Foro Flamenco
Posts Since Last Visit | Advanced Search | Home | Register | Login

Today's Posts | Inbox | Profile | Our Rules | Contact Admin | Log Out



Welcome to one of the most active flamenco sites on the Internet. Guests can read most posts but if you want to participate click here to register.
This site is dedicated to the memory of Paco de Lucía, Ron Mitchell, Guy Williams, Linda Elvira and Philip John Lee who went ahead of us too soon.
We receive 12,200 visitors a month from 200 countries and 1.7 million page impressions a year. To advertise on this site please contact us.





Practice and Musicality   You are logged in as Guest
Users viewing this topic: none
  Printable Version
All Forums >>Discussions >>General >> Page: [1] 2 3    >   >>
Login
Message<< Newer Topic  Older Topic >>
 
Grisha

 

Posts: 1251
Joined: Mar. 17 2005
 

Practice and Musicality 

I have noticed the same thing over the years. Whenever I practice a lot my playing becomes tighter, clearer, more controlled and detailed. But something else disappears in the process. I am not dying and being born when I play, I am not falling in love, there is no jealousy or joy, no disappointment, no pain, no drama whatsoever. It's just a satisfying experience of playing (almost) perfectly. But there is no musicality, no honesty in my playing. However, when I don't practice so intensely, I have all these things in abundance, almost too much. I am usually overfilled with emotions and they make me make mistakes.

How can this be? I still love music and some recordings really touch my heart. I just can't express my emotions when playing guitar.

I have had a busy concert schedule for the last 2 months, so I am currently experiencing this musical block. Any comments?

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 1:09:10
 
elroby

 

Posts: 142
Joined: Mar. 25 2007
 

[Deleted] 

Post has been moved to the Recycle Bin at May 5 2012 3:57:53
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 1:35:04

ToddK

 

Posts: 2960
Joined: Dec. 6 2004
 

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

I think this is a fairly common phenomenon really, it IS easy to fall into
chasing tecnical perfection, and possibly forget about the emotion.

I believe you are at a place now where you realize that its not so much about physical practice for you anymore.
The next decade of your career will be about your life expirience, and infusing
that into your playing. Real feelings and emotions, not just conjured up.

Let yourself out of the woodshed, you've accomplished that. Now its all
about the art.
Relish this next decade, you are in your prime.



Always an honor to talk with you Grisha.
Saludos
TK

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 3:52:54
 
Pgh_flamenco

 

Posts: 1343
Joined: Dec. 5 2007
From: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

Interesting post, Grisha. When I used to practice drills on electric guitar for several hours a day I noticed I was less sharp intellectually. It seemed pretty obvious I was losing something emotionally and in some ways I was mentally/intellectually numb because of all of the practice. If you look at a motor and sensory homunculus you'll see that a HUGE amount of nerve endings are located in the finger tips. If you stimulate the same nerve endings (and the areas of the brain that correlate with them) over and over again you are basically interfering with the way the rest of your brain functions. If you could find other ways of exercising your entire body as well as engaging in the type of intellectual activity that enhances the precision fine motor skills you will be better off than just practicing guitar for hours on end. I know this advice isn't too specific, but there are new ways of stimulating the brain using computers that might be able to help you avoid this pitfall. An improved diet and exercise routine combined with a shorter, more efficient practice routine could probably help you avoid improving your technique at the expense of your sensitivity and vice versa. Though not simple, it's all about finding the proper balance.

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 4:03:05
Guest

[Deleted] (in reply to Grisha

[Deleted by Admins]
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 4:24:19
 
Ramon Amira

 

Posts: 1025
Joined: Oct. 14 2009
From: New York City

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

Grisha –

You said something interesting that I can speak to: "a satisfying experience of playing (almost) perfectly - but there is no musicality, no honesty in my playing." In my days as a classical and flamenco guitar critic I reviewed more than one concert where the guitarist played utterly perfectly - but that just means he was note perfect – clearly the result of long hours of practice.

