyas falsetas suffer a high dose of unexpected (almost volcanic) speed eruptions. It is nice that he "fallows his heart" but like you stated, what is clear to one person looks like cloudy water to another and although i'm a very experienced player/listener i find it impossible to interpreted his extreme speed eruptions at first ear. It's like he is starting a nice and clear line andsuddenlygets(over)motionalandspeedsuplikehell. Obviously when i re-listen it i can deduct "and suddenly gets (over)emotional and speeds up like hell", which also would be the line annotated by my father (spoken text is also notated in spanish and not in the artists dialect or (sometimes unintended) personal habits).

As far as seguiriyas is concerned my father insisted on using the 5 beat system since this is the pulse felt by (most) professional singers, dancers and guitar player. As a result the main pulse is very clear and you never have to doubt the position of any given note to the main pulse. But like i said, his handwritten music can be enjoyed on many levels and as soon as a lot of notes are played he also shows/clusters the inner beats, creating an artificial 12-beat system inside the 5-beat system (combining the visual clearness of the main pulse with the possibility to zoom in in details).

for instance with rasgueados on beat 3 and 4 (aka 12-5) in a llamada

3....(and)....(the)...../4....(and)...(the)..../5....(and)...
12../1........./2........./3...../4......../5......./6

*....****....****..../* *...****...****./*.............(5-beat system showing inner beats)
*.../****.../****.../* *../****../****...*.............(standard 12-beat bulerias notation)

This clearly shows the advantage of using a 5 beat system (adapting inner beasts when necessary) in comparison to a standard 12 beat notation..... both show the same clusters of notes but the 5 beat system shows you the main pulse as well.

And as far as "i think it's to complicated to bother to write it in notation because you want to take a seguiriyas off the page as soon as possible and start to play it and make it your own" is concerned.....

If a highly trained expert like my father bothers to inventory/select the very best material available, spends years to check/annotate the exact notes, the exact fingering, the exact rhythm, the interpretation and the underlaying structures (all based on a lifetime of experience being amongst top level players) that does not only offer you the notes but also that lifetime of experience (lifetimes in fact since 2 simple pages of music explaining Paco Peñas basic set up of fandangos took my father a couple of hours but it took Paco years to acquire that knowledge....all it took me was the costs of the copying machine).

I once had to learn Paco Peñas Solea por Bulerias. Having it on paper it took me only 3 hours to memorize the notes, the rhythm and the fingering.... i tip my hat if you can memorize that piece in a week using ear play only! His Peteneras took me 3 hours as well.... Funny enough the only piece that gave me "a hard time" was Serranas (basically a seguiriyas in e). The 5 beat system (covering beats of various length and seemingly endless waves of notes) indeed seemed "to much to handle" at first and after 3 hours of struggling i only managed to memorize 1 out of 14 pages of music.....but once i got the drift of it i memorized the other 13 pages in 2 hours..... i'm pretty sure i couldn't have ear played that piece in 5 hours, let along understand it!
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 10 2012 18:09:02
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to Erik van Goch

quote:

Moraito himself happens to be a very emotional player and most of his seguiriyas falsetas suffer a high dose of unexpected (almost volcanic) speed eruptions.


Well there lies the rub.

If you disparage Moraito his compas and say his siguiriyas suffers from emotional doses of speed change I would not know where to take the conversation next.

I guess volcanic eruptions happened not only in old Pompeii, but in Jerez as well. And I wish that 'Volcan Moraito' was still erupting. God bless him.

----------

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 10 2012 18:26:23
 
Erik van Goch

 

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Joined: Jul. 17 2012
From: Netherlands

RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to estebanana

quote:

ORIGINAL: estebanana

quote:

Moraito himself happens to be a very emotional player and most of his seguiriyas falsetas suffer a high dose of unexpected (almost volcanic) speed eruptions.


Well there lies the rub.

If you disparage Moraito his compas and say his siguiriyas suffers from emotional doses of speed change I would not know where to take the conversation next.

I guess volcanic eruptions happened not only in old Pompeii, but in Jerez as well. And I wish that 'Volcan Moraito' was still erupting. God bless him.

----------



So would i....i adored the man. We had the honor to work with him a couple of days shortly before he died. He seemed very pleased to find himself a group of people that "instantly" could fallow, understand (and partly play) the material he presented us....until he proudly presented a seguiriyas falseta that he learned as a child and had treasured ever since. We couldn't understand that one at all. First he tried to play it a little more clearly... than he started to have doubt himself.....and finally he agreed that it was indeed out of compas ....over the years it somehow changed up to a point were it no longer fallowed the intended compas of seguiryas. Since i like the guy (and hated the idea of depriving him from a beloved falseta) i spend a couple of hours trying to reconstruct the original idea behind it and indeed came up with 2 plausible variations.

