Robbie Krieger (Full Version)

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garra402 -> Robbie Krieger (May 20 2020 3:16:37)

https://youtu.be/-CxA6Qgj7GA




Richard Jernigan -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 20 2020 6:35:37)

Sigh. The guitar is not made entirely of spruce. The back and sides are cypress, the soundboard is spruce. The pegs aren't ebony, they are rosewood.

There are more than four or five "forms" in flamenco. "Leyenda" is not one of them.

He starts off playing tarantas and somehow morphs over into a mangled version of granainas, then just noodles around.

During one episode of thumb work he moves not just his whole hand, but also his whole arm for each thumb stroke.

He's playing a fragment of the classical composer Isaac Albeniz's "Asturias" also called (apparently by Albeniz) "Leyenda." In fact flamenco guitarists of the early 20th century used this passage as a falseta in granainas. I have never been able to find out which came first, the flamenco falseta, or Albeniz's piano piece.

He ends with a rough approximation of the very beginning of a Mario Escudero granainas.

And so on...

He seems to be a bit out of it: No fault of Krieger's. People get old. But why post this?

RNJ




kitarist -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 20 2020 6:41:46)

quote:

And so on...


Well, he did say it is fla-minn-co night, so..




Richard Jernigan -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 20 2020 7:01:57)

Chances are, one of these days I will be a bit out of it too. I have known only very few people who retained their mental sharpness into their nineties.

My father was in good shape up to age 90. My mother did well until 94. But both of them pretty much lost it during the last three or four years of their lives.

My great-uncle Custis Lee Jernigan lived to be 96. He was president of the Vicksburg, Mississippi school board in his late eighties, his last episode of public service. He wasn't a politician, but he held a few offices in the city and county over the years. At age 96 he made from scratch a detailed working model of a water pumping windmill and sent it to his brother, my grandfather. It had hundreds of pieces, all worked by hand. On a Saturday he asked his oldest son to assemble all his siblings after church on Sunday. His son asked why. "I think I'm going to die," answered Uncle Tuss.

After a good Sunday dinner, cake and coffee, prepared by his second wife, Uncle Tuss told his offspring he had lived a long and prosperous life, he felt blessed and honored by having them. He said he had felt poorly for the last few days. He recited his will verbatim, several pages. He gave them all his blessing and wished them well.

The next day he took to his bed and died.

I know of no more fortunate ending.

But if I lose a few steps before I depart, I trust my friends not to publish videos of me.

RNJ




kitarist -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 20 2020 7:50:34)

I see now you've added a sentence after "and so on.." in the previous post. I might not have replied had I seen it then; now my jokey reply seems odd/insensitive.. Sorry about that.

I just happened to be reading Bertrand Russell's short essay "How to grow old" last Sunday(*) - which is really about how not to grow old, as he says:

quote:

In spite of the title, this article will really be on how not to grow old, which, at my time of life, is a much more important subject. My first advice would be to choose your ancestors carefully.

[:)]

A couple of other paragraphs:

quote:

Make your interests gradually wider and more impersonal, until bit by bit the walls of the ego recede, and your life becomes increasingly merged in the universal life. An individual human existence should be like a river — small at first, narrowly contained within its banks, and rushing passionately past rocks and over waterfalls. Gradually the river grows wider, the banks recede, the waters flow more quietly, and in the end, without any visible break, they become merged in the sea, and painlessly lose their individual being.


and at the very end:

quote:

The man who, in old age, can see his life in this way, will not suffer from the fear of death, since the things he cares for will continue. And if, with the decay of vitality, weariness increases, the thought of rest will not be unwelcome. I should wish to die while still at work, knowing that others will carry on what I can no longer do and content in the thought that what was possible has been done.


(*) Available for free as part of the collection "Portraits from Memory and Other Essays" here: https://archive.org/details/portraitsfrommem011249mbp/page/n55/mode/2up




rasqeo77 -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 20 2020 9:15:10)

I’m sure Spanish Caravan must have introduced many rock fans to flamenco so maybe he deserves a bit of slack. I always though he was an interesting player with some great melodies. I hope I’m still playing at his age.




Mark2 -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 20 2020 16:50:21)

geeez that was painful. I couldn't watch more than 1/2 a minute.




kitarist -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 20 2020 17:14:25)

quote:

I hope I’m still playing at his age.


He is 74. I don't think that's old for guitar playing at all. Most of the still-active big 1970s rock/metal bands are in their 70s now.

Deep Purple's (and later Rainbow's and Blackmore's Night's) Ritchie Blackmore just turned 75 last month..[sm=Smiley Guitar.gif]




BarkellWH -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 20 2020 21:06:26)

quote:

I hope I’m still playing at his age.


Odds are you will. In 1983, while on a Washington, DC assignment, I had the great good fortune to see (separately) concerts performed by Andres Segovia, who was at the time 90 years old, and Carlos Montoya, who was 80 years old. I don't know how much longer Segovia performed because the following year I was on an overseas assignment. I do know, however, that Montoya performed until he was 85 or 86 years old.

Bill




TonyGonzales84 -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 20 2020 23:24:53)

Segovia performed for several years more, as I saw him in Los Angeles, spring 1985.




Auda -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 21 2020 0:23:28)

quote:

He's playing a fragment of the classical composer Isaac Albeniz's "Asturias" also called (apparently by Albeniz) "Leyenda."


He also used some of it in one of the Doors hits - don't recall which one though. Must be getting old too.

Cheers




Richard Jernigan -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 21 2020 5:34:39)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Auda

quote:

He's playing a fragment of the classical composer Isaac Albeniz's "Asturias" also called (apparently by Albeniz) "Leyenda."


He also used some of it in one of the Doors hits - don't recall which one though. Must be getting old too.

Cheers


Spanish Caravan. It's on Youtube.




Piwin -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 21 2020 7:15:21)

His solo album "Singularity" from about a decade ago includes a few flamenco-adjacent pieces. My recollection of them is that they were bits and pieces of various palos mixed together without any structure that would be recognized as flamenco.

Perusing the web, it seems that he was taught by Frank Chin and Arnold Lessing, though I can't find anything about them in terms of proficiency. In one video, Krieger says that he taught flamenco in a community college, which, going off of this video, can only make one pause.

Perhaps it is just age, but I'm getting the picture of someone who had some minor degree of interest in flamenco and never bothered to delve any deeper than the superficial.

At the very least, he's proud enough of that vague assemblage of bits and pieces to play it in concerts:




rasqeo77 -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 21 2020 8:47:12)

I’d have to agree with piwin. I don’t think it’s just his age - he’s just not very good at playing flamenco but I suppose he plays enough to impress people who know nothing about flamenco. He’s not the first to do that and I’m sure he won’t be the last.




Auda -> RE: Robbie Krieger (May 21 2020 23:47:45)

quote:

Spanish Caravan. It's on Youtube.


Cheers for setting me straight.




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