But there was no – as you say – musicality. Sometimes long and severe practice distorts our focus - so intent was he on the notes that he forgot about the music. I also reviewed some players who made several mistakes but moved me so emotionally that I couldn't have cared less about the mistakes.

There are a couple of things you might give some thought to. First is to not worry about making an occasional mistake. I have watched some of the most famous musicians in the world make mistakes. There are two main reasons for long practice. One is obviously A) to learn the music. The other is B) to preclude making a mistake in performance. I think perhaps you might be spending more time than is necessary on B. A performer at your level of virtuosity is not going to make many mistakes. And if you don't worry about it and just allow yourself to make an occasional one, you probably won't.

I have one other suggestion you might think about – not right away, but to ponder over time. I know you also play classical guitar, so I'm referring now only to flamenco. You might give some thought to not playing set pieces. I know there is a long history of concert flamenco guitarists playing set pieces in performance. And I know it gives something of a sense of security to know where you're going. But Sabicas or Paco, or any of the great virtuosos were also accompanists, and they certainly never played a set accompaniment. And you didn't see them making mistakes despite the fact that they didn't know where they were going. Nor did you see them hesitating trying to figure out what falseta to play next.

Accompanying is also performing. An advanced flamenco guitarist knows a substantial number of falsetas in any given palo. And when performing as an accompanist, he just plays them in whatever order they come out of his head and hands. There is no reason not to play the same way when performing as a soloist. If you just practice various falsetas as independent entities, which they are, practice becomes more relaxed and fun, because you don't have to concentrate on a long rigid sequence. Moreover, your playing stays fresh and interesting, because you never play any given palo the same way twice. This is the very essence of flamenco – constant variety within a fixed framework.

If in any given palo you knew just ten falsetas – and obviously we all know a lot more than that – but with only ten, the number of different sequences that you could play them in is hard to believe. I have asked for guesses, and the answers range from "dozens" to "hundreds," with some guessing "a few thousand." The actual number of possible sequences with only ten falsetas is more than three million. That means that by playing falsetas in random order you can never play any palo the same way twice.

I think that you might give some thought to simply practicing less, and once you have the music down pat ease up.

Ramon

_____________________________

Classical and flamenco guitars from Spain Ramon Amira Guitars
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 4:24:42
 
KMMI77

Posts: 1821
Joined: Jul. 26 2009
From: The land down under

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

quote:

Any comments?


Great topic Grisha,

In my eyes you are an extremely unique guy. Your technique is at such a high level that your technique itself becomes the focus for me when i watch and hear you play. To be honest, I feel this way more so with you than when watching any other guitarist.

I imagine that for someone like you, peoples expectations could act as a major barrier to your expression. Do you put a lot of pressure on yourself when you play? Do you feel free to take chances and make mistakes?

I can feel your musicality,expression and emotion most when you play your own ideas. It is more difficult to understand and accept your expression when your playing something by Paco for example. As I find myself unintentionally listening for the original. And often reverting back to amazement of your technique and ability to replicate.

If you are feeling like you are having a musical block. Perhaps analyzing the way you are thinking and where your focus is at during playing may open some new doors? You could ask yourself things like, Where is my focus when playing? Do I personally require total focus on left and right hand positioning and motion, and mental preparation for what's next when playing? Do I feel able to maintain the technical side while letting my mind wander into honesty? And see what results you get by focusing on different things.

In the end i think these blocks happen to everyone. I am reminded of an interview that someone posted here recently with Tomatito. The interviewer asks him to play and express something, he tries and then says, I can't do it now.

I don't think it is possible to control x factor through technique.

Your still a young guy Grisha. You have already achieved so much. I believe the future for you will be full of deeper and deeper musicality and expression. Just play whatever you want because you like it! Plus remember that you are already kicking all our asses so don't complain

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 4:53:03
 
Arash

Posts: 4409
Joined: Aug. 9 2006
From: Iran (living in Germany)

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

I don't know if this has anything to do with it, but when i hear a recording too often, daily , for several weeks, i get tired., even if its paco, i don't get goose bumps anymore. i have to make a pause to be able to feel that again with that recording. also when i practice something again and again for several days and weeks, the joy at the beginning is not there anymore. it becomes "boring". whatever composition it is, it becomes boring. same here, i have to make a pause to enjoy that again

I don't think your case is something special.
I think everyone has that experience.