As far as Moraito is concerned, this story only shows that even the very very best can make mistakes every now and than.....they all do. Vicente for instance overlooked an 11 beat compas in his price winning soleares which comes back 4 times in a row....it took both of us years to discover it :-)

Andifyouconciderthistobeaperfactlyenjoyablewayofreadingbemyguest;personallyipreferthewordstobeseparated,butthat'sprobablyalackofexperience:-)
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 10 2012 19:28:11
 
estebanana

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RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to turnermoran

Erik I could comment on lots of things. I appreciate you went to the task of notating something by a master.

But I have to say that basically your way of looking at flamenco and priorities around it are totally mysterious to me. I simply can't wrap my mind around your priorities, not to say that you should not do what you do.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 10 2012 21:36:57
 
edguerin

Posts: 1562
Joined: Dec. 24 2007
From: Siegburg, Alemania

RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to turnermoran

check out this very informative message by Eric van Goch

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Ed

El aficionado solitario
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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 11 2012 8:58:49
 
Ricardo

Posts: 13341
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to estebanana

quote:

ORIGINAL: estebanana

Erik I could comment on lots of things. I appreciate you went to the task of notating something by a master.

But I have to say that basically your way of looking at flamenco and priorities around it are totally mysterious to me. I simply can't wrap my mind around your priorities, not to say that you should not do what you do.


Simply put, Erik is very methodical as it's in his blood. Being of similar stock myself i appreciate his thoughts on this and agree with him whole heartedly. I always was aware that though complex, the music notation system out to be able to catch EVERY detail of both cante and guitar and even baile if you wanted. Its mathematical certainty. I would need to see his dad's work to believe he really took it to that level but I know it is possible. THe point about siguiriyas is true as well. I spent DAYS working that Manuel Morao alzapua in various ways trying to find the intent until it became obvious it was simply NOT EVER IN COMPAS. the only way I made it work out was to simply add a few notes to it. Basic math, nothing to argue about.

Now having said all that, I will admit I had to "tip my hat" as Erik implied to MANY guitar students through the years that simply could pick up things and retain em faster than me. More for the reasons Estebanan is on about....you have to ignore ALL the details sometimes and try to make it like a language or discussion you are having and not think about it at all, just DO IT. It's not easy but it does start with concept of compas. And suddenly I found myself at a point where the time spent checking and rechecking each detail of compas slowly was more time consuming than just hearing it and instantly mimicking the feeling.

So while I believe in Eriks approach and agree it can prove Moraito himself was always "wrong" and didn't know it, I don't necessarily believe any more it's such a "good" thing. I would say, its ok to KNOWINGLY play things wrong if it is the MORE AUTHENTIC thing to do. Hope that makes sense.

HEre was siguiriyas out of compas and finally my personal edited to actually be IN compas version. I leave it to others to decide if what I did was better or worse by making it fit.


I got it from one of the variations in this video at 5:37:


In compas:


Ricardo

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 11 2012 13:55:44
 
bursche

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From: Frankfurt, Germany

RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to Ricardo

uf...I spent 2 days with the Pepe Habichuela Method before I put the notation aside forever and just watched the videos. slowed down if necessary. Soo much easier! I can't make music sound in my head from the paper.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 11 2012 14:14:34
 
estebanana

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RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to Ricardo

quote:

Simply put, Erik is very methodical as it's in his blood. Being of similar stock myself i appreciate his thoughts on this and agree with him whole heartedly. I always was aware that though complex, the music notation system out to be able to catch EVERY detail of both cante and guitar and even baile if you wanted. Its mathematical certainty.


Oh I get it, I'm part Northern European methodical wonk myself. And I know that mathmatically music can be fully notated, but we have not yet come up with an equation for feelings.

I am not saying notation is bad of that Erik's work is not valuable, because it is. I think I am getting at different ways to preserve or access music like siguiriyas. When it comes to Jerez siguyriyas I would think that some of it is out of compas, but I would not consider that an issue or a mistake. It simply is part of how that music works. Flamenco is not perfect or neat in every way.

Erik was mentioning that he can't get/hear a falseta on first listening but that it takes two times. Well for me it takes about two dozen times or more. I would not be able to learn a complex flamenco falseta from detailed notation alone. It would hinder how I get at it. The detail would clog up a fluent passing though the music. I have to hear it in my head for beginning to end and the fastest way is to listen to recordings. So I listen to a piece over several days if not months to internalize it, then try to work it out.

