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RE: Black Hole eats sun   You are logged in as Guest
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Ricardo

Posts: 10937
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: Black Hole eats sun (in reply to Ricardo

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/04/black-holes-milky-way-galaxy/557333/

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  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date Apr. 7 2018 18:31:10
 
Ricardo

Posts: 10937
Joined: Dec. 14 2004
From: Washington DC

RE: Black Hole eats sun (in reply to Ricardo

Still waiting...

quote:

Apart from this logistical delay, the EHT team has spent many months first studying the combined data to make sure that all the detrimental effects that could degrade the event horizon image are fully understood. These effects include turbulence in the Earth’s atmosphere as well as random noise and spurious signals added by our own instrumentation. To do this, we use EHT observations of bright quasars (much more distant and brighter cosmic sources observed along with our main targets: Sgr A* and the more massive black hole in galaxy M 87) to calibrate the array. These are sources that have known structure -- or appearance on the sky -- so astronomers can estimate the instrumental effects and compensate for them as they analyze and make images from the raw data.

EHT scientists have been using data from these calibrators to refine techniques for processing the combined data into images. Independent teams within the EHT have developed novel algorithms to convert the raw VLBI data into maps of radio emission on the sky. Using EHT data on the quasars to test these new methods, the teams are all now producing very similar images, giving us confidence that the tools developed over the past year are robust enough to be applied to Sgr A* and M 87 -- black holes large enough that we may be able to see ’silhouettes’ of their event horizons.

Though our EHT collaboration has grown to now include over 200 members, many of us have been occupied recently with planning and carrying out new observations this month. Since we can observe only once per year, during a period of good weather at both Northern and Southern hemisphere sites, many of us have to divert our attention to planning global operations. This April the EHT re-observed Sgr A* and M 87 using an array that included a telescope in Greenland for the first time and captured twice the amount of data recorded in 2017. These new observations, with a greatly improved EHT, will allow us to study changes in our target black hole sources, as well as confirm any results from the 2017 data.


_____________________________

CD's and transcriptions available here:
www.ricardomarlow.com
  REPORT THIS POST AS INAPPROPRIATE |  Date May 7 2018 15:51:10
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