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 4:54:58
 
Ramon Amira

 

Posts: 1025
Joined: Oct. 14 2009
From: New York City

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Arash

quote:

I don't know if this has anything to do with it, but when i hear a recording too often, daily , for several weeks, i get tired., even if its paco, i don't get goose bumps anymore. i have to make a pause to be able to feel that again with that recording. also when i practice something again and again for several days and weeks, the joy at the beginning is not there anymore. it becomes "boring". whatever composition it is, it becomes boring. same here, i have to make a pause to enjoy that again

I don't think your case is something special.
I think everyone has that experience.


That's exactly what I was talking about when I mentioned not playing set pieces. With a set piece, after you've practiced it to death, you're bored with it and don't want to play it or hear it anymore. But if you play falsetas in random order any palo remains interesting because you never play it the same way twice.

Ramon

_____________________________

Classical and flamenco guitars from Spain Ramon Amira Guitars
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 5:09:36
 
RTC

Posts: 667
Joined: Aug. 20 2008
From: DFW Area, Texas

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

Grisha:

i have seen countless videos of you and every time I revisit any of them i am just impress with the gift that you have. I also recognize that you have spent and will spend countless hours practicing.

I admire your courage to post such a concern on your part, I think than most professionals would not have the nerve to express such things.

I can only say that you have a strong following and people that admire and respect your talents and unconditional support in this forum. I wish you continued success, and a quick recovery from your current challenge.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 5:33:18
 
koenie17

 

Posts: 438
Joined: Feb. 25 2011
 

[Deleted] 

Post has been moved to the Recycle Bin at May 4 2012 9:27:41
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 7:24:28
 
koenie17

Posts: 438
Joined: Feb. 25 2011
From: España

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

Go to a place you have never been before with people you dont know, sit in and just have a good time playing(and listening!). Mistakes will certanly happen, but if youre lucky...... Magic can make the music flow and amazing moments make everything worth wile again.
Of course this is my personal opinion. and for me your playing is AMAZING!
Good luck!
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 7:33:05
 
gerundino63

Posts: 1570
Joined: Jul. 11 2003
From: The Netherlands

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

Hi Grisha

While practicing you order your brain to play perfect,so you train yourself to play perfect.

If you give your brain the order to play beautiful, you will actually train yourself to play beautiful.

Is it a good idea to make a training to practice to play beautiful? Separated from your other practice points?

This way you are not thinking of mistakes, do not reflect, just play beautiful......

You actualy can practice this.

Peter.

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 7:51:49
 
manicfingers

 

Posts: 47
Joined: Nov. 19 2011
 

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

It's as if at any given moment of performing or practicing, the technical side of the brain (requiring conscious thought) is overwhelming the subtler emotional/artistics energies that arise naturally *specifically in the absence of conscious thought*.

There's a battle going on, and your technical side is winning. Being anxious also shuts down the emotional/artistic subtler energies.

So to force a rebalance in favour of the artistic/emotional energies, take each palo in turn and completely strip it down complexity wise until it holds zero technical challenge/anxiety in playing for you, then while playing it, trying to emotionally inhabit the space that's left.

Use the palos as intended.. alegrias.. play the simplest most authentic construction you can, and try to infuse it with joy. And the opposite for Siguiriyas etc.

For me, the two videos of Moraito at the Bimhuis is an amazing performance of simple authentic flamenco. That guy is living in the moment when he plays that stuff, and as a listener you can 'feel Moraito' when he plays it.. you don't just listen to it.- you feel connected. He's projecting something that is specifically not technical, and is coming from the artistic / emotional centre.