But to be fair, yes if I had to know certain details about fingering or fast notes I can't get I would refer to a notated sheet. But for me and this may be different for others, I could not learn how to play it in time from the sheet, I would refer back to how I internalize it an use that internal what ever it is to order the speed, feeling and note duration.

I guess we all go about it different ways. So I don't want anyone to think I don't value the preservation in written form of Moraito's music, because I do, I just have a different way of catching on to it.

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 11 2012 19:18:34
 
Erik van Goch

 

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Joined: Jul. 17 2012
From: Netherlands

RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to Ricardo

quote:

ORIGINAL: Ricardo

I always was aware that though complex, the music notation system out to be able to catch EVERY detail of both cante and guitar and even baile if you wanted.
Ricardo



I don't see a problem in annotating dance, cante however is a totally different matter. My father only annotated the basic melodies/escobillas of the main cantes/dances from the guitarists point of view, focussing on basic melody, structure, compas relation, chord changes and key/que-notes so the students could study them in advance in order not to waste to much time during the live sessions with singers and dancers.

But annotating a song in full detail is a challenge he never had or dared to face. Obviously he listened to it a lot and he sometimes expressed his ideas about the (im)possibility to annotate cante. If i remember well it strongly depended on the quality and the style of singer. Some singers go straight from one tone to the other, others take the tourist route including lots of surrounding notes before they go to the key note. Some singers produce notes that are almost impossible to pitch. Others are true masters of using quarter tones. On top there are various ways of glissando's and other bindings that should be considered. I guess my father could have found some creative ways to deal with some of the problems involved but his general believe is that it is basically impossible to capture cante in full detail. The few times he tried it drove him crazy :-). It would be interesting to consult/study transcriptions of arabic music who have similar kinds of problems and probably have adapted sensible ways to deal with them.

But i'm sure you would love his toque transcriptions, especially those of the free forms which happened to be our specialty. As a rule my father always favor to show the relation to the main beat so you can always tell were you are. So a syncope is annotated in paired 1/8 notes with over bindings like this:

/12and /1 and /2 and/3
/.S..S~/S...S~/S...S.../S

As you know many others restrict to using solitaire 1/4 (long) and 1/8 (small) notes which give you no clue at all about the inner beat position.

.12..and.1..and..2.and.3
..S...L.........L.........S....S

And you'll totally love the small note interludes adding occasional secondary layers of events in relation to the main events (without contributing to/interfering with the main rhythm itself).... i can't show them with these characters but textual () interludes comes close.

Funny enough i can write notes myself but i can hardly read them :-) The scores of my father i have to spell out note by note, phrase by phrase and that's also how i memorize them...every time i add just as many notes as i can remember. In my student's years ('85-'93) i was able to memorize a 14 page score in about 3 hours...but than the work only had to begin and it would take me days or weeks to master the pice itself.

As far as Moraito's seguiriyas on the enquentro dvd is concerned: as far as i can judge it basically seems to be correct and in compas. My main objection was that at the end of a falseta he accelerate extremely making it very difficult to fallow the compas for untrained ears.............

But speaking about untrained ears, i might have become a little rusty myself. In my initial perception he accelerated in a split second from 20 to 120 miles/hour without adapting a gliding scale or a proper warning, which gave me the feeling of entering a roller coaster. When estebana responded that speed eruptions are common practice in flamenco and my critic basically excluded me from a sensible conversation my initial thought was "speed eruptions yes, but not this roller coaster approach.....

However, after watching it again (just did) i must admit that his acceleration is far less slpit second than i initially thought it was, and that he is using a gliding scale after all. I'm not sure i was a little rusty the first time i checked or to tired or suffering a bad day (i did indeed become ill shortly after) but that gliding scale to me makes all the difference and if this was a boxing game estebanana definitely would have won the game!

Moraito's rasgueado introduction (which is very very nice) is based on the fabulous chord Paco de Lucia once used as an introduction to his bulerias.....i know Moraito adored that chord as much as i do. The cante part is a nice illustration to some of the variations i mentioned in above link of edguerin and the falseta's are fine if you can fallow the accelerations and inner compas.


I thanks both Ricardo and edguerin for their support and i thank estebanana for barking and showing his teeth at the right moment :-)
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 11 2012 20:41:32
 
estebanana

Posts: 8324
Joined: Oct. 16 2009
 

RE: Question about seguyrias notation (in reply to turnermoran

Ok now I'm going crazy again, but I will go have lunch in my dog bowl instead of bark.

now where is my leash I must go walk myself.....

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https://www.stephenfaulkguitars.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Oct. 11 2012 21:01:47
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