Who am I, a random off the internet, to give Grisha advice ? . Anyway.. you asked.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 8:03:51
 
xirdneH_imiJ

Posts: 1776
Joined: Dec. 2 2006
From: Budapest, Hungary

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to manicfingers

i have found that whenever i practice someone else's piece or falseta, i try to go for a note for note perfection, i want to hear "that" piece coming out of my fingers...but when i practice my own stuff, i automatically switch into emotional mode, i don't really care about the notes, mistakes, sometimes change things, play with a different technique, etc...i have no explanation for this, it's automatic...
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 10:30:07
 
Kevin James Shanahan

Posts: 407
Joined: Oct. 10 2010
From: Wooli, NSW Australia

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

You can be sure that your audience , will be experiencing the emotions that you speak of . Keep your practice , be tight and clean , you are taking people away from thier lives , think of the person in the audience who has lost a loved one , got married , had a child etc... . Love your audience " All you need is love " .

_____________________________

Peace.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 11:06:47
 
Ricardo

Posts: 12682
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

Smoke some weed? Just kidding.

You are not required to emote anything when playing. But you have to get all the notes, or most of em. Don't worry about the cliche "all tech, no feel"....its BS unless you have been lobatamized, everybody has emotion and emotes unless deliberately trying to hide it. When you hear an edited recording, you can still feel emotional because it's about the listener more then the player at that point. Or the composer. If you simply performed only your own compositions you would not have this personal problem. Nunez or Moraito play technically perfectly because every note they play is like one of their own children, not becaue what they wrote is "easy" to play. Technique is a non issue, its simple expressing a creation. THe only alternative if you MUST interpret other's works is to, as others have said, take away any technique issue with any piece. THat means don't play stuff that is so DAMN hard!! Play pieces you can play in any state drunk sober not warmed up etc, and you will feel just great about how your "emoting". Won't mean much for the audience but YOU'LL be happy.

the issue about 5 notes vs 100 are EXREMELY technical details. One guy vs the other has no rights to more emotion then the other. But timing, dynamic, vibrato style, tone, attack, etc etc sure "Musical" but extreme technical reasons having nothing to do with happy or sad feelings that day.

Steve VAi had a great technique exercise. Take a phrase, a melody, or lets say falseta. TRY your hardest to simpley play the notes as they are meaning ZERO expression, just purely flat. Good luck it's not as easy as it sounds, at least for guitar players..

_____________________________

CD's and transcriptions available here:
www.ricardomarlow.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 13:27:24
 
keith

Posts: 1108
Joined: Sep. 29 2009
From: Land of Daniel Boone

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

as the teacher who taught me how to play guitar told me--make the piece your own and not mimic the composer or other performers. this may entail taking a standard piece and reworking it with different falsettas or taking two or three pieces and merging them into one piece. taking breaks helps.

as to falling in love. part of being in love is that we do not have control over our love interest and that allows us/forces us to keep our minds open to possibilities and, to a degree, some uncertainity. in this state we have to grow to allow us to retain our love interest and growth opens up new avenues.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 14:16:11
 
jg7238

 

Posts: 2846
Joined: May 11 2009
 

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

I think you really need to focus more on your own compositions. You can already play the repertoire of the masters in your sleep. If you focus more on composing and are able to take it to the next level where the quality of composition at least matches up with your level of technique, you will ultimately arrive where you want. To do that, is not an easy thing. Mistakes is a non-issue especially when we are talking about you. :) I’m pretty sure you will achieve what you want. Best of luck on your journey Grisha.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 14:16:19
 
guitarbuddha

 

Posts: 2970
Joined: Jan. 4 2007
 

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

Hi Grisha. I am sorry you are a little down.

It may be some that you are not being as objective as usual. Stress, dealing with other peoples petty jealousy, lack of sleep and unfamiliar surroundings can make us suggestable.


Nothing feels more visceral than singing whilst strumming. Maybe songs from your childhood will cheer you up. And you might open up to some new/old emotional directions in your playing.

The other thing is to start finding which are the five good/important notes amongst the thousand and work on different ways of joining them together as you reintroduce the other ninehundredandninetyfive gradually and creatively. Working on musical flexibility, not on one concrete interpretation but on an attitude of constant discovery.

Anyway enough of my rambling... be well.


D.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 15:12:59
 
Grisha

 

Posts: 1251
Joined: Mar. 17 2005
 

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

Thank you all so much for your answers! Lot's of good stuff here, great food for thought. Much appreciated!

To answer some of you that mentioned composing... This affects all the music I play: my concert repertoire, pieces I haven't played in a while, my own music, my improvisation. Maybe, it's not as severe as what I made it sound like. Perhaps I am just physically and emotionally exhausted. In recent concerts my slow numbers were close to the most musical I have ever played. But during practice I can't touch that.

Question off topic: are all performers necessarily composers? And can working hard with little talent achieve similar results to those of a person with huge compositional talent and intuitive vision? And if not, is it still worth it to put out music that was created mostly by mind, with little intuitive feel to guide you? In other words, music that does not say anything, but is compositionally correct and even complex?

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 16:09:05
 
jamh2000

 

Posts: 41
Joined: Jan. 13 2012
 

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

I can absolutley relate to what you say.

For example, after going on holiday and coming back to the guitar after two weeks, I 'hear' the real sound of the guitar much more fully. Hearing the sound, its beauty, colour and complexity, gives you the tools to play with emotion- the 'brushes' to start painting with the guitar again, to use a dodgy metaphor.

In many ways, I think the ability to play the guitar well is overwhelmingly dependent on your ability to hear your playing 'objectively', and not let it be coloured by your opinion of yourself or anything else. This means hearing the good things as well as the bad things. Sometimes when I practice a lot, I have a tendency to start thinking too much about myself and losing the ability to be in the moment. But it's not really the amount I'm doing, its because I'm doing it in the wrong way.

Its easy to find this very depressing and start thinking I just don't have the capacity to do this, but when it clicks you realise that you do and things shoud always be like that! I think its about working out what practices help you live in the moment and what things push you away and towards thinking about yourself. As people have said, you have clearly been very very good at playing with emotion - I've loved many of your performances- particularly of thoe ones of Riqueni pieces- the gujiras video is really stunning and I often listen to it instead of the original version. You clearly 'have it' but just need to find how to keep it as consistently as you would like.

A person with limited talent but who can really hear the sound of the guitar and treat it with due seriousness will always play better than the person with phenomenal talent who thinks about themselves as they play. The person with pehnomenal talent has the potential to achieve better things, but they are also more at risk of falling into the traps described above.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 16:24:17
 
keith

Posts: 1108
Joined: Sep. 29 2009
From: Land of Daniel Boone

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

The question about working hard with little talent makes me recall a line from Little Feat's "Old Folks Boggie"...."you know when you are over the hill, your mind makes a promise your body can't fill". The same sort of holds true for those with a vivid imagination but not possessing the mastery of skills to execute those thoughts. Frustrating? Yes! But the music that is in the head remains worth the struggle. In many ways it is the struggle that gives something more value--especially emotional value.
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 17:12:08
 
Grisha

 

Posts: 1251
Joined: Mar. 17 2005
 

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

Very good, Keith! And what of the people with merely average imagination? What if the music in your head is vague and resembles very much something you've heard from someone else, and it persistently tries to steer that way?

Thanks for the advice, jamh2000!

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 17:25:42
 
keith

Posts: 1108
Joined: Sep. 29 2009
From: Land of Daniel Boone

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

Grisha, I have always found that "average" imagination is usually no more than imagination not allowed to run wild or is in the process of developing into something more than "average". I would recommend that is you have something floating about in your head to just grab it and run with it--you never know where it will take you. You have an advantage as when your mind makes a promise your fingers can definitely fulfill. Have fun!
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 17:51:49
 
Grisha

 

Posts: 1251
Joined: Mar. 17 2005
 

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

Thanks for your reply, Keith!

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 18:07:51

ToddK

 

Posts: 2960
Joined: Dec. 6 2004
 

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

quote:

And can working hard with little talent achieve similar results to those of a person with huge compositional talent and intuitive vision?


Interestingly, Paco talks about this in Light and Shade.

Basically, its the old cliche, "1 percent inspiration, 99 percent persperation"

Most of the time you have to work. You will not always have brilliant
visions floating through your head.
Thats ok, it doesnt mean you wont write something brilliant. Sometimes,
the vision comes through the work.

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 18:40:49
 
Grisha

 

Posts: 1251
Joined: Mar. 17 2005
 

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

Thanks, Todd! Has this been the case with you? For example, that beautiful alegrias that you composed a while back?

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 18:42:47

ToddK

 

Posts: 2960
Joined: Dec. 6 2004
 

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

quote:

Thanks, Todd! Has this been the case with you? For example, that beautiful alegrias that you composed a while back?


That alegrias just came to me one day, it was wierd.

That is a good example of what we're talking about. Im sure i could
write something else of equal quality, but it would probably take me
weeks instead of days, and it would be alot of labor and sweat.

Why am i not doing that?? I dont know. Its all about motivation. I enjoy
playing. Im not in a position where i am forced to write anything, so i dont.
I just have fun playing. I am SO thankful to God for giving me my right hand
back, i will never complain about anything else ever again in my life.

The thing is, just because people here are telling you to write, doesnt mean
thats what you should do.

You should do what your heart tells you to do. I think you are doing absolutely
wonderfully at what you're doing now.
I always felt like Paco was tortured by the expectation of his fans. But he
never had to be.
You dont have to be either. Play what you want. Im a huge fan of yours, and i just want to see you doing what you love, wether its writing your own stuff,
or playing a Paco Bulerias.

Just do your thing man. You are one of the best players on the planet right now.
The world is yours...

_____________________________

  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 18:58:35
 
Kalo

 

Posts: 400
Joined: Jan. 25 2011
 

RE: Practice and Musicality (in reply to Grisha

quote:

That alegrias just came to me one day, it was wierd.

That is a good example of what we're talking about. Im sure i could
write something else of equal quality, but it would probably take me
weeks instead of days, and it would be alot of labor and sweat.

Why am i not doing that?? I dont know. Its all about motivation. I enjoy
playing. Im not in a position where i am forced to write anything, so i dont.
I just have fun playing. I am SO thankful to God for giving me my right hand
back, i will never complain about anything else ever again in my life.

The thing is, just because people here are telling you to write, doesnt mean
thats what you should do.

You should do what your heart tells you to do. I think you are doing absolutely
wonderfully at what you're doing now.
I always felt like Paco was tortured by the expectation of his fans. But he
never had to be.
You dont have to be either. Play what you want. Im a huge fan of yours, and i just want to see you doing what you love, wether its writing your own stuff,
or playing a Paco Bulerias.

Just do your thing man. You are one of the best players on the planet right now.
The world is yours...


Well said ToddK, I enjoyed reading your reply

Grisha, your an awesome player and I very much enjoy listening to you!!! Maybe you are just too hard on yourself.....

I HOPE to one day play just a 10 as good as you and all the rest on this board...

If that happens, then I might worry about creating, but, being a rock guitarist...
I know something about creating and that is COPYING and you've done all that...

Who cares if it's not original...What really is??? Just take all those awesome ideas you've learnt and mix them up and let the FEELINGS pour out...Don't worry if the idea isn't NEW...It's all be done before..

Create, and don't worry about mistakes or orginiality...Then you'll have the feelings you desire...

OMG, who am I to give Grisha advise

Kalo
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 4 2012 19:24:16
Page:   [1] 2 3    >   >>
All Forums >>Discussions >>General >> Page: [1] 2 3    >   >>
Jump to:

New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


Forum Software powered by ASP Playground Advanced Edition 2.0.5
Copyright © 2000 - 2003 ASPPlayground.NET

0.09375 